Eric Klinenberg

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Eric Klinenberg


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Eric Klinenberg is Professor of Sociology; Public Policy; and Media, Culture, and Communications at New York University. He is the author of Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone (The Penguin Press, 2012), Fighting for Air: The Battle to Control America’s Media (Metropolitan Books, 2007), and Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (University of Chicago Press, 2002), as well as the editor of Cultural Production in a Digital Age and of the journal Public Culture. His scholarly work has been published in journals including the American Sociological Review, Theory and Society, and Ethnography, and he has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, Time Magazine, Fortune, The Wall St ...more

Average rating: 3.8 · 182,081 ratings · 14,059 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Modern Romance

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3.80 avg rating — 178,297 ratings — published 2015 — 49 editions
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Palaces for the People: How...

3.98 avg rating — 3,203 ratings — published 2018 — 14 editions
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Going Solo: The Extraordina...

3.41 avg rating — 2,567 ratings — published 2012 — 22 editions
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Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy...

3.91 avg rating — 928 ratings — published 2002 — 5 editions
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The Fragile Earth: Writings...

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4.29 avg rating — 154 ratings — published 2020 — 11 editions
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Fighting for Air: The Battl...

3.82 avg rating — 107 ratings — published 2000 — 12 editions
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Antidemocracy in America: T...

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3.78 avg rating — 9 ratings4 editions
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Cultural Production in a Di...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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Climate Change and the Futu...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2016
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READ AN EXCERPT Look Inside...

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More books by Eric Klinenberg…
“In a world where we spend ever more of our time staring at screens, blocking out even our most intimate and proximate human contacts, public institutions with open-door policies compel us to pay close attention to people nearby. After all, places like libraries are saturated with strangers, people whose bodies are different, whose styles are different, who make different sounds, speak different languages, give off different, sometimes noxious, smells. Spending time in public social infrastructures requires learning to deal with these differences in a civil manner.”
Eric Klinenberg, Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life

“What counts as social infrastructure? I define it capaciously. Public institutions such as libraries, schools, playgrounds, parks, athletic fields, and swimming pools are vital parts of the social infrastructure. So too are sidewalks, courtyards, community gardens, and other green spaces that invite people into the public realm. Community organizations, including churches and civic associations, act as social infrastructures when they have an established physical space where people can assemble, as do regularly scheduled markets for food, furniture, clothing, art, and other consumer goods. Commercial establishments can also be important parts of the social infrastructure, particularly when they operate as what the sociologist Ray Oldenburg called "third spaces," places (like cafes, diners, barbershops, and bookstores) where people are welcome to congregate and linger regardless of what they've purchased.”
Eric Klinenberg, Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life

“Today, as cities and suburbs reinvent themselves, and as cynics claim that government has nothing good to contribute to that process, it's important that institutions like libraries get the recognition they deserve. After all, the root of the word "library," liber; means both "book" and "free." Libraries stand for and exemplify something that needs defending: the public institutions that -- even in an age of atomization and inequality -- serve as bedrocks of civil society. Libraries are the kinds of places where ordinary people with different backgrounds, passions, and interests can take part in a living democratic culture. They are the kinds of places where the public, private, and philanthropic sectors can work together to reach for something higher than the bottom line.”
Eric Klinenberg, Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life

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