Patrick Radden Keefe


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Patrick Radden Keefe is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of The Snakehead and Chatter. His work has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Slate, New York, and The New York Review of Books. He received the 2014 National Magazine Award for Feature Writing, for his story "A Loaded Gun," was a finalist for the National Magazine Award for Reporting in 2015 and 2016, and is also the recipient of an Eric and Wendy Schmidt Fellowship at the New America Foundation and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Average rating: 4.4 · 12,924 ratings · 2,016 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Say Nothing: A True Story o...

4.47 avg rating — 11,309 ratings — published 2018 — 13 editions
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The Snakehead: An Epic Tale...

3.99 avg rating — 1,312 ratings — published 2009 — 13 editions
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Chatter: Dispatches from th...

3.58 avg rating — 304 ratings — published 2005 — 17 editions
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Untitled

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Unspeakable Acts: True Tale...

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“Claude Lévi-Strauss once observed that, “for the majority of the human species, and for tens of thousands of years, the idea that humanity includes every human being on the face of the earth does not exist at all. The designation stops at the border of each tribe, or linguistic”
Patrick Radden Keefe, Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland

“if you could just get people to talk, he believed, the most bitter antagonists could discover common ground.”
Patrick Radden Keefe, Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland

“The body is a fantastic machine,’ Hughes told Mackers in one of his Boston College interviews, recounting the grueling sequence of a hunger strike. ‘It’ll eat off all the fat tissue first, then it starts eating away at the muscle, to keep your brain alive.’ Long after Hughes and Price called an end to their strikes and attempted to reintegrate into society, the nursed old grudges and endlessly replayed their worst wartime abominations. In a sense, they never stopped devouring themselves.”
Patrick Radden Keefe, Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland



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