M. Mitchell Waldrop

M. Mitchell Waldrop



Average rating: 4.11 · 2,019 ratings · 137 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Complexity: The Emerging Sc...

4.06 avg rating — 1,720 ratings — published 1992 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Dream Machine: J.C.R. L...

4.45 avg rating — 301 ratings — published 2001 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Man-Made Minds: The Promise...

3.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1987 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fukuzatsukei: Kagaku Kakume...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2000
Rate this book
Clear rating
Life on Edge Chaos

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by M. Mitchell Waldrop…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Everything affects everything else, and you have to understand that whole web of connections.”
M. Mitchell Waldrop, Complexity: The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos

“If you have a truly complex system," he says, "then the exact patterns are not repeatable. And yet there are themes that are recognizable. In history, for example, you can talk about 'revolutions,' even though one revolution might be quite different from another. So we assign metaphors. It turns out that an awful lot of policy-making has to do with finding the appropriate metaphor. Conversely, bad policy-making almost always involves finding inappropriate metaphors. For example, it may not be appropriate to think about a drug 'war,' with guns and assaults.”
M. Mitchell Waldrop, Complexity: The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos

“Kauffman was in awe when he realized all this. Here it was again: order. Order for free. Order arising naturally from the laws of physics and chemistry. Order emerging spontaneously from molecular chaos and manifesting itself as a system that grows. The idea was indescribably beautiful.

But was it life? Well no, Kauffman had to admit, not if you meant life as we know it today. An autocatalytic set would have had no DNA, no genetic code, no cell membrane. In fact, it would have had no real independent existence except as a haze of molecules floating around in some ancient pond. If an extraterrestrial Darwin had happened by at the time, he (or it) would have been hard put to notice anything unusual. Any given molecule participating in the autocatalytic set would have looked pretty much like any other molecule. The essence was not to be found in any individual piece of the set, but in the overall dynamics of the set: its collective behavior.”
M. Mitchell Waldrop, Complexity: The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
The Next Best Boo...: This topic has been closed to new comments. The Title Game 20481 14082 May 30, 2013 12:53PM  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite M. to Goodreads.