Best Books to Become an Informed Voter

What does a citizen need to read to be an informed voter in 2008 or 2012, or just to be an informed citizen?
1

by
4.55 avg rating — 21,938 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
2

by
4.45 avg rating — 18,382 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
3

by
4.06 avg rating — 31,271 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
4

by
4.08 avg rating — 153,693 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
5

by
4.24 avg rating — 1,584 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
6

by
4.14 avg rating — 6,800 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
7

by
4.01 avg rating — 19,874 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
8

by
4.16 avg rating — 2,417,498 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
9

by
3.68 avg rating — 320,295 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
10

by
3.72 avg rating — 121,847 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
11

by
3.90 avg rating — 2,232,286 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
12

by
4.18 avg rating — 15,684 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
13

by
3.96 avg rating — 11,085 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
14

by
4.23 avg rating — 31,193 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
15

by
4.30 avg rating — 6,210 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
16

by
4.28 avg rating — 125,326 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
17

by
3.61 avg rating — 164,666 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
18

by
3.98 avg rating — 5,721 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
19

by
3.84 avg rating — 10,370 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
20

by
3.80 avg rating — 207,853 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
21

by
4.39 avg rating — 8,845 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
22

by
3.94 avg rating — 8,910 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
23

by
4.27 avg rating — 6,292 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
24

by
4.07 avg rating — 3,779 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
25

by
3.88 avg rating — 23,259 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
26

by
3.81 avg rating — 6,709 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
27

by
3.92 avg rating — 137,100 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
28

by
3.54 avg rating — 83,143 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
29

by
4.16 avg rating — 6,756 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
30

by
3.77 avg rating — 6,811 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
31

by
3.95 avg rating — 24,236 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
32

by
4.07 avg rating — 3,158 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
33

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5,005 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
34

by
4.12 avg rating — 2,335 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
35

by
4.04 avg rating — 5,171 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
36

by
3.95 avg rating — 2,822 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
37

by
4.53 avg rating — 1,879 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
38

by
4.28 avg rating — 323 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
39

by
3.84 avg rating — 28,860 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
40

by
3.90 avg rating — 197,263 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
41

by
3.68 avg rating — 89,929 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
42

by
4.02 avg rating — 4,834 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
43

by
4.01 avg rating — 3,145 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
44

by
4.22 avg rating — 49,159 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
45

by
4.33 avg rating — 1,731 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
46

by
3.77 avg rating — 307 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
47

by
3.76 avg rating — 16,751 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
48

by
4.02 avg rating — 1,266 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
49

by
4.26 avg rating — 3,737,240 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
50

by
4.06 avg rating — 14,532 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
51

by
3.98 avg rating — 1,202,332 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
52

by
4.07 avg rating — 16,135 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
53

by
3.76 avg rating — 3,869 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
54

by
4.15 avg rating — 7,773 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
55

by
4.27 avg rating — 113,563 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
56

by
4.26 avg rating — 2,046 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
57

by
4.23 avg rating — 12,273 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
58

by
3.97 avg rating — 10,584 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
59

by
3.92 avg rating — 36,467 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
60

by
3.80 avg rating — 3,163 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
61

by
4.22 avg rating — 6,319 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
62

by
3.92 avg rating — 9,442 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
63

by
3.91 avg rating — 4,790 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
64

by
3.98 avg rating — 1,641 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
65

by
4.25 avg rating — 1,439 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
66

by
4.13 avg rating — 1,751 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
67

by
4.21 avg rating — 624 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
68

by
4.12 avg rating — 2,287,045 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
69

by
4.16 avg rating — 2,069 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
70

by
4.18 avg rating — 929 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
71

by
4.09 avg rating — 954,276 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
72

by
3.71 avg rating — 24 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
73

by
3.85 avg rating — 491 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
74

by
3.56 avg rating — 276,423 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
75

by
4.30 avg rating — 121 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
76

by
4.37 avg rating — 68,636 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
77

by
4.20 avg rating — 20,506 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
78

by
4.14 avg rating — 3,333 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
79

by
3.98 avg rating — 1,321,179 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
80

by
3.95 avg rating — 3,862 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
81

by
3.79 avg rating — 2,811 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
82

by
3.94 avg rating — 3,601 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
83

by
4.30 avg rating — 2,478 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
84

by
4.21 avg rating — 11,983 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
84

by
4.07 avg rating — 2,103 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
86

by
4.26 avg rating — 722 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
87

by
3.78 avg rating — 4,522 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
88

by
3.88 avg rating — 1,790 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
89

by
3.92 avg rating — 2,949 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
90

by
3.82 avg rating — 7,309 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
91

by
4.06 avg rating — 159,408 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
92

by
3.83 avg rating — 728 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
93

by
4.25 avg rating — 733 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
94

by
3.52 avg rating — 2,038 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
95

by
4.09 avg rating — 80 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
96

by
3.87 avg rating — 3,519 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
97

by
3.73 avg rating — 116,728 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
98

by
3.96 avg rating — 178 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
99

by
4.07 avg rating — 189 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
100

by
3.80 avg rating — 1,458 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
flag this list (?)
818 books · 981 voters · list created July 2nd, 2008 by Donna (votes) .
310 likes · 
Lists are re-scored approximately every 5 minutes.


Donna 3272 books
270 friends
Pat 933 books
234 friends
Lisa 227 books
71 friends
Steven 1859 books
2225 friends
Miss 36 books
0 friends
Brian 195 books
16 friends
Don 1484 books
118 friends
Jami 2124 books
57 friends

More voters…


Comments Showing 1-50 of 55 (55 new)


message 1: by Angel (new)

Angel This is an interesting list. I can think of some titles I would add, which I will come back later and put in. The idea behind the list, books to be an informed voter, is definitely great. Whatever your political party or affiliation (in the US), you need to read some of these.


message 2: by M (new)

M This is an interesting list to be an informed citizen of this World.


message 3: by Cooki (new)

Cooki Inglove The New Yorker


message 4: by John (last edited Aug 15, 2009 02:55PM) (new)

John Burns Wow, only 1 chomsky book and that's at 41. This is a remarkably tame set of books.

Glenn beck, the bible. Jesus christ.


message 5: by Travis (new)

Travis Yeah, a lot of these would have the opposite effect of informing a voter. Instead of informing people of the truth and the issues, many of these just inform the reader of one partisan groups incredibly bias opinions and the half truths and misinformation they use to support their agendas.


message 6: by Chamko (new)

Chamko Where is the "Shock Doctrine" by Naomi Klein and "The Wrecking Crew" by Thomas Frank and many others? This is a very very limited list.


message 7: by Jim (new)

Jim Our country is based on the Bible, like it or not. Read it sometime and you will become an informed voter.


message 8: by c (new)

c Should be renamed "Best Books to Become an Informed Voter in America". Very little of this applies to the rest of the world.


message 9: by Zach (last edited Dec 27, 2010 05:57PM) (new)

Zach Vaughn As a graduate with a degree in polisci, I wouldn't consider most of these books to be very informative (mostly opinion/commentary), so I added the following:

Deficit Politics Public Budgeting in Its Institutional and Historical Context (New Topics in Politics) by Donald F. Kettl The Price of Liberty Paying for America's Wars by Robert D. Hormats The Power Game How Washington Works by Hedrick Smith Lines in the Sand Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom DeLay by Steve Bickerstaff Aristotle and an Aardvark Go to Washington Understanding Political Doublespeak Through Philosophy and Jokes by Thomas Cathcart The Irony of American History (Scribner Library of Contemporary Classics) by Reinhold Niebuhr


message 10: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 01, 2011 10:00AM) (new)

The lack of philosophical works on this list makes it beyond deplorable. It's mostly just a collection of partisan pamphlets that serve only to keep citizens short-sighted, bigoted, and unworthy to participate in anything resembling a democratic process. To rank journalists, pamphleteers, sensationalist polemicists, and partisan hacks like Thomas Paine, Richard Dawkins, Glen Beck, Howard Zinn and Al Gore as significant authors for an "informed voter" betrays the terribly obvious lack of understanding of a very uninformed individual.

I was pleased to see some Cicero, Locke, and de Tocqueville on the list, but with no consideration given to Plato, Aquinas, Hobbes, and dozens of other very important thinkers, this list is very incomplete.

Since I think a good list of important books should be brief, I chose three already on the list (The U.S. Constitution, The Federalist Papers, and The Bell-Curve) and added two more:

City of God by Aurelius Augustinus Republic by Plato


message 11: by Gabriel (last edited Jan 21, 2012 07:32PM) (new)

Gabriel Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity on this list? God, no.

And Ayn Rand? Really?


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Gabriel wrote: "Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity on this list? God, no.

And Ayn Rand? Really?"


I had very similar thoughts.


message 13: by James (new)

James Our country wasn't based on the Bible (maybe The Jefferson Bible); however, a lot of people these days seem to think it was.


message 14: by Dante (new)

Dante Ferrigno James wrote: "Our country wasn't based on the Bible (maybe The Jefferson Bible); however, a lot of people these days seem to think it was."
James, may I suggest a book for you? Please read, "The Jefferson Lies" by David Barton. I promise you won't regret it :)


message 15: by Dante (new)

Dante Ferrigno Max wrote: "Should be renamed "Best Books to Become an Informed Voter in America". Very little of this applies to the rest of the world."

Very true.


message 16: by James (last edited Jul 05, 2012 10:25PM) (new)

James I already regret seeing the author's interview on The Daily Show.


message 17: by Nate (last edited Aug 14, 2012 09:25PM) (new)

Nate may I suggest a book for you? Please read, "The Jefferson Lies..."

I felt like that author is sort of on the fringe debating others on the polar opposite fringe. The lies he breaks down in each chapter are not held by any historian of credibility; most were lame rumors that were dismissed scores ago. His book seemed to counter obscure blog writers (what a group) and to push viewpoints that fit his own belief system rather than historical fact. I would not recommend that as a book someone should read, since I'm not sure what you can really gain from it.


message 18: by Nate (new)

Nate I think the list is a nice reference point; I've used it a few times to check out books that I've never heard of.

I don't think anyone should worry about the rankings though. The difference between being in the top fifty or ranked dead last: 5 votes.


message 19: by James (new)

James Re: The Jefferson Lies, http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2012/08...

"After the internal review of Barton's book, Hampton said, 'We became convinced there were parts of the book that were not historically supported.'"


message 20: by Nate (new)

Nate Wow, the publisher pulled the book because of the inaccuracies-I've never even heard of such a thing. Thanks for the link.


message 22: by David (new)

David the holy bible and the book of mormon? really??? people, you know America is not a Christian nation, right? There's a little thing called freedom of religion...


message 23: by Dante (new)

Dante Ferrigno You're absolutely right David, America is not a Christian nation. America does make law freedom of religion, but what you do not understand is that it wouldn't be so if it wasn't for the Christians in our Founding who understood God's word and His attitude toward the free will of man.

2 Corinthians 3:17
Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is present, there is freedom.

Galatians 5:13
For you were called to freedom, brothers and sisters; only do not use your freedom as an opportunity to indulge your flesh, but through love serve one another.

Modern-day Christians may have trouble understanding this, but that's because God's word isn't really being taught in the majority of churches anymore. It's all about emotionalism and good feelings and social life. Christians in the founding era had their share this as well but it wasn't nearly as rampant as it is today.


message 24: by Nate (new)

Nate So the list would be better if it were more narrow with less titles? Isn't the point of becoming informed (on any topic) to read all sides?

Dante - I think the comments are supposed to be about the list, not a christian debate about the old world thinking (which advocated slavery) of what the founding fathers understood.


message 25: by Julien (new)

Julien V Glen Beck. Ayn Rand. The Bible.... No wonder people in the USA can't have a rational discussion about state-sponsored health care.

(And when you type "state-sponsored" in google, you get "state-sponsored terrorism" as first result. It's insane. And that's my point.)


message 26: by Liz (new)

Liz Stephen wrote: "Gabriel wrote: "Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity on this list? God, no.

And Ayn Rand? Really?"

I had very similar thoughts."


As did I.


message 27: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Nate wrote: " may I suggest a book for you? Please read, "The Jefferson Lies..."

I felt like that author is sort of on the fringe debating others on the polar opposite fringe. The lies he breaks down in each..."
Everything in David Barton's book is meticulously researched and contains numerous footnotes from Jefferson's original documents. Historians hate it because it doesn't gel with their opinions on opinions. The original documents and writings can't be disputed. If you actually read it I think you would find it interesting. Don't be duped by the mainstream media.


message 28: by Melissa (new)

Melissa David wrote: "the holy bible and the book of mormon? really??? people, you know America is not a Christian nation, right? There's a little thing called freedom of religion..." You misunderstand the founders. Freedom of religion is a right that was put into the Constitution because the founders didn't want the government to interfere in religion like it had in England with the Church of England. They weren't afraid of religion on the contrary, they wanted it preserved against the interference of the government, not the other way around. The founders were Christians. Read the Federalist Papers and you'll figure that out. Or if that's too hard, I recommend the 5000 year leap. The Constitution was based very much on the Book of Deutoronomy in the Bible. Unfortunately, real history based on the actual documents of the time is not taught anymore.


message 29: by Melissa (new)

Melissa James wrote: "Our country wasn't based on the Bible (maybe The Jefferson Bible); however, a lot of people these days seem to think it was." Read the Federalist Papers. The Book of Deutoronomy in the Bible is the most heavily quoted book by the founders. Our Constitution is very much based on the bible. Read the actual documents instead of spouting what your teachers told you.


message 30: by Nate (new)

Nate Melissa - mainstream media doesn't discuss these topics, so you can't blame them-that is just cliche phrase now used by anyone with a view that dissents from conventional thought.

I like dissenters, but Barton is unimpressive to me. It seems his research was based on proving others wrong, rather than publishing his own results-meaning he had a preselected conclusion and was grabbing at whatever he could, in any context, to prove his case. I would love it if he discovered new evidence or facts or illustrated how conventional wisdom on history is off a little, but he didn't do that from what I saw. His publisher, who is based in Nashville (not exactly ground zero for liberal rhetoric), agreed.

I still am not sure what Barton was trying to prove though, that Jefferson was a flawless Christian?

As for your religion reference, the founding fathers tended to say one thing, and do another-so simply quoting historical documents hardly provides enough context to what was really going on. Everyone is free, unless you're black, everyone is equal, unless you're a woman, everyone has religious freedom, except you have to pay taxes for whatever religious choice your state has made and your religion is frankly not wanted/welcome if it isn't ours.

I have found that the oxford guide to the supreme court does a great job of discussing historical cases, and how the culture and the interpretation of constitution & law was used at the time (it has changed.... A lot).


message 31: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Nate wrote: "Melissa - mainstream media doesn't discuss these topics, so you can't blame them-that is just cliche phrase now used by anyone with a view that dissents from conventional thought.

I like dissent..."
Nate, where to start. So much of our history has been changed and altered because of the Progressive movement in the United States beginning in the late 1800's and really coming into fruition during Woodrow Wilson's Presidency. (Read Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism.) The founders didn't "say one thing and do another," that is misguided. The founders very much believed in the things they wrote and lived by them. For instance, most of them were abolitionists and the 2/3rds clause in the Constitution was meant to wipe out slavery by limiting the amount of influence of the Southern States. It had nothing to do with the worth of the person, only how their vote was counted which would have been influenced by their masters. I'm not saying the founders were perfect, but it is easy for us to cast stones, when we have issues in our Society that people ignore such as strapping our children and our grandchildren with massive debt without a care in the world (by both political parties.)

As for David Barton, I suggest you read his rebuttal to the publisher. Quoting letters, journals, writings all express the thoughts, opinions, and emotions of the person writing. Obviously the historians weren't alive then and so the only way we can judge that time period is through the documents, letters, journals of the time. Everything else is pure speculation. Have you read the book? If you haven't, then how can you judge something you haven't read?

The mainstream media is responsible for misrepresenting, colluding, and hiding truth. They are no longer unbiased trying to present all sides. They are definitely trying to shape opinion rather than report facts. When, for instance, the tea party is discussed, they show a picture of a white old man dressed like George Washington rather than show the African American families with young kids who are attending the rallies. Why? The media isn't trustworthy because they have an agenda. Therefore, whenever they do a hatchet job on someone like David Barton, it behooves us to try to get the facts from both sides.


message 32: by Nate (last edited Sep 17, 2012 03:07PM) (new)

Nate Was there ever a time when media was unbiased and trying to present all sides From my understanding newspapers often took to liking/disliking a candidate or issue and regardless of reality, reported what they wanted in the context that best suited their objectives.

I don't think media has an agenda as much as they need ratings, and a happy sunshine day doesn't get ratings. Racism or anything extreme does. You can blame the media, but really, the viewers I think are the ones to blame because they won't watch/read/click unless it's something extreme.

I didn't read all of Barton's book no, I read the first part, skimmed some of the other chapters randomly, and put it back on the shelf. I can judge it because I don't need to read every word an author scribes to surmise an opinion about his writing, just like I don't need to watch every minute of dinner in the oven to know it's cooking. This book is also not a novel where there are character developments, etc., which might be crucial to the story. Barton's format is almost short story like where he singles in on a topic, discredits it in his own fashion, then moves to the next one. I don't agree with his publisher taking it off the shelf, but I also wouldn't recommend anyone buy it unless you were on one side of the extreme.

If I recall one of his chapters is about how Jefferson is a Christian, something that's not disputed, but he's not fighting a battle not against regular historical fact, but against quacks on the other end. They amplify Jefferson's periods of doubt in faith to make it seem like he had no religious beliefs, where as Barton attempts to nullify it completely as if it was taken out of context-that a strong christian such as Jefferson could never have a moment of doubt in all his infinite wisdom. Mainstream historians (if there is such a thing), to my understanding, take it for it is: a period of doubt, nothing more, nothing less.

If the 2/3 clause was meant to end slavery, and not to keep more representatives of the south in power, then it failed miserably.


message 33: by Dante (new)

Dante Ferrigno Nate wrote: "If the 2/3 clause was meant to end slavery, and not to keep more representatives of the south in power, then it failed miserably. "

This statement totally ignores historical context. Frederick Douglass, a former slave, knew this when he said, “Let me tell you something. Do you know that you have been deceived and cheated? You have been told that this government was intended from the beginning for white men, and for white men exclusively; that the men who formed the Union and framed the Constitution designed the permanent exclusion of the colored people from the benefits of those institutions. Davis, Taney and Yancey, traitors at the south, have propagated this statement, while their copperhead echoes at the north have repeated the same. There never was a bolder or more wicked perversion of the truth of history. So far from this purpose was the mind and heart of your fathers, that they desired and expected the abolition of slavery. They framed the Constitution plainly with a view to the speedy downfall of slavery. They carefully excluded from the Constitution any and every word which could lead to the belief that they meant it for persons of only one complexion.

The Constitution, in its language and in its spirit, welcomes the black man to all the rights which it was intended to guarantee to any class of the American people. Its preamble tells us for whom and for what it was made.”

Frederick Douglass (June 1863)


message 34: by Nate (last edited Sep 19, 2012 11:33AM) (new)

Nate I love that you picked Frederick Douglass, since it helps communicate what I was trying to say (although since he wasn't even alive when the founding documents were written, I'm not sure how he provides the historical context that I apparently am missing). He's pointing out the hypocrisy of what was written vs. what was actually practiced-a hypocrisy that was practiced by the very authors of the documents he's referencing.

This is not about the list anymore though, and I'd rather not turn off future viewers who aren't looking for a historical debate about slavery.

You think Barton's book is worthy of the reading time, I think there are better options, either way it's on the list and I think anyone who picks it up can make their own call after reading the first chapter or two.


message 35: by Charles (new)

Charles Stephen wrote: "Gabriel wrote: "Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity on this list? God, no.

And Ayn Rand? Really?"

I had very similar thoughts."


I saw Howard Zinn, Paul Krugman on the list. One who is a devote socialist with nothing positive to say about the US. The other is a phony economist, clinging to his ideology. I agree that Beck and Hannity should not be on this list.


message 36: by Becky (new)

Becky Dont you think that those type of people need to be on the list? As, in, an example of everything thats wrong with the voters being sucked in by a constant hyperbolic attack from the media?

And Ayn Rand is tossed around so much by misunderstanding Conservatives, and Machiavelli is a book every president has read. You dont have to agree with it, but its important to see where some of these people are getting their ideas....


message 37: by Nate (new)

Nate You dont have to agree with it, but its important to see where some of these people are getting their ideas....

Well said Becky, I couldn't agree more. It's a catch-22 with political books since if you don't expose yourself to the other side you will have no way of being well-rounded, but if you do expose yourself to the other side, then people think you're nuts for spending any amount of time on it.

I spend more time reading the stuff I disagree with so I can try to understand their views more, but it seems many people prefer to read only the stances that fit their viewpoints, and their only exposure to the opposition is from the people they agree with who are only selecting bits of information to support their cause.


message 38: by Becky (new)

Becky I'm solidly in the middle if you balance my views against each other, so I find myself exasperated on all fronts :)


message 39: by Charles (new)

Charles Ayn Rand actually isn't conservative, she is an atheist and pro-choice and wasn't fond of Reagan. Her economic and views on small government is what makes her favorable to conservatives.


message 40: by Nate (new)

Nate I just finished White House Burning and felt it was a great book about the history of national debt and budgets, how they've functioned historically, and how they are used today.


message 41: by Gabriel (new)

Gabriel Cooper Chamko wrote: "Where is the "Shock Doctrine" by Naomi Klein and "The Wrecking Crew" by Thomas Frank and many others? This is a very very limited list."
Then add some.


message 42: by Doris-Maria (new)

Doris-Maria Travis wrote: "Yeah, a lot of these would have the opposite effect of informing a voter. Instead of informing people of the truth and the issues, many of these just inform the reader of one partisan groups incred..."

Good point, as this list seems a bit to the right - however, if you are able to take the time and read them A L L then you will get a variety... Maybe better than watch TV channels.


message 43: by Nate (new)

Nate If I'm understanding some of these comments correctly, the ethos seems to be that the best path to become an informed voter is to only read the books that you agree with; but to me, that would result in the opposite effect of becoming a well-rounded (informed) voter.

Even if you feel the other side is filled with false/skewed information, it seems that you would still greatly benefit to understand where they're coming from so that you could potentially share your views/facts in a kinder light, rather than just bulldozing your own ideology over them.

I also think it'd be fair to say that many of these authors-on both sides-may have book sales, rather than education, at the vanguard of their thoughts when authoring a title.

The true scope of becoming an informed voter would span thousands of books, but deciding what type of government you want is probably the first step to getting there.


message 44: by ☆Dani☆ (new)

☆Dani☆ I agree with Max, this isn't relevant to non-Americans, should be renamed to specify.


message 45: by Katie (new)

Katie Travis wrote: "Yeah, a lot of these would have the opposite effect of informing a voter. Instead of informing people of the truth and the issues, many of these just inform the reader of one partisan groups incred..."

Isn't that part of being an informed citizen, though? Knowing where the other side is coming from? If some political parties reference "Atlas Shrugged" or "Animal Farm" as a guide to their beliefs, I think it's worth looking into if you haven't before. I don't think any books should be banned or looked down upon no matter the content. Maybe just...not aligned with what you think :)


message 46: by Katie (new)

Katie Nate wrote: "If I'm understanding some of these comments correctly, the ethos seems to be that the best path to become an informed voter is to only read the books that you agree with; but to me, that would resu..."

I completely agree. I was born a Rupublican-no-gay-marriage-coorporations-are-amazing-Christianity-for-everyone and fully believed all of it. But growing up and exposing myself to the other sides I realize the truth in what my family had to say (though, it's becoming less and less) but now I identify more as a liberal.


message 47: by Joel (new)

Joel Gabriel wrote: "Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity on this list? God, no.

And Ayn Rand? Really?"


Howard Zinn? Barack Obama? Noam Chomsky? Really? God no!

See what I did there?


message 48: by Laurentk (new)

Laurentk deleted user wrote: "The lack of philosophical works on this list makes it beyond deplorable. It's mostly just a collection of partisan pamphlets that serve only to keep citizens short-sighted, bigoted, and unworthy to..."

I'm quite sure The bell curve is horrendous racism posing as science. Glad to see you've deleted your account.


message 49: by John (new)

John Bohnert None of these books will assist a voter. Instead you should read your local newspaper, watch local TV news, watch international news (BBC World News),watch national news,and MSNBC if you're a Democrat.


message 50: by Joel (new)

Joel Laurentk wrote: "I'm quite sure The bell curve is horrendous racism posing as science. Glad to see you've deleted your account. "

argumentum ad consequentiam


« previous 1
back to top