The Wisdom of No Escape Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World by Pema Chödrön
4,929 ratings, 4.38 average rating, 231 reviews
Open Preview
The Wisdom of No Escape Quotes Showing 1-30 of 75
“There is a story of a woman running away from tigers. She runs and runs and the tigers are getting closer and closer. When she comes to the edge of a cliff, she sees some vines there, so she climbs down and holds on to the vines. Looking down, she sees that there are tigers below her as well. She then notices that a mouse is gnawing away at the vine to which she is clinging. She also sees a beautiful little bunch of strawberries close to her, growing out of a clump of grass. She looks up and she looks down. She looks at the mouse. Then she just takes a strawberry, puts it in her mouth, and enjoys it thoroughly. Tigers above, tigers below. This is actually the predicament that we are always in, in terms of our birth and death. Each moment is just what it is. It might be the only moment of our life; it might be the only strawberry we’ll ever eat. We could get depressed about it, or we could finally appreciate it and delight in the preciousness of every single moment of our life.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Meditation practice isn't about trying to throw ourselves away and become something better. It's about befriending who we are already.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“The truth you believe in and cling to makes you unavailable to hear anything new.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“People find it quite easy to have beliefs and to hold on to them and to let their whole world be a product of their belief system. They also find it quite easy to attack those who disagree. The harder, more courageous thing, which the hero and the heroine, the warrior, and the mystic do, is continually to look one’s beliefs straight in the face, honestly and clearly, and then step beyond them. That requires a lot of heart and kindness. It requires being able to touch and know completely, to the core, your own experience, without harshness, without making any judgment.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“One of the main discoveries of meditation is seeing how we continually run away from the present moment, how we avoid being here just as we are.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Life’s work is to wake up, to let the things that enter into the circle wake you up rather than put you to sleep. The only way to do this is to open, be curious, and develop some sense of sympathy for everything that comes along, to get to know its nature and let it teach you what it will. It’s going to stick around until you learn your lesson, at any rate.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Resentment, bitterness, and holding a grudge prevent us from seeing and hearing and tasting and delighting.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And The Path of Loving-Kindness: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“When thoughts come up, touch them very lightly, like a feather touching a bubble. Let the whole thing be soft and gentle, but at the same time precise.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving-Kindness
“A much more interesting, kind, adventurous, and joyful approach to life is to begin to develop curiosity, not caring whether the object of our inquisitiviness is bitter or sweet.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“you’re never going to get your act together, fully, completely.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And The Path of Loving-Kindness: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“It's very helpful to realize that being here, sitting in meditation, doing simple everyday things like working, walking outside, talking with people, bathing, using the toilet, and eating, is actually all that we need to be fully awake, fully alive, fully human.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“The problem is that the desire to change is fundamentally a form of aggression toward yourself. The other problem is that our hangups, unfortunately or fortunately, contain our wealth. Our neurosis and our wisdom are made out of the same material. If you throw out your neurosis, you also throw out your wisdom. Someone who is very angry also has a lot of energy; that energy is what’s so juicy about him or her. That’s the reason people love that person. The idea isn’t to try to get rid of your anger, but to make friends with it, to see it clearly with precision and honesty, and also to see it with gentleness. That means not judging yourself as a bad person, but also not bolstering yourself up by saying, “It’s good that I’m this way, it’s right that I’m this way. Other people are terrible, and I’m right to be so angry at them all the time.” The gentleness involves not repressing the anger but also not acting it out. It is something much softer and more openhearted than any of that. It involves learning how, once you have fully acknowledged the feeling of anger and the knowledge of who you are and what you do, to let it go. You can let go of the usual pitiful little story line that accompanies anger and begin to see clearly how you keep the whole thing going. So whether it’s anger or craving or jealousy or fear or depression—whatever it might be—the notion is not to try to get rid of it, but to make friends with it. That means getting to know it completely, with some kind of softness, and learning how, once you’ve experienced it fully, to let go. The”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving-Kindness
“When you meet the Buddha, kill the Buddha” means that when you see that you’re grasping or clinging to anything, whether conventionally it’s called good or bad, make friends with that. Look into it. Get to know it completely and utterly. In that way it will let go of itself.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving Kindness
“While we are sitting in meditation, we are simply exploring humanity and all of creation in the form of ourselves.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“I N TAOISM there’s a famous saying that goes, “The Tao that can be spoken is not the ultimate Tao.” Another way you could say that, although I’ve never seen it translated this way, is, “As soon as you begin to believe in something, then you can no longer see anything else.” The truth you believe in and cling to makes you unavailable to hear anything new.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving-Kindness
“There's a common misunderstanding among all the human beings who have ever been born on the earth that the best way to live is to try to avoid pain and just try to get comfortable.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Our neurosis and our wisdom are made out of the same material.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And The Path of Loving-Kindness: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“nobody but yourself can tell you what to accept and what to reject.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And The Path of Loving-Kindness: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Once I had an opportunity to talk with Chogyam Trungpa, Rinpoche, about the fact that I was not able to do my practice properly. I had just started the vajrayana practices and I was supposed to be visualizing. I couldn't visualize anything. I tried and tried but there was just nothing at all; I felt like a fraud doing the practice because it didn't feel natural to me. (...). So he encouraged me by saying that as long as you have these kinds of doubts, your practice will be good.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“In his talk, Suzuki Roshi says that meditation and the whole process of finding your own true nature is one continuous mistake, and that rather than that being a reason for depression or discouragement, it's actually the motivation.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“There is a story of a woman running away from tigers. She runs and runs, and the tigers are getting closer and closer. When she comes to the edge of a cliff, she sees some vines there, so she climbs down and holds on to the vines. Looking down, she sees that there are tigers below her as well. She then notices that a mouse is gnawing away at the vine to which she is clinging. She also sees a beautiful little bunch of strawberries close to her, growing out of a clump of grass. She looks up and she looks down. She looks at the mouse. Then she takes a strawberry, puts it in her mouth, and enjoys it thoroughly.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving-Kindness
“We're here to get to know and study ourselves. The path, the way to do that, our main vehicle, is going to be meditation, and some sense of general wakefulness.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“loving-kindness—maitri—toward ourselves doesn’t mean getting rid of anything. Maitri means that we can still be crazy after all these years. We can still be angry after all these years. We can still be timid or jealous or full of feelings of unworthiness. The point is not to try to change ourselves. Meditation practice isn’t about trying to throw ourselves away and become something better. It’s about befriending who we are already. The ground of practice is you or me or whoever we are right now, just as we are. That’s the ground, that’s what we study, that’s what we come to know with tremendous curiosity and interest. Sometimes”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving-Kindness
“The first noble truth says simply that it’s part of being human to feel discomfort.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Even though there are so many teachings, so many meditations, so many instructions, the basic point of it all is just to learn to be extremely honest and also wholehearted about what exists in your mind - thoughts, emotions bodily sensations, the whole thing that adds up to what we call "me" or "I".”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving Kindness
“This meditation is called nontheistic, which doesn't have anything to do with believing in God or not believing in God, but means that nobody but yourself can tell you what to accept and what to reject.
The practice of meditation helps us to get to know this basic energy really well, with tremendous honesty and warmheartedness, and we begin to figure out for ourselves what is poison and what is medicin, which means something different for each of us.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving Kindness
“Wherever you go for the rest of your life, you're always in the middle of the universe and the circle is always around you. Everyone who walks up to you has entered that scared space, and it's not an accident. Whatever comes into the space is there to teach you.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“Whatever you’re given can wake you up or put you to sleep. That’s the challenge of now: What are you going to do with what you have already—your body, your speech, your mind?”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“The path of meditation and the path of our lives altogether ha to do with curiosity, inquisitiveness.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World
“soften, to connect with your heart and engender a basic attitude of generosity and compassion toward yourself, the archetypal coward.”
Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape: And The Path of Loving-Kindness: How to Love Yourself and Your World

« previous 1 3