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The Answer by John Assaraf
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Real Magic by Wayne W. Dyer
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Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar
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The Road to Reality by Roger Penrose
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Tragedy and Hope by Carroll Quigley
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Sex Matters by Mona Charen
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The Coddling of the American Mind by Greg Lukianoff
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The Atoning One by Robert L. Millet
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The New Copernicans by John Seel
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The Third Door by Alex Banayan
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More of Ryan's books…
Benjamin Franklin
“I grew convinc'd that truth, sincerity and integrity in dealings between man and man were of the utmost importance to the felicity of life;”
Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin
“But on the whole, though I never arrived at the perfection I had been so ambitious of obtaining, but fell far short of it, yet I was, by the endeavour, a better and happier man than I otherwise should have been had I not attempted it; as those who aim at perfect writing by imitating the engraved copies, their hand is mended by the endevour, and is tolerable while it continues fair and legible”
Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin
“Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations get corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”
Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Daniel H. Pink
“While complying can be an effective strategy
for physical survival, it's a lousy one for personal fulfillment. Living a satisfying life requires more than simply meeting the demands of those in
control. Yet in our offices and our classrooms we have way too much compliance and way too little engagement. The former might get you
through the day, but only the latter will get you through the night.”
Daniel H. Pink

Benjamin Franklin
“I found this method safest for myself and very embarrassing to those against whom I used it; therefore I took a delight in it, practis'd it continually, and grew very artful and expert in drawing people, even of superior knowledge, into concessions, the consequences of which they did not foresee, entangling them in difficulties out of which they could not extricate themselves, and so obtaining victories that neither myself nor my cause always deserved. I continu'd this method some few years, but gradually left it, retaining only the habit of expressing myself in terms of modest diffidence; never using, when I advanced any thing that may possibly be disputed, the words certainly, undoubtedly, or any others that give the air of positiveness to an opinion; but rather say, I conceive or apprehend a thing to be so and so; it appears to me, or I should think it so or so, for such and such reasons; or I imagine it to be so; or it is so, if I am not mistaken. This habit, I believe, has been of great advantage to me when I have had occasion to inculcate my opinions, and persuade men into measures that I have been from time to time engag'd in promoting; and, as the chief ends of conversation are to inform or to be informed, to please or to persuade, I wish well-meaning, sensible men would not lessen their power of doing good by a positive, assuming manner, that seldom fails to disgust, tends to create opposition, and to defeat every one of those purposes for which speech was given to us, to wit, giving or receiving information or pleasure. For, if you would inform, a positive and dogmatical manner in advancing your sentiments may provoke contradiction and prevent a candid attention. If you wish information and improvement from the knowledge of others, and yet at the same time express yourself as firmly fix'd in your present opinions, modest, sensible men, who do not love disputation, will probably leave you undisturbed in the possession of your error. And by such a manner, you can seldom hope to recommend yourself in pleasing your hearers, or to persuade those whose concurrence you desire. Pope says, judiciously:           "Men should be taught as if you taught them not,           And things unknown propos'd as things forgot;" farther recommending to us "To speak, tho' sure, with seeming diffidence.”
Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

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