Dalton Trumbo


Born
in Montrose, CO, The United States
December 09, 1905

Died
September 10, 1976

Genre


Dalton Trumbo worked as a cub reporter for the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, covering courts, the high school, the mortuary and civic organizations. He attended the University of Colorado for two years working as a reporter for the Boulder Daily Camera and contributing to the campus humor magazine, the yearbook and the campus newspaper. He got his start working for Vogue magazine. His first published novel, Eclipse, was about a town and its people, written in the social realist style, and drew on his years in Grand Junction. He started writing for movies in 1937; by the 1940s, he was one of Hollywood's highest paid writers for work on such films as Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944), and Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (1945), and Kitty Foyle ( ...more

Average rating: 4.18 · 36,017 ratings · 2,397 reviews · 18 distinct worksSimilar authors
Johnny Got His Gun

4.18 avg rating — 35,744 ratings — published 1939 — 5 editions
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Night of the Aurochs

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3.93 avg rating — 96 ratings — published 1979 — 4 editions
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Additional Dialogue: Letter...

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4.44 avg rating — 45 ratings — published 1970 — 2 editions
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Eclipse

3.74 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1935 — 4 editions
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The Time of the Toad: A Stu...

3.79 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1949 — 7 editions
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Spartacus: Screenplay

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 11 ratings
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The Biggest Thief in Town

4.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1949
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The Remarkable Andrew

3.67 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1941 — 2 editions
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Neale S. Godfrey's Ultimate...

3.86 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 1991 — 7 editions
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The Time of the Toad: A Stu...

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More books by Dalton Trumbo…
“If I were dead and buried And I heard your voice, Beneath the sod My heart of dust Would still rejoice.”
Dalton Trumbo

“did anybody ever come back from the dead any single one of the millions who got killed did any one of them ever come back and say by god i'm glad i'm dead because death is always better than dishonor? did they say i'm glad i died to make the world safe for democracy? did they say i like death better than losing liberty? did any of them ever say it's good to think i got my guts blown out for the honor of my country? did any of them ever say look at me i'm dead but i died for decency and that's better than being alive? did any of them ever say here i am i've been rotting for two years in a foreign grave but it's wonderful to die for your native land? did any of them say hurray i died for womanhood and i'm happy see how i sing even though my mouth is choked with worms?”
Dalton Trumbo, Johnny Got His Gun

“Of course a lot of guys were ashamed. Somebody said let's go out and fight for liberty and so they went out and got killed without ever once thinking of liberty. And what kind of liberty were they fighting for anyway? How much liberty and whose kind of liberty? Were they fighting for the liberty of eating free ice cream cones all their lives or for the liberty of robbing anybody they pleased whenever they wanted to or what? You tell a man he can't rob and you take away some of his liberty. You've got to. What the hell does liberty mean anyhow? It's a word like house or table or any other word. Only it's a special kind of word. A guy says house and he can point to a house to prove it. But a guy says come on let's fight for liberty and he can't show you liberty. He can't prove the thing he's talking about so how in the hell can he be telling you to fight for it? No sir anybody who went out and got into the front line trenches to fight for liberty was a goddamn fool and the guy who got him there was a liar.”
Dalton Trumbo, Johnny Got His Gun

Polls

October 2015 New School Classics Group Read

1934, Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers, 209 pages
 
  26 votes, 19.3%

1982, Schindler's List by Thomas Keneally, 429 pages
 
  24 votes, 17.8%

1981, Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie, 647 pages
 
  16 votes, 11.9%

1931, The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck, 418 pages
 
  9 votes, 6.7%

 
  9 votes, 6.7%

 
  9 votes, 6.7%

1958, Our Man in Havana by Graham Greene, 220 pages
 
  8 votes, 5.9%

1997, American Pastoral by Philip Roth, 432 pages
 
  7 votes, 5.2%

1971, Maurice by E.M. Forster, 256 pages
 
  6 votes, 4.4%

1939, Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo, 243 pages
 
  5 votes, 3.7%

1997, Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier, 449 pages
 
  3 votes, 2.2%

 
  3 votes, 2.2%

1972, Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino, 165 pages
 
  3 votes, 2.2%

 
  3 votes, 2.2%

 
  2 votes, 1.5%

1963, Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar, 564 pages
 
  1 vote, 0.7%

1905, The Petty Demon by Fyodor Sologub, 352 pages
 
  1 vote, 0.7%

1997, Out by Natsuo Kirino, 400 pages
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

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