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Austin Buffum quotes (showing 1-30 of 86)

“Beyond simply rewording the standard into teacher-friendly, student-friendly language, teachers need to tightly align these standards with their curriculum, instruction, and assessment.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Research has made it abundantly clear that putting the least capable and least motivated students together in a class with a curriculum that is less challenging and moves at a slower pace increases the achievement gap and is detrimental to students” (DuFour, 2010, p. 23).”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“the four Cs of RTI. They are: Collective responsibility. A shared belief that the primary responsibility of each member of the organization is to ensure high levels of learning for every child. Thinking is guided by the question, Why are we here? Concentrated instruction. A systematic process of identifying essential knowledge and skills that all students must master to learn at high levels, and determining the specific learning needs for each child to get there. Thinking is guided by the question, Where do we need to go? Convergent assessment. An ongoing process of collectively analyzing targeted evidence to determine the specific learning needs of each child and the effectiveness of the instruction the child receives in meeting these needs. Thinking is guided by the question, Where are we now? Certain access. A systematic process that guarantees every student will receive the time and support needed to learn at high levels. Thinking is guided by the question, How do we get every child there?”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Only when schools create a tiered, systematic intervention program can the promise of certain access be realized. A systematic response begins with the school’s ability to identify students who need help. After students are identified, the school must determine the right intervention to meet the child’s learning needs, and then monitor each student’s progress to know if the intervention is working. If the evidence demonstrates that the intervention is not meeting the intended outcome for a specific student, the school must revise the student’s support by providing more intensive and targeted assistance; alternatively, if students reach grade-level expectations, the same flexible time and resources are used to extend students to even higher levels of achievement.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Of the five steps that comprise certain access, there is one step that a school must get right every time: identify. The school may not initially determine the best intervention for a student, but the school will realize the mistake as it monitors the student’s progress and will subsequently revise the program as needed.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Beyond objective assessment data, there is subjective information that best comes from the school professionals who work with the students every day. These observational data are vital to identifying students for additional help and determining why each student is struggling. For this reason, the third way a school should identify students for additional support is to create a systematic and timely process for staff to recommend and discuss students who need help.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“We recommend that teacher input be solicited at least every three to four weeks. Participation from all site educators must be required. If even one teacher is permitted to be excused from the process, then the students who are assigned to this teacher are much less likely to receive additional time and support. Consequently, a school would not be able to tell parents that it does not matter which teacher their child has—because it would matter.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Douglas Reeves’ research (2009) shows that one of a school’s most effective learning strategies is to have highly trained teachers work with the students most at risk.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Collaborative teacher teams should take the lead in determining interventions for students who have not learned essential core standards and English language.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Asking the Right Questions”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“When it comes to students learning essential standards for a particular subject and/or grade level, the teachers who teach that content should be both empowered to design Tier 1 core instruction and lead the school’s response when students require additional support.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Once a standard has been unwrapped into a number of learning targets, teachers can build their assessments at the target level, rather than attempting to assess an entire standard.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Why Are We Here? As Judith Bardwick recommends, “the most important question in any organization has to be ‘‘what is the business of our business?’ Answering this question is the first step in setting priorities” (Bardwick, 1996, p. 134). If this is the case, educators must begin by asking, why are we here?”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Collaborative teacher teams are teams of educators whose classes share essential student learning outcomes; these teachers work collaboratively to ensure that their students master these critical standards. The structure for teacher teams could include grade-level, subject/course-specific, vertical, and/or interdisciplinary teams.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Motivation. Collective responsibility must mean that schools take responsibility for academic learning and for more “behavioral” aspects of a student’s development.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“The problem many schools face is that they are grouping failed learners and students with motivational issues in the same intervention. This happens when schools target students for interventions based on grades or test scores.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“lack of effort is a symptom, not a cause.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Formative assessment is intended to generate feedback that can be used to improve and accelerate student learning (Sadler, 1998).”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“No matter what explains a student’s lack of learning, schools can and must commit to a collective responsibility to providing supports.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Attendance. Chronic absenteeism is one of the most reliable predictors of at-risk youth behavior, such as drug abuse, dropping out of school, and future incarceration.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“absences by a student are a symptom, not a cause.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Behavior. Anyone who has ever taught knows that students cannot learn until they can demonstrate the positive behaviors necessary to succeed in class. For students weak in self-control and social skills, learning becomes collateral damage.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Effective teachers: + Model positive behaviors + Treat students respectfully + Create positive, productive learning environments with clear procedures + Establish positive relationships with all students”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Using formative assessment, teachers can: • Determine what standards students already know and how well they know them • Decide what changes in instruction to make in order to help each student be successful • Create lessons appropriate to the needs of students • Group students for intervention and enrichment • Inform students of their own progress in order for them to set goals”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Once a standard has been unwrapped into a number of learning targets, teachers can build their assessments at the target level, rather than attempting to assess an entire standard. A general guideline to increase the reliability of such assessments is to use three to five questions or “prompts” per learning target (Prometric Services, 2011).”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“Assessments should be conducted in such a way that students feel that assessments are being done “with” them and “for” them, rather than “to” them.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“When teachers use formative assessment in this way, students can learn in six to seven months what will normally take an entire school year to learn (Leahy, Lyon, Thompson, & Wiliam, 2005). Using”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“collaborative teacher teams should build assessments to assess narrow learning targets rather than the entire standard.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“What Knowledge and Skills Will Our Children Need to Be Successful Adults? If the fundamental purpose of school is to prepare our children to be successful adults and citizens, this is logically the next question we should ask. To be sure, the world for which we are preparing our students today is not the world most educators entered when we transitioned from childhood to adulthood.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles
“At its core, RTI is about creating a collective response when students need additional support, rather than leaving this response up to each individual teacher. This process is predicated on the staff having the time necessary to work together. When collaborative time is not embedded in the contract day, teachers are too often forced to make a choice between meeting the needs of their students at school and their children at home, or between making teaching their career and making it their entire life.”
Austin Buffum, Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles

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