A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion Quotes

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A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion by Epictetus
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A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion Quotes Showing 1-18 of 18
“Some things are in our control and others not. Things in our control are opinion, pursuit, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever are our own actions. Things not in our control are body, property, reputation, command, and, in one word, whatever are not our actions. The things in our control are by nature free, unrestrained, unhindered; but those not in our control are weak, slavish, restrained, belonging to others. Remember, then, that if you suppose that things which are slavish by nature are also free, and that what belongs to others is your own, then you will be hindered. You will lament, you will be disturbed, and you will find fault both with gods and men. But if you suppose that only to be your own which is your own, and what belongs to others such as it really is, then no one will ever compel you or restrain you. Further, you will find fault with no one or accuse no one. You will do nothing against your will. No one will hurt you, you will have no enemies, and you not be harmed.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“If you want to improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid with regard to external things. Don't wish to be thought to know anything; and even if you appear to be somebody important to others, distrust yourself.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“Men are disturbed not by the things which happen, but by the opinion about the things.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“A city is not adorned by external things, but by the virtue of those who dwell in it.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“As the sun does not wait for prayers and incantations tob e induced to rise, but immediately shines and is saluted by all, so do you also not wait for clappings of hands and shouts of praise tob e induced to do good, but be a doer of good voluntarily and you will be beloved as much as the sun.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“The condition and characteristic of an uninstructed person is this: he never expects from himself profit (advantage) nor harm, but from externals. The condition and characteristic of a philosopher is this: he expects all advantage and all harm from himself.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“When you do anything from a clear judgment that it ought to be done, never shrink from being seen to do it, even though the world should misunderstand it; for if you are not acting rightly, shun the action itself; if you are, why fear those who wrongly censure you?”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“Fortify yourself with contentment for this is an impregnable fortress.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
“He who exercises wisdom, exercises the knowledge which is about God.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion and Selections from the Discourses
tags: god, widsom
“When then any man assents to that which is false, be assured that he did not intend to assent to it as false, for every soul is unwillingly deprived of the truth, as Plato says; but the falsity seemed to him to be true.”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“If then you desire (aim at) such great things remember that you must not (attempt to) lay hold of them with a small effort;”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“In short, if we observe, we shall find that the animal man is pained by nothing so much as by that which is irrational; and, on the contrary, attracted to nothing so much as to that which is rational.”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“Epictetus is not superior to Socrates; but if he is not inferior, this is enough for me; for I shall never be a Milo, and yet I do not neglect my body; nor shall I be a Croesus, and yet I do not neglect my property; nor, in a word, do we neglect looking after anything because we despair of reaching the highest degree.”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“For it is always true that to whatever point the perfecting of anything leads us, progress is an approach towards this point.”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“What is the product of virtue? Tranquillity.”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“But if with trembling and lamentation you seek not to fall into that which you avoid, tell me how you are improving.”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“For what else is tragedy than the perturbations ([Greek: pathae]) of men who value externals exhibited in this kind of poetry?”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion
“If a man, said Epictetus, opposes evident truths, it is not easy to find arguments by which we shall make him change his opinion. But this does not arise either from the man's strength or the teacher's weakness; for when the man, though he has been confuted, is hardened like a stone, how shall we then be able to deal with him by argument?”
Epictetus, A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion