The Checklist Manifesto Quotes

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The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande
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The Checklist Manifesto Quotes Showing 61-90 of 91
“I cannot pretend he escaped unscathed. The extended period of low blood pressure damaged an optic nerve and left him essentially blind in one eye. He didn’t get off the respirator for days. He was out of work for months. I was crushed by what I had put him through. Though I apologized to him and carried on with my daily routine, it took me a long time to feel right again in surgery. I can’t do an adrenalectomy without thinking of his case, and I suspect that is good. I have even tried refining the operative technique”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“The philosophy is that you push the power of decision making out to the periphery and away from the center. You give people the room to adapt, based on their experience and expertise. All you ask is that they talk to one another and take responsibility. That is what works.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“the real lesson is that under conditions of true complexity—where the knowledge required exceeds that of any individual and unpredictability reigns—efforts to dictate every step from the center will fail. People need room to act and adapt. Yet”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Faulty memory and distraction are a particular danger in what engineers call all-or-none processes: whether running to the store to buy ingredients for a cake, preparing an airplane for takeoff, or evaluating a sick person in the hospital, if you miss just one key thing, you might as well not have made the effort at all. A”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Surgery has, essentially, four big killers wherever it is done in the world: infection, bleeding, unsafe anesthesia, and what can only be called the unexpected. For the first three, science and experience have given us some straightforward and valuable preventive measures we think we consistently follow but don’t. These misses are simple failures—perfect for a classic checklist.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Checklists seem to provide protection against such failures. They remind us of the minimum necessary steps and make them explicit. They not only offer the possibility of verification but also instill a kind of discipline of higher performance.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“But now the problem we face is ineptitude, or maybe it’s “eptitude”—making sure we apply the knowledge we have consistently and correctly. Just making the right treatment choice among the many options for a heart attack patient can be difficult, even for expert clinicians.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“the 36 percent increase between 2004 and 2007 in lawsuits against attorneys for legal mistakes—the most common being simple administrative errors, like missed calendar dates and clerical screwups, as well as errors in applying the law.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“You must decide whether you want a DO-CONFIRM checklist or a READ-DO checklist.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“You must decide whether you want a DO-CONFIRM checklist or a READ-DO checklist. With a DO-CONFIRM checklist, he said, team members perform their jobs from memory and experience, often separately. But then they stop. They pause to run the checklist and confirm that everything that was supposed to be done was done. With a READ-DO checklist, on the other hand, people carry out the tasks as they check them off—it’s more like a recipe. So for any new checklist created from scratch, you have to pick the type that makes the most sense for the situation. The”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Pinned to the left-hand wall opposite the construction schedule was another butcher-block-size sheet almost identical in form, except this one, O’Sullivan said, was called a “submittal schedule.” It was also a checklist, but it didn’t specify construction tasks; it specified communication tasks. For the way the project managers dealt with the unexpected and the uncertain was by making sure the experts spoke to one another—on X date regarding Y process. The experts could make their individual judgments, but they had to do so as part of a team that took one another’s concerns into account, discussed unplanned developments, and agreed on the way forward. While no one could anticipate all the problems, they could foresee where and when they might occur. The checklist therefore detailed who had to talk to whom, by which date, and about what aspect of construction—who had to share (or “submit”) particular kinds of information before the next steps could proceed.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“The checklist cannot be lengthy. A rule of thumb some use is to keep it to between five and nine items, which is the limit of working memory.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“In the face of the unknown—the always nagging uncertainty about whether, under complex circumstances, things will really be okay—”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“It is common to misconceive how checklists function in complex lines of work. They are not comprehensive how-to guides, whether for building a skyscraper or getting a plane out of trouble. They are quick and simple tools aimed to buttress the skills of expert professionals. And”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“The philosophy is that you push the power of decision making out to the periphery and away from the center. You give people the room to adapt, based on their experience and expertise. All you ask is that they talk to one another and take responsibility. That is what works. The strategy is unexpectedly democratic, and it has become standard nowadays, O’Sullivan told me, even in building inspections. The inspectors do not recompute the wind-force calculations or decide whether the joints in a given building should be bolted or welded, he said. Determining whether a structure like Russia Wharf or my hospital’s new wing is built to code and fit for occupancy involves more knowledge and complexity than any one inspector could possibly have.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“No, the real lesson is that under conditions of true complexity—where the knowledge required exceeds that of any individual and unpredictability reigns—efforts to dictate every step from the center will fail. People need room to act and adapt. Yet they cannot succeed as isolated individuals, either—that is anarchy. Instead, they require a seemingly contradictory mix of freedom and expectation—expectation to coordinate, for example, and also to measure progress toward common goals.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Just ticking boxes is not the ultimate goal here. Embracing a culture of teamwork and discipline is.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“It’s easy to hide in a statement. It’s hard to hide between statements,” Cook said.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“the builders trusted in the power of communication. They didn't believe in the wisdom of the single individual, of even an experienced engineer. They believed in the wisdom of the group, the wisdom of making sure that multiple pairs of eyes were on a problem and then letting the watchers decide what to do.
Man is fallible, but maybe men are less so.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
tags: wisdom
“The very best missed at least one of these minimum steps 6 percent of the time—once in every sixteen patients.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“An inherent tension exists between brevity and effectiveness. Cut too much and you won’t have enough checks to improve care. Leave too much in and the list becomes too long to use. Furthermore,”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“But now the problem we face is ineptitude, or maybe it’s “eptitude”—making sure we apply the knowledge we have consistently and correctly.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“no matter how careful we might be, no matter how much thought we might put in, a checklist has to be tested in the real world, which is inevitably more complicated than expected. First drafts always fall apart, he said, and one needs to study how, make changes, and keep testing until the checklist works consistently.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Anyone who understands systems will know immediately that optimizing parts is not a good route to system excellence,”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Neuroscientists have found that the prospect of making money stimulates the same primitive reward circuits in the brain that cocaine does.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“The biggest cause of serious error in this business is a failure of communication,”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“Before taxiing out to the runway, we paused again for five more checks: whether anti-icing was necessary and completed, the autobrakes were set, the flight controls were checked, the ground equipment was cleared, and no warning lights were on. The three checklists”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“You want people to make sure to get the stupid stuff right. Yet you also want to leave room for craft and judgment and the ability to respond to unexpected difficulties that arise along the way.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“They’d not only nearly killed the man but also failed to recognize how.”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
“But finding a good idea is apparently not all that hard. Finding an entrepreneur who can execute a good idea is a different matter entirely. One needs a person who can take an idea from proposal to reality, work the long hours, build a team, handle the pressures and setbacks, manage technical and people problems alike, and stick with the effort for years on end without getting distracted or going insane. Such people are rare and extremely hard to spot. Smart”
Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right