Nanosh

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Slavery and Polit...
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Saber perder
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Nanosh is now friends with Annie Tyner
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Slavery and Politics by Rafael Marquese
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The Haves and the Have-Nots by Branko Milanović
“The contrast between an apparent concern about poverty and lack of concern about inequality was nicely summarized recently by English historian David Kynaston: “Everyone is happy talking about eliminating poverty, because this looks like an admirable and ethical response to the problem of inequality, while leaving the structures of power untouched.”
Branko Milanović
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That is, pay attention to claims of essential difference and you can derive social relations of coercion/hierarchies of power.
“Whether focused on ancestry, visible race, or combinations of the two, systems of ranked difference aimed to separate people into hierarchies of inequality while incorporating them in colonial production, justifying exploitations with claims of essential difference.”
John Tutino
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Saber perder by David Trueba
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Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire
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The Relentless Revolution by Joyce Appleby
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España invertebrada by José Ortega y Gasset
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Vida y aventuras del más célebre bandido sonorense, Joaquín M... by Ireneo Paz
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Surprise in the Kitchen by Mary    Lee
Surprise in the Kitchen
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Greg Grandin
“Another visitor described them as “midget hells, where one lies awake and sweats the first half of the night, and frequently between midnight and dawn undergoes a fierce siege of heat-provoking nightmares.” They seemed to be “designed by Detroit architects who probably couldn’t envision a land without snow.”19 Ford managers, said the priest, “never really figured out what country they were in.”
Greg Grandin, Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

“The second part of the folk theory holds that racism is entirely a matter of individual beliefs, intentions, and actions. In the folk theory, a racist is a person who believes that people of color are biologically inferior to Whites, so that White privilege is deserved and must be defended. Racism is what this kind of White supremacist thinks and does. The folk theory holds that such people are anachronisms, who are ignorant, vicious, and remote from the mainstream. Their ignorance can be cured by education. Their viciousness can be addressed by helping them to enjoy new advantages, so that they can gain self-esteem and will not have to look down on others. Since education and general well-being are increasing, racism should soon disappear entirely, except as a sign of mental derangement or disability.
One of the most difficult exercises that this book recommends is to move away from thinking of racism as entirely a matter of individual beliefs and psychological states. White Americans generally agree that things happen in the world because individuals, with beliefs, emotions, and intentions, cause them to happen. They consider this understanding to be the most obvious kind of common sense. Yet not everyone approaches the world from this perspective, and it is very interesting to try to think about racism from outside the framework that it imposes. Critical theorists do not deny that individual beliefs figure in racism. But we prefer to emphasize its collective, cultural dimensions, and to avoid singling out individuals and trying to decide whether they are racists or not. Furthermore, critical theorists insist that ordinary people who do not share White supremacist beliefs can still talk and behave in ways that advance the projects of White racism. I will try to show, in chapters to come, how”
Jane H. Hill, The Everyday Language of White Racism

Greg Grandin
“after centuries of observation scientists are still not exactly sure why the Amazon—unlike other forests, where leaves turn brown during the dry season—grows green and lush when the rain stops or how this reversed pattern of photosynthesis contributes to the broader seasonal distribution of water throughout the region.”
Greg Grandin, Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

Greg Grandin
“preserving the essence, in fact the breath—when it opened, his museum displayed Thomas Edison’s last exhalation, captured by his son in a test tube at Ford’s request—of a more durable American experience.”
Greg Grandin, Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

Greg Grandin
“But the most profound irony is currently on display at the very site of Ford’s most ambitious attempt to realize his pastoralist vision. In the Tapajós valley, three prominent elements of Ford’s vision—lumber, which he hoped to profit from while at the same time finding ways to conserve nature; roads, which he believed would knit small towns together and create sustainable markets; and soybeans, in which he invested millions, hoping that the industrial crop would revive rural life—have become the primary agents of the Amazon’s ruin, not just of its flora and fauna but of many of its communities.”
Greg Grandin, Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

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