David J. Chalmers





David J. Chalmers


Born
April 20, 1966

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David J. Chalmers is a philosopher at the Australian National University. Officially: Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Centre for Consciousness, and an ARC Federation Fellow. Works in the philosophy of mind and in related areas of philosophy and cognitive science and is especially interested in consciousness and in philosophical issues about meaning and possibility, in the foundations of cognitive science and of physics, and of other things.

Average rating: 3.97 · 2,276 ratings · 76 reviews · 16 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Conscious Mind: In Sear...

3.97 avg rating — 1,720 ratings — published 1996 — 11 editions
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Philosophy of Mind: Classic...

4.09 avg rating — 340 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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The Character of Consciousness

3.91 avg rating — 91 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
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Constructing the World

3.90 avg rating — 41 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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Metametaphysics: New Essays...

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3.85 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
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The Singularity: A Philosop...

4.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2010
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Scientific American The Puz...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2002
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Che cos’è la coscienza?

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it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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The Two-Dimensional Argumen...

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Panpsychism and Panprotopsy...

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“How does the water of the brain turn into the wine of consciousness?”
David J. Chalmers

“Now I have to say I'm a complete atheist, I have no religious views myself and no spiritual views, except very watered down humanistic spiritual views, and consciousness is just a fact of life, it's a natural fact of life.”
David J. Chalmers

“Why should there be conscious experience at all? It is central to a subjective viewpoint, but from an objective viewpoint it is utterly unexpected. Taking the objective view, we can tell a story about how fields, waves, and particles in the spatiotemporal manifold interact in subtle ways, leading to the development of complex systems such as brains. In principle, there is no deep philosophical mystery in the fact that these systems can process information in complex ways, react to stimuli with sophisticated behavior, and even exhibit such complex capacities as learning, memory, and language. All this is impressive, but it is not metaphysically baffling. In contrast, the existence of conscious experience seems to be a new feature from this viewpoint. It is not something that one would have predicted from the other features alone. That is, consciousness is surprising. If all we knew about were the facts of physics, and even the facts about dynamics and information processing in complex systems, there would be no compelling reason to postulate the existence of conscious experience. If it were not for our direct evidence in the first-person case, the hypothesis would seem unwarranted; almost mystical, perhaps. Yet we know, directly, that there is conscious experience. The question is, how do we reconcile it with everything else we know?”
David J. Chalmers, The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory



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