Violeta

Add friend
Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Violeta.

https://www.goodreads.com/violeta724

Violeta’s Recent Updates

Violeta rated a book it was amazing
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
Rate this book
Clear rating
4.5 stars. I don’t read mystery/thriller/horror usually, but I put this on my to-read shelf at the recommendations of some friends. This was a definite page-turner, the psychological eeriness creating its own momentum. It would have been unbearable ...more
Violeta rated a book liked it
The Great Pretender by Susannah Cahalan
Rate this book
Clear rating
Disheartening but well-researched look at what turned out to be one of the biggest cons in the field of psychology/psychiatry- the 1973 Rosenhan experiment. Callahan details the way Rosenhan’s “work” influenced psychiatric protocols, public policy, ...more
Violeta wants to read
Our Rainbow Queen by Sali Hughes
Rate this book
Clear rating
Violeta wants to read
My Glory Was I Had Such Friends by Amy Silverstein
Rate this book
Clear rating
Violeta wants to read
The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson
Rate this book
Clear rating
Violeta wants to read
Woven in Moonlight by Isabel Ibañez
Woven in Moonlight
by Isabel Ibañez (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Violeta started reading
The Great Pretender by Susannah Cahalan
Rate this book
Clear rating
Violeta wants to read
Meg and Jo by Virginia Kantra
Meg and Jo
by Virginia Kantra (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Violeta wants to read
This Must Be the Place by Maggie O'Farrell
Rate this book
Clear rating
I Am, I Am, I Am by Maggie O'Farrell
"I loved this. I’m a big fan of medical memoirs anyway, and this is like 17 different medical memoirs in one. Some read like thrillers, my heart racing, some unfold more mysteriously. The prose is gorgeous. The themes (motherhood, freedom, medicine..." Read more of this review »
More of Violeta's books…
Mary Oliver
“YEARS AGO I set three "rules" for myself. Every poem I write, I said, must have a genuine body, it must have sincere energy, and it must have a spiritual purpose. If a poem to my mind failed any one of these categories it was rebuked and redone, or discarded. Over the forty or so years during which writing poems has been my primary activity, I have added other admonitions and consents. I want every poem to "rest" in intensity. I want it to be rich with "pictures of the world." I want it to carry threads from the perceptually felt world to the intellectual world. I want each poem to indicate a life lived with intelligence, patience, passion, and whimsy (not my life—not necessarily!—but the life of my formal self, the writer). I want the poem to ask something and, at its best moments, I want the question to remain unanswered. I want it to be clear that answering the question is the reader's part in an implicit author-reader pact. Last but not least, I want the poem to have a pulse, a breathiness, some moment of earthly delight. (While one is luring the reader into the enclosure of serious subjects, pleasure is by no means an unimportant ingredient.)”
Mary Oliver, Winter Hours