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On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings by Friedrich Nietzsche
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On Truth and Untruth Quotes Showing 1-19 of 19
“In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented knowledge. That was the haughtiest and most mendacious minute of "world history"- yet only a minute. After nature had drawn a few breaths the star grew cold, and the clever animals had to die.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“truths are illusions of which one has forgotten that they are illusions, metaphors that have become worn-out and deprived of their sensuous force, coins that have lost their imprint and are now no longer seen as coins but as metal.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“In irgendeinem abgelegenen Winkel des in zahllosen Sonnensystemen flimmernd ausgegossenen Weltalls, gab es einmal ein Gestirn, auf dem kluge Tiere das Erkennen erfanden. Es war die hochmütigste und verlogenste Minute der 'Weltgeschichte': aber doch nur eine Minute. Nach wenigen Atemzügen der Natur erstarrte das Gestirn, und die klugen Tiere mussten sterben. - So könnte jemand eine Fabel erfinden und würde doch nicht genügend illustriert haben, wie kläglich, wie schattenhaft und flüchtig, wie zwecklos und beliebig sich der menschliche Intellekt innerhalb der Natur ausnimmt; es gab Ewigkeiten, in denen er nicht war; wenn es wieder mit ihm vorbei ist, wird sich nichts begeben haben. Denn es gibt für jenen Intellekt keine weitere Mission, die über das Menschenleben hinausführte. Sondern Menschlich ist er, und nur sein Besitzer und Erzeuger nimmt ihn so pathetisch, als ob die Angeln der Welt sich in ihm drehten. Könnten wie uns aber mit der Mücke verständigen, so würden wir vernehmen, dass auch sie mit diesem Pathos durch die Luft schwimmt und in sich das fliegende Zentrum dieser Welt fühlt.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense
“All that is proper to man, however, is faith in the attainable truth, in the ever approaching, confidence-inspiring illusion. Does he not in fact live by constant deception? Doesn’t nature conceal virtually everything from him, even what is nearest, for example, his own body, of which he has only a spurious “consciousness"? He is locked up in this consciousness, and nature has thrown away the key.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“he does not wear a twitching, mobile, human face, but rather a mask, as it were, with its features in dignified equilibrium; he does not shout, nor does he even change his tone of voice. If a veritable storm-cloud empties itself on his head, he wraps himself in his cloak and slowly walks away from under it.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“the illusion of the artistic rendering of a nerve stimulus into images is, if not the mother, then at least the grandmother of every concept. In”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“Pascal is right to assert that if we had the same dream every night, we would be as engaged by it as we are by the things we see every day. “If an artisan were sure of dreaming every night a full twelve hours that he was king, I believe,” says Pascal, “he would be just as happy as a king who dreamed every night for twelve hours that he was an artisan.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“Even on this level, it is at bottom not deception [men] hate but the dire, inimical consequences of certain kinds of deception”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“Perhaps no one has yet been truthful enough about what 'truthfulness' is.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“The more abstract the truth you want to teach, the more you must seduce the senses to it.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“That a belief, however necessary it may be for the preservation of a creature, has nothing to do with truth, one can see, for example, in the fact that we have to believe in time, space, and motion, but without feeling constrained to grant them absolute reality.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“the nature of animal consciousness is such that the world we can be conscious of is only a world of surfaces and signs, a world generalized, made common—that everything that becomes conscious thereby becomes flat, thin, relatively stupid, general, a sign, a herd signal; that all coming to conscious involves a vast and thoroughgoing corruption, falsification, superficialization, and generalization. Heightened”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“the waking day of a mythically vibrant people, the ancient Greeks, for instance, is in fact more akin to dream than to the day of a sober scientific thinker. If”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“All our actions are at bottom incomparably personal, unique, endlessly individual, there is no doubt; but as soon as we translate them into consciousness, they no longer seem so …”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“How we, too, are still pious.—In science, convictions have no right of citizenship, so it is said and with good reason: only when they decide to descend to the modesty of a hypothesis, a provisional experimental standpoint, a regulative fiction, may they be granted admission and even a certain value in the realm of knowledge—though always with the restriction of remaining under police surveillance, under police suspicion. But,”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“Art is mightier than knowledge, for it wants life, and knowledge attains as its ultimate end only—annihilation.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“We work only with things that don’t exist, with lines, planes, bodies, atoms, units of time, units of space—how is explanation even possible if we begin by making everything into an image, our image! It”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“We think we know something about the things themselves when we speak of trees, colors, snow, and flowers, yet we possess only metaphors of the things, which in no way correspond to the original essences. Just”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings
“It would be something else again to assert that there are x worlds, i.e., every possible world besides this one. But that has never been asserted …”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Untruth: Selected Writings