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8 unexpected downsides of the switch to ebooks

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message 2: by Aethelberga (new)

Aethelberga | 35 comments I have found that one real downside to ebooks, is that I now read like I'm a chain smoker. It used to be that I would buy a few books at the bookstore, burn through them and then have to rely on my bookshelves for entertainment until I got to the bookstore again. With my Kindle, I just fire up the WiFi and buy the next one. I just keep reading and get nothing else done.


message 3: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments I agree - its especially been addictive since I stumbled across the indie/self published crowd on Amazon and can get a lot of good books for just $.99 to $2.99


message 4: by Tacuazin (new)

Tacuazin | 22 comments Aethelberga wrote: "I have found that one real downside to ebooks, is that I now read like I'm a chain smoker..."
I thought I was the only one compulsively chain-reading since I got my ebook reader! I also blame GoodReads, though. Suddenly there are so many books out there, more than in my local library!


message 5: by Kate (new)

Kate O'Hanlon (kateohanlon) | 778 comments drm?


message 6: by Brad Theado (new)

Brad Theado | 217 comments Goodreads has definitely increased my reading. I would have not heard of half of what I have read in the last two years without it. Ive read 100% ebooks for 5 years now so the ebook reader hasnt had that impact on me.


message 7: by Micah (new)

Micah (onemorebaker) | 1071 comments Kate wrote: "drm?"

is stupid and pointless. It is only a matter of time before the publishers realize this just like the record labels have. Anybody that puts their mind to it can get it without trouble for free. I believe books are where music was in 2005. Give it 2-3 years and DRM should be gone.


message 8: by Kris (new)

Kris (kvolk) lending is much harder is my only complaint so far


message 9: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments I really don't care any more about the old DRM debate because it does not interfer with me reading what ever I have purchased where ever I want.

I mostly use the kindle app on my iPad to read ebooks. I can read them on my net book, lap top, desk top, iPad, iPhone, and even a kindle device if I decided to purchase one in the future.


message 10: by Aethelberga (new)

Aethelberga | 35 comments Stan wrote: "I agree - its especially been addictive since I stumbled across the indie/self published crowd on Amazon and can get a lot of good books for just $.99 to $2.99"

Yes, this. No need to justify a purchase at such a low price point means more impulse downloads.


message 11: by Craig (new)

Craig | 53 comments I often fall asleep while reading in bed. I find that my iPad hurts more when I drop it on my nose than the old fashioned book used to.


message 12: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome | 6350 comments These are the actual items from the link:

8. You Can't Hide a Gun in a Kindle
7. You Need Physical Books for Physical Tasks
6. No More Flipbooks and Mustaches in Textbooks
5. It May Change the Perception of the Necronomicon and Other Mystical Books
4. Book Burnings Will Have Less Visual Impact
3. How Will People Open Secret Passageways?
2. You Can't Separate Bathroom Books from Outside Books
1. People Will Really Have to Think Before Handing Out Fliers and Religious Pamphlets


message 13: by Charles (new)

Charles Cadenhead (thatcharliedude) | 190 comments I miss the smell of cheap paper. Lol


message 14: by Nick (new)

Nick (whyzen) | 1295 comments Charles wrote: "I miss the smell of cheap paper. Lol"

You like huffing the chemical smell given off by cheap paper? :-)


message 15: by Charles (new)

Charles Cadenhead (thatcharliedude) | 190 comments Nick wrote: "Charles wrote: "I miss the smell of cheap paper. Lol"

You like huffing the chemical smell given off by cheap paper? :-)"


Most definitely. lol ;)


message 16: by Tina (new)

Tina (javabird) | 710 comments Stan wrote: "I really don't care any more about the old DRM debate because it does not interfer with me reading what ever I have purchased where ever I want.

I mostly use the kindle app on my iPad to read eboo..."


I have the iBooks, Kindle and Nook apps on my iPad (not to mention Stanza, Bluefire and Overdrive). The only way I can keep track of where everything is is by using the BookCrawler app on my iPad.


message 17: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (gord_johansen) | 3 comments Being a Luddite where e-readers are concerned, I find it easier to keep track of books as I have them sorted by author on my bookshelves downstairs.


message 18: by Chris (new)

Chris Haynes | 18 comments The chain-smoker analogy is very appropriate. Buying and downloading books to my nook is almost too easy. It's like I'm not really buying anything; I just click a link and there it is.

The other "bad" thing was when I discovered audible.com (thanks to Sword & Laser, TWIT, TRS and countless others). I have an hour commute everyday so I listen to the audio book version of the e-books I read so I burn through books very fast!! It's like crack!!

BTW, authors should show me the love for buying two copies of their books by giving me some free books!!!


message 19: by Napoez3 (new)

Napoez3 | 158 comments Aethelberga wrote: "I have found that one real downside to ebooks, is that I now read like I'm a chain smoker. It used to be that I would buy a few books at the bookstore, burn through them and then have to rely on my..."

Kindle and goodreads: the worst combination ever! I finish a book, I start another one in a few minutes.

Now I know what people with addiction problems feel.


message 20: by AndrewP (new)

AndrewP (andrewca) | 2501 comments Tina wrote: "I have the iBooks, Kindle and Nook apps on my iPad (not to mention Stanza, Bluefire and Overdrive). The only way I can keep track of where everything is is by using the BookCrawler app on my iPad. "

That seems to be a failing of all the eReaders and apps. They all absolutely suck at organizing your books into categories, folders etc etc.


message 21: by David (new)

David Carroll (david_carroll) | 7 comments There seems to be one aspect of eBooks which I don't see discussed here. The slush pile. It doesn't take much time, and no money, to e-publish a book once it's been written. How do you choose good novels out of the slew of new authors?

David


message 22: by Warren (new)

Warren | 1556 comments True. Without the agents and editors acting as gate keepers a lot gets out that making finding the good stuff more difficult.
"I'm all for the common man but who are all these dreadful people?"
:-} I'm guilty of looking at the hardback then buying the ebook. Which is killing the book stores. I love my kindle but still love hard copy books as well. I'm not sure what the solution is.


message 23: by Keith (new)

Keith (keithatc) I've found that at home, I buy many more books but read less with the eReader. Don't know why. Most of my reading happens on the train to and from work, and it's just easier to pull out a book-book, especially late in the PM (or very very early in the AM, if it's been a fun night). Someone is much less likely to steal my copy of Fool Moon than they are my iPad

However, while traveling, I love the eReader. I can't sleep on planes, no matter how tired I am and no matter how long the flight, so I can plow through books pretty quickly at the airport/on a flight. It's a lot easier to carry a stack of books on an eReader than it is to cram them into my carry-on.


message 24: by Aethelberga (new)

Aethelberga | 35 comments David wrote: "There seems to be one aspect of eBooks which I don't see discussed here. The slush pile. It doesn't take much time, and no money, to e-publish a book once it's been written. How do you choose good ..."

I've been going by the rating system on the Kindle. Most of them are spot on. I've come across a couple of turkeys, but honestly they're no worse than some of the worst 'traditionally-published' books I have read.


message 25: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 1081 comments One big downside for me is for others to know what one is reading. Another is not really have to carry around one book at a time, so if one does not want to read a book, one can change.


message 26: by Rob (new)

Rob Osterman (robosterman) One big downside for me is for others to know what one is reading. Another is not really have to carry around one book at a time, so if one does not want to read a book, one can change.

Is this a downside to eBooks or an upside?

I've heard that part of the reason for the sales spike in Bodice Rippers is that anyone with a Kindle can quietly enjoy on the train and no one knows she's got her nose buried in "The Prince's Quarters".

Figuratively speaking that is....


message 27: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments Aethelberga wrote: "I've been going by the rating system on the Kindle. Most of them are spot on. I've come across a couple of turkeys, but honestly they're no worse than some of the worst 'traditionally-published' books I have read. ..."

Bingo - exactly what I do. It has turned the self published books into a valuable resource for quality books for a price between $0.99 - $2.99


message 28: by Tina (new)

Tina (javabird) | 710 comments Chris wrote: "The chain-smoker analogy is very appropriate. Buying and downloading books to my nook is almost too easy. It's like I'm not really buying anything; I just click a link and there it is.

The other "..."


Agreed. I've spent much more money on ebooks than I ever spent on DTB's. I used to get nearly all my books from the library, because DTB's were just too expensive. Now it's just too easy to buy ebooks.


message 29: by Tina (new)

Tina (javabird) | 710 comments Charles wrote: "I miss the smell of cheap paper. Lol"

There was a Buffy episode where I think Giles is lamenting the use of computers over books, and he comments "that's what's wrong, they don't have any smell." I loved that.


message 30: by Pickle (new)

Pickle | 192 comments if i switch to an ebook/kindle then i will never buy another book again as i can download them. Same happened with CD's then DVD's and i havent went to the cinema since LOTR: The Two Towers.

I only see myself switching to a kindle when shops stop selling paperbacks, which will hopefully never happen.


message 31: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 1081 comments Adrienne wrote: "Kevin wrote: "One big downside for me is for others to know what one is reading."

I'm one of those people who surreptitiously try to figure out what other people on my bus are reading. Darn kindle..."


I agree, I try to do the same. For example I was on the train yesterday, and I saw someone reading Raymond E. Feist's Silverthorn, that could not have happened if the person was reading it on an e reader of some kind.


message 32: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome | 6350 comments Ereaders should display the cover on the back.


message 33: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4188 comments There is something to be said for being seen reading a massive tome such as War and Peace or maybe in this day and age, Infinite Jest.


message 34: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 1081 comments terpkristin wrote: "There is something to be said for being seen reading a massive tome such as War and Peace or maybe in this day and age, Infinite Jest."

I love been seen reading big books. More people notice you. The bigger the book the better.


message 35: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome | 6350 comments I've had the pleasure of being seen reading The Neutronium Alchemist.


message 36: by Eric (new)

Eric Taylor | 20 comments Stan wrote: "I really don't care any more about the old DRM debate because it does not interfer with me reading what ever I have purchased where ever I want.

I mostly use the kindle app on my iPad to read eboo..."


Do you ever have trouble reading them on your ipad?


message 37: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments Nope - I use the kindle and the nook apps on my iPad. I can even buy books straight from BAEN and use the kindle app to read them.


message 38: by Warren (new)

Warren | 1556 comments Microsoft revealed that it’s preparing to close the book on its Reader application designed to support e-books in the .lit file format.
http://goo.gl/5J541

They close shop in August.
I love ebooks but paper books don't become obsolete.


message 39: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments Tell that to my 1970 paper backs which are now a yellowed, crumbling mass of torn and missing pages


message 40: by roosterSause (new)

roosterSause | 15 comments Tamahome wrote: "I've had the pleasure of being seen reading The Neutronium Alchemist."

I got some great reactions when reading
The Naked God. ;)


message 41: by Warren (last edited Feb 25, 2012 07:19AM) (new)

Warren | 1556 comments Since I read in both formats I hope they both survive.
My only criteria is that it fit in my jacket pocket.
The NY Times had an article about the decline in paperback sales:
http://goo.gl/L2Dgu
What they don't mention is that when new paperbacks cost $7.99 people are more inclined to shop for used one. Which throws off the sales numbers.


message 42: by Derrick (new)

Derrick (noetichatter) Warren wrote: "What they don't mention is that when new paperbacks cost $7.99 people are more inclined to shop for used one. Which throws off the sales numbers. "

And don't forget those weird TPB-high mass markets that are now being used to allow a book to be $9.99. I ordered a copy of Starship Troopers awhile back from amazon, thinking it would be the lovely little mass market that I had checked out so many times from my library. No, it was that weird tall version.

So I checked it out from library and then told them I "lost" it. They said I could pay or else give them a brand new one. Well, I just happened to have a brand new one on hand. . .


message 43: by Procrastinador (new)

Procrastinador Diletante | 104 comments Also, you won't be able to lend books to friends or donate them to a library or a school, once you're finished and aren't keen on keeping them.

André


message 44: by Natalia's Daddy (new)

Natalia's Daddy (nataliasdaddy) | 8 comments Huge downside is that my trips to the bookstore are rare. Only go to take my 2 year old daughter so she can wonder around the shelves and become used to books.

Also the ease of buying books, one can easily get in trouble spending too much on your couch.

I want to also point out why the ebooks are same price as printed. If the author gets more percentage I can live with it. If not why then?


message 45: by Ewan (new)

Ewan (ewanreads) | 94 comments As other people have mentioned, the only downside to ebooks I have seen is my wildly compulsive behaviour when it comes to consuming novel after novel.
I'll finish the pick and my personal reading and then scan the "what else are you reading" thread and immediately download at least 10 other books and read and read and read until the next pick comes out.

This is probably not helped by the fact that I read ebooks on a tablet and my phone and so it's even easier and less obtrusive or anti-social for my to read wherever I am.


message 46: by AndrewP (new)

AndrewP (andrewca) | 2501 comments Alex wrote: "Nobody's mentioned the environmental impacts, though I can't say one way or another whether how damaging the impact of print books are.
..."


Probably because the environmental impact of a dead tree book is insignificant compared to all the heavy metals required for an eReader, particularly the battery.


message 47: by Paul (new)

Paul Vincent (astronomicon) AndrewP wrote: "Alex wrote: "Nobody's mentioned the environmental impacts, though I can't say one way or another whether how damaging the impact of print books are.
..."

Probably because the environmental impact..."


I think you have to take into account that the average ereader user might read hundreds or possibly thousands of books during the life of the ereader device. It's not a simple 1:1 comparison.


message 48: by Paul (new)

Paul Vincent (astronomicon) The only thing I miss about paper books is the smell (as I think someone mentioned before in this thread) but that's a pretty minor thing.

I've certainly read a lot more books since I got my Kindle, and the free books on Amazon have introduced me to some interesting sci-fi authors I didn't know previously.


message 49: by Israel (new)

Israel | 80 comments Warren wrote: "Since I read in both formats I hope they both survive.
My only criteria is that it fit in my jacket pocket.
The NY Times had an article about the decline in paperback sales:
http://goo.gl/L2Dgu
Wha..."


Don't worry, Calbre can convert the old .lit books to .epub or almost anything else you need.


message 50: by Keith (new)

Keith (keithatc) Part way though my morning commute read today, I realized that I will end up buying the regular book version, eventually, of most everything I've bought in ebook form. What I really want is a "Buy the physical book, get the ebook for free" option. Or if not free, how about really cheap?


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