14 Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
14 (Threshold, #1) 14 by Peter Clines
28,584 ratings, 3.95 average rating, 3,405 reviews
Open Preview
14 Quotes Showing 1-30 of 66
“Hung herself in the closet."
"Hanged," said Nate.
"Don't be one of those people.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Nate had realized a while back that nobody talked with each other at such gatherings. People just took turns talking at each other. He never got the sense anyone was listening.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Nobody sane loves working in an office, It’s against human nature to be locked up in a cubicle all day long.”
Peter Clines, 14
“It had a bow tie.” “Hey,” Clive said, “bow ties are cool.”
Peter Clines, 14
“I respect your beliefs Andrew, and I'm glad they make you happy. But I'm not up here to be lectured at or spoken down to. Clear?”
Peter Clines, 14
“A ladder's a flag pole with delusions of grandeur.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Malavika Vishwanath. Don't try to say it you'll just piss me off.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Koturovic somehow came up with the idea there were some kind of creatures—big, smart, scary alpha predators—living in these higher dimensions. Telepathically-sensitive people sensed them all through history and that’s where all our myths about demons and monsters come from. It’s their presence leaking through. When the dimensional barriers were shattered, according to him, these things would come through and eat everything they could until the barriers reasserted themselves. Kind of the universe’s method of population control.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Bro," said Roger. "You're a time traveler."
"No, I'm not," said Nate.
"Not yet, but maybe in the future.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Maybe there's a computer down in the basement," she said, "and we need to keep punching the numbers in.”
Peter Clines, 14
tags: humor
“66–16–9—4—1—89 He glanced at her. “What do you think it means?” “Maybe there’s a computer down in the basement,” she said, “and we need to keep punching the numbers in.” “Very funny,” said Nate.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Roger nodded. “Right. Getting stuff done to your brain makes your nose bleed. I read that in a book once.” “You read a book?” said Veek. “Wait for it…” said Roger. “Annnnd...fuck you.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Cattle... it called us cattle...

We're hamburger, you mean.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Fred always goes with Daphne and Shaggy always sticks with Velma."
"Well then, in that case, I'm Scooby.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Come on.” “Where are we going?” “Across the street,” she said, opening the gate. “What for?” “I told you, it’s better if you figure it out on your own.” “Right,” he muttered. “No one can be told what the Matrix is.” She smirked. “Something like that.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Fuck me,” said Roger. He spit a mouthful of stomach acid into the hall and looked at the bodies. “Look at the old man, going all Bruce Willis on us.”
Peter Clines, 14
“What the fuck are cavemen doing here?”
Peter Clines, 14
“I've got a thing about heights."
Nate glanced at her. "I thought you had a thing about bugs?"
"I've got more than one thing, it's allowed."
"You were okay up in the loft, said Debbie.
"Because the loft is a nice big space with guard rails," Veek said. "A ladder's a flag pole with delusions of grandeur.”
Peter Clines, 14
“You were okay up in the loft,” said Debbie. “Because the loft is a nice big space with guard rails,” Veek said. “A ladder’s a flagpole with delusions of grandeur.”
Peter Clines, 14
“You are ones who haff been making all the noise?” A man stood by the stairs, half-silhouetted by the light pouring through the hallway window. He was short, bald, and round. “Yeah,” said Nate. “Sorry about that.” The man nodded once. “One of you is Mister Nathan Tucker?” “That’s me.” He nodded again. “I am Oskar Rommel.” His accent turned the S into a Z and emphasized the K. “I am the building manager.” “Nice to meet you.” “Nice to meet you,” he parroted. He stepped into better light and features appeared on his face. He had bushy eyebrows and a mustache like a comb. The hairy arms hanging out of his wifebeater were thick with slabs of muscle that had gone soft. Nate guessed the man was pushing sixty. “The elefator does not work.”
Peter Clines, 14
“His jaw still ached from Andrew’s backhand. Clive tapped one of his molars with his tongue for the umpteenth time and felt it shift ever-so-slightly under the probe.”
Peter Clines, 14
“It had gotten dark while he worked in the main room of the studio. He felt the wall of the kitchen and failed to locate the light switch. It took him a minute, but he spotted it in the spill of light from the other room. A two-switch panel sat three feet from the doorway, just far enough away to be awkward.”
Peter Clines, 14
“The man had his hands up covering his eyes, more in a gesture of mild frustration than any sort of protection. His solid arms and broad chest were the kind that came from constant labor, not days at the gym. He wasn’t much taller than Nate. An inch or two at the most. Nate was aware, though, of the difference between being five-ten and being six feet tall. It was far more than just two inches.”
Peter Clines, 14
“He heard a rustling noise. A cockroach with a body as long as his ring finger scurried up onto one of the heaters. It was a bright green roachasaurus, the granddaddy of the one he’d seen in his apartment that first day. Its tiny claws pinged and scraped on the metal surface. It was always wrong when the pests got so big you could hear them walking.”
Peter Clines, 14
“He headed down to the stairwell and followed it up the extra flight to the roof. There was a metal fire door with a crash bar on it. Posted on the wall next to the door was a list of rules for using the sun deck which seemed to amount to don’t be a dick about it. A note was stuck to the metal door with a blue X, one of the magnetic letters kids used on the fridge.”
Peter Clines, 14
“He moved and his shadow fell across her face. She smiled and pushed the sunglasses onto the top of her head. Her eyes were bright blue, too. She tapped his leg with her foot. “Thanks. That’s better.” She took a good look at him. “So, what do you do, Nate?” “Do?” “For a living. For fun. To make life interesting.”
Peter Clines, 14
“It was a warm day. Almost hot. He guessed it was part of the reason he’d slept so well. He stretched again and glanced at the clock. It was twenty past twelve. Still, it wasn’t like he had big plans for the day. If he could find a Target or Walmart in the area, he might get a new lamp for the kitchen, or maybe a— Stop by my apartment tomorrow at noon and I’ll give you a password. Don’t be late. “Ahhh, crap,” he muttered.”
Peter Clines, 14
“Veek popped another can of Diet Pepsi and took a sip. “I tried asking Oskar about it when I first saw it, during my denial week. He got annoyed and told me I was being foolish. So I tried to come up with a rational explanation and couldn’t. When I went back to him he gave me this whole spiel about what a great deal the apartments here are, how much the owners like it being a quiet place, can’t I just be happy with it, all that sort of stuff. Then he told me if I tried to make a fuss out of this and become a disruptive influence, he’d have to ask me to move out. With deductions to my deposit, of course.”
Peter Clines, 14
“He heard the frown again and the tapping of computer keys. “You said you’re in Los Angeles?”
Peter Clines, 14
“She blew some annoyed air onto the phone and the mouse clicked again. “The Kavach Building?”
Peter Clines, 14

« previous 1 3