The Effective Executive Quotes

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The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done by Peter F. Drucker
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The Effective Executive Quotes Showing 1-30 of 139
“It is more productive to convert an opportunity into results than to solve a problem - which only restores the equilibrium of yesterday.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done
“Intelligence, imagination, and knowledge are essential resources, but only effectiveness converts them into results.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Working on the right things is what makes knowledge work effective.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Effective executives know that their subordinates are paid to perform and not to please their superiors.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Meetings are by definition a concession to deficient organization For one either meets or one works. One cannot do both at the same time.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Converting a decision into action requires answering several distinct questions: Who has to know of this decision? What action has to be taken? Who is to take it? And what does the action have to be so that the people who have to do it can do it? The first and the last of these are too often overlooked—with dire results.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Effectiveness must be learned.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“If there is any one “secret” of effectiveness, it is concentration. Effective executives do first things first and they do one thing at a time.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“The focus on contribution by itself supplies the four basic requirements of effective human relations: communications; teamwork; self-development; and development of others.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“All military services have long ago learned that the officer who has given an order goes out and sees for himself whether it has been carried out. At the least he sends one of his own aides—he never relies on what he is told by the subordinate to whom the order was given. Not that he distrusts the subordinate; he has learned from experience to distrust communications.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“If the executive lets the flow of events determine what he does, what he works on, and what he takes seriously, he will fritter himself away “operating.” He may be an excellent man. But he is certain to waste his knowledge and ability and to throw away what little effectiveness he might have achieved. What the executive needs are criteria which enable him to work on the truly important, that is, on contributions and results, even though the criteria are not found in the flow of events.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“a decision without an alternative is a desperate gambler’s throw,”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“plan, organize, integrate, motivate, and measure.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“The people who get nothing done often work a great deal harder. In the first place, they underestimate the time for any one task. They always expect that everything will go right. Yet, as every executive knows, nothing ever goes right. The unexpected always happens—the unexpected is indeed the only thing one can confidently expect.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“The first rule in decision-making is that one does not make a decision unless there is disagreement.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“By themselves, character and integrity do not accomplish anything. But their absence faults everything else. Here, therefore, is the one area where weakness is a disqualification by itself rather than a limitation on performance capacity and strength.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“One cannot hire a hand—the whole man always comes with it,”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“There is no such thing as a “good man.” Good for what? is the question.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Is this still worth doing?” And if it isn’t, he gets rid of it so as to be able to concentrate on the few tasks that, if done with excellence, will really make a difference in the results of his own job and in the performance of his organization.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“A well-managed factory is boring. Nothing exciting happens in it because the crises have been anticipated and have been converted into routine.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“The less an organization has to do to produce results, the better it does its job.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Today is always the result of actions and decisions taken yesterday. Man, however, whatever his title or rank, cannot foresee the future. Yesterday’s actions and decisions, no matter how courageous or wise they may have been, inevitably become today’s problems,”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“We know very little about self-development. But we do know one thing: People in general, and knowledge workers in particular, grow according to the demands they make on themselves. They grow according to what they consider to be achievement and attainment. If they demand little of themselves, they will remain stunted. If they demand a good deal of themselves, they will grow to giant stature--without any more effort than is expended by the non-achievers.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done
“Two hundred people, of course, can do a great deal more work than one man. But it does not follow that they produce and contribute more.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“People in general, and knowledge workers in particular, grow according to the demands they make on themselves. They grow according to what they consider to be achievement and attainment. If they demand little of themselves, they will remain stunted. If they demand a good deal of themselves, they will grow to giant stature—without any more effort than is expended by the nonachievers.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Brilliant men are often strikingly ineffectual; they fail to realize that the brilliant insight is not by itself achievement. They never have learned that insights become effectiveness only through hard systematic work.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done
“People inevitably start out with an opinion; to ask them to search for the facts first is even undesirable. They will simply do what everyone is far too prone to do anyhow: look for the facts that fit the conclusion they have already reached.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Good follow-up is just as important as the meeting itself. The great master of follow-up was Alfred Sloan, the most effective business executive I have ever known. Sloan, who headed General Motors from the 1920s until the 1950s, spent most of his six working days a week in meetings—three days a week in formal committee meetings with a set membership, the other three days in ad hoc meetings with individual GM executives or with a small group of executives. At the beginning of a formal meeting, Sloan announced the meeting’s purpose. He then listened. He never took notes and he rarely spoke except to clarify a confusing point. At the end he summed up, thanked the participants, and left. Then he immediately wrote a short memo addressed to one attendee of the meeting. In that note, he summarized the discussion and its conclusions and spelled out any work assignment decided upon in the meeting (including a decision to hold another meeting on the subject or to study an issue). He specified the deadline and the executive who was to be accountable for the assignment. He sent a copy of the memo to everyone who’d been present at the meeting. It was through these memos—each a small masterpiece—that Sloan made himself into an outstandingly effective executive.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done
“The danger is that executives will become contemptuous of information and stimulus that cannot be reduced to computer logic and computer language. Executives may become blind to everything that is perception (i.e., event) rather than fact (i.e., after the event). The tremendous amount of computer information may thus shut out access to reality.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive
“Structuring jobs to fit personality is almost certain to lead to favoritism and conformity. And no organization can afford either. It needs equity and impersonal fairness in its personnel decisions. Or else it will either lose its good people or destroy their incentive. And it needs diversity. Or else it will lack the ability to change and the ability for dissent which (as Chapter 7 will discuss) the right decision demands.”
Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive

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