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Mystery (Non-Scandinavian) > Where do you get your books?

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message 1: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments I'm curious about something. Where do you get your books? I'm in Finland and out of the loop on this. Personally, I frequent used book stores and download from amazon on occasion. I'm a reviewer an get a lot of ARCs. They keep me busy. But for instance, full hardcover price for one of my own hardcover books here is usually 33€ or almost 50 bucks. A LOT of money in MHO. Libraries are important here. Just the Helsinki system usually buys around 100 of mine and the wait is still long. Most of you read so voraciously that you could easily spend your life savings on books. How are you feeding your reading needs?


message 2: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments James wrote: "I'm curious about something. Where do you get your books? I'm in Finland and out of the loop on this. Personally, I frequent used book stores and download from amazon on occasion. I'm a reviewer an..."

BTW, I have a terrible problem with pirated books. I've collected about 50 URLs from pirate sites since Lucifer's Tears came out. I forward them to my publisher and their legal department has cease and desist orders issued, which, I notice are largely ignored. I know books are expensive, but I wish people would thing about, before they download and steal a pirated book, that authors must pay rent and eat too.


message 3: by Fizzycola (new)

Fizzycola | 163 comments I only buy books I have already read and want to OWN, and then it's always a hard-cover. Once in a while I do buy a paper-back just to read the book, but the library is my normal channel. Both of your books were available in my local library. Well, I had to wait for Lucifer's Tears for a while but then they bought a few more copies so no problem there.

It works well if you don't expect to read every best seller a few weeks after it's been published. I'm not that impatient.

Also, I only read paper books. Ebooks just don't feel like... well, BOOKS. But with more and more people reading ebooks I guess piracy is a problem that just can't be controlled. Like it has been with music for years.


message 4: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments I think if books were more modestly priced, there would be a lot less theft. Like software. Inflation and unemployment are high, wages are stagnant. A lot of people can't afford their entertainment--which in bad times they need more than ever--and will steal before they'll stop reading, listening to music, and using their computers. I'm sympathetic to that.


message 5: by Marie (new)

Marie (marieelia) | 19 comments Almost all of my reading is done through my library. (Granted I live in a city with a great public library system.) I limit my book purchasing to poetry, small press editions, reference, and/or something I'll want to keep going back to -- or something I've checked out of the library more than twice.


message 6: by Art (new)

Art | 48 comments 99 percent of my reading is through the library.I think I have bought one new book in the last 6 months and that was a small print book I really had to have. I just can't afford them these days, even paperbacks. I do try to support the authors I like by spreading the word about them and pestering the library to buy the authors books they don't have already through the "Suggest a book" link on their website. I don't pretend it helps the authors as much as buying books, but it's what I can do.


message 7: by Ken, Moderator (U.S.A.) (new)

Ken Fredette (klfredette) | 4413 comments Mod
I never buy a book for face value, I usually buy them 2nd hand from Amazon. My house is a book store. My wife grumbles about this.


message 8: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments Art wrote: "99 percent of my reading is through the library.I think I have bought one new book in the last 6 months and that was a small print book I really had to have. I just can't afford them these days, ev..."

Everything helps, and that's why libraries exist! Hence my question. New books cost a hell of a lot of money.


message 9: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments Kenneth wrote: "I never buy a book for face value, I usually buy them 2nd hand from Amazon. My house is a book store. My wife grumbles about this."

I tried the second hand books, but with international shipping rates, it's often cheaper to just download them for me.


message 10: by Junying (new)

Junying | 267 comments I buy a great majority of my books from Amazon, ever since I started using it about 12 years ago, initially paperbacks and occasionally hardbacks, and more recently kindle books. I do also buy from bookshops in the UK and when travelling overseas, like Waterstones and Borders (before they shut down). Since my neighbourhood has about 4 charity shops, which is within walking distance for me, I also buy some second-hand ones and give them the ones my husband has read and no longer wanted.

Kindle has been great for me because there isn't much room for my paperbacks in the house and the risk of some of my best loved books being given away is hard to bear :) Also I feel that I could actually support some other fellow indie authors by downloading their books onto my kindle, then even if I don't like them, it's at least not a waste of space :)

For the future, I can see my Kindle collection increase at a much higher rate than 'proper' paper books. I am an environmentally friendly person and would like to do my bit if possible :)


message 11: by Maggie (new)

Maggie | 100 comments I don't get out as much as I'd like as I'm disabled so I buy 99.9 per cent of my books from Amazon - probably 75 per cent are second hand. Trouble is - this book buying is getting out of hand!!


message 12: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth (elizabeth8921) | 236 comments I buy my books at a small indie bookstore, Amazon, 2 used book stores and also use two different library systems.
Ken, my hubby grumbles too as our home is a bookstore.

I also sell a small amount of books on line on Amazon used


message 13: by Anna (new)

Anna (aetm) | 228 comments Most of my books I get second hand from my library's book store (it's huge and cheap). Often books arrive less than a year after they first came out there, so if there's something that I fancy I go nuts and don't usually even try to resist the temptation.
I think I've got only 3 books new this year (two of which arrived yesterday - Steve Jobs biography and a Ferran Adria cookbook to make it over $ 25 and to get free shipping for them).
The rest come from bookcrossing (passing books to friends and/or people with similar taste, so I give something and they give something). Or just loan a book from a friend and back.
I used to use the libraries a lot while I lived in Finland, but I gave up that since. In most other places the whole library system is a bit weird or set up way too complicated, or e.g. in Ireland you *pay* to use the library - which I don't think was the original idea of the libraries. Here I know the library is well organized and it's got ton of stuff, but I'm currently enjoying reading stuff at my own pace. So no late fees any more :) my husband used to use the libraries too, but he gave up because he's bad returning stuff in time. So I figured I'll get a library card here at some point but no hurry.
I get the free books at Amazon if they are something that interest me, but I rarely read ebooks. Those that I do I read on my iPad, but with ebooks my concentration skills are really too short. One of the reasons I got back to reading some years ago way more is because I had to use Windows at work and that reduced my attention span to that of a 2 months old kitten. I found picking an analog Ludlum does magic to fix that, action from page 1 to page 720.
Plus I try to get some ARCs, I don't mind reviewing them as long as they are something I enjoy. :)


message 14: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments Buying a book, given their price, is an indulgence I allow myself once in a while, sort of a special treat. I'm talking about books I read purely for pleasure. Some books I need for research and are out of print or hard to find, and I have to seek them out and buy them. Plus, sometimes I know I'm going to write in them, dogear them, and I buy those too. I get the vast majority for free to review or blurb, and I only accept the ones that interest me, so it's a good deal. While I love the book as artifact, my house is so full that it makes me appreciate the e-book, especially if it's something I'm not sure I want to keep. I took two big suitcases of hardbacks by popular authors in pristine condition to a used book book store, to make some room in the house. Cost thousands retail. I know the owner well. He says they don't sell, most people want specialty/academic/especially philosophy books from him. I just left them there and told him to give whatever he wants when/if he sells them. He basically just gives me the books I want anyway, charges me maybe a buck, and keeps an eye out for books he knows I'll want, so I was ok with it, just surprised that people will pay $50 for them in a full retail bookstore, but not interested when they cost a fraction of the price used.


message 15: by Joan (new)

Joan Tanyà (marcuse) | 5 comments I have got used to ereaders so I usually buy ebooks from Amazon, they are usually cheaper than imported books ( I live in Spain) and it also solves the problem of space.


message 16: by Fiona (new)

Fiona | 85 comments I'm currently on holiday in the US and am always astonished at the price of books - so expensive. I would be bankrupt if I lived here.

Either buy my books online or via our local bookstore where you can usually always get good deals plus with their loyalty card can usually get a 'free' one every so often


message 17: by Melinda (new)

Melinda | 3 comments I kindle- and use my public library (easy to search online and place holds).


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

Fiona wrote: "I'm currently on holiday in the US and am always astonished at the price of books - so expensive. I would be bankrupt if I lived here.
"


LOL...if you think American books are expensive you'd better not come to Australia...ours are the most expensive in the English speaking world by quite some distance - new releases are $32.99 in our dollar which is $33.71US and 21.22 GBP - this is for a trade paperback (or softcover) - we don't have a lot of books released in hardback but when we do they're around $45-$50 ($45.98-$51.09US or 28.95-32.16GBP).


message 19: by Anna (new)

Anna (aetm) | 228 comments Fiona, look around for a good second-hand bookstore. If you don't find one where you're staying, check a local Goodwill or Salvation Army (you never know what you find in the bookshelf).
When you find a good place, you should be able to get interesting books for $ 3 or less. (I think someone who reads and likes specific types of fiction don't need to limit themselves to new books - get some second hand for cheaper and you can read way more for the same money)


message 20: by Ian (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 352 comments 100% Amazon kindle. As with Anna, my disability limits my mobility and hence bookshop browsing had become a chore rather than a delight. I now buy and read many more books than ever before and talking to others who have moved to kindle, they say the same, as the purchase process is just so easy and the gratification of book arrival/browsing is instant. Never thought I'd say this, but I prefer my kindle to the paper book experience.


message 21: by Manugw (new)

Manugw | 12 comments Question is what is the difference about downloading a book for free on the internet and borrowing from a Library ?, in both cases there is not purchase, and tantamount to copyright infrigement


James wrote: "James wrote: "I'm curious about something. Where do you get your books? I'm in Finland and out of the loop on this. Personally, I frequent used book stores and download from amazon on occasion. I'm..."


message 22: by Bee (new)

Bee (morgaine620) Nowadays I borrow 99% of my books from the library. I bought exactly 1 Book in 2011 from Amazon as my birthday present but I am not really happy to support such a big company. Mind you I said once I would rather read proper books instead using a kindle but as there are more and more books that I want to read just available as kindle versions I had to change my mind. Got the Android reader for free but for now I just download the Amazon free classics. So my wish to get away from Amazon does not work really. If I am in a Charity shop or close to a Second hand book store I might indulge myself but that hardly ever happens. I am close to two really good libraries so I will stay a good customer to those.


message 23: by Manugw (last edited Dec 20, 2011 12:48PM) (new)

Manugw | 12 comments The Bee wrote: "Nowadays I borrow 99% of my books from the library. I bought exactly 1 Book in 2011 from Amazon as my birthday present but I am not really happy to support such a big company. Mind you I said once ..."
e I would rather read proper books instead using a kindle

It does not matter the source print or electronic but the content

Kindle is great !!!, no more print books collecting dust at home.


message 24: by Bee (last edited Dec 20, 2011 12:54PM) (new)

Bee (morgaine620) :-) well I guess that is a question of taste. As it happens I love libraries and all the dust ect. Even though there are people who talk about all those trees that do not have to be cut down if you get a kindle book instead of a hardcover. And that does make me think a lot as I love trees as well. But as I said at first: This is a question of taste and very subjective. And yes I agree the content is the important thing in the end :-)

Manugw wrote: It does not matter the source print or electronic but the content

Kindle is great !!!, no more print books collecting dust at home.



message 25: by Bee (new)

Bee (morgaine620) Does it make a difference in income to you as an author if you sell a hardcover or an e-book?

James wrote: "James wrote: "I'm curious about something. Where do you get your books? I'm in Finland and out of the loop on this. Personally, I frequent used book stores and download from amazon on occasion. I'm..."


message 26: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments It makes a difference, but I don't know how much. To be honest, I've never calculated it and really have never even thought about it.


message 27: by Bee (new)

Bee (morgaine620) I just wondered as loads of people tell the end of books through e-books but it seems to me that it is more a problem of shops and maybe less a problem of the authors themselves. But I can not see why someone who wrote the content should get less for an e-book than for a hardcover. Well I do not know how the business works.


message 28: by Dwhith (new)

Dwhith | 4 comments Try alibis.com. I get all of my "paper" books there. The independent booksellers who sell from the sight are from all over the world. My last book was shipped from a seller in Britian. The prices are reasonable, and I have yet to look for a book that I could not find.


message 29: by Bee (new)

Bee (morgaine620) Thanks for the Tip sounds good and well I got a kindle for Christmas ~ will be interesting to see how I get on with it :-)


message 30: by Ian (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 352 comments You'll love it Bee


message 31: by Cateline (new)

Cateline Alibis is good, but I seem to find more "out of the way" books on ABE Books. Of course, like many others here, I use Amazon/Amazon Marketplace extensively.
We do have a local Library Sale every month, and books are available there for a dollar or two. Paperbacks are usually 50 cents [U.S].

The neat thing about ABE and Amazon Marketplace, and I suppose Alibis as well, is it is a way to still support independent booksellers.

Oh, and don't forget Powells Books on line. I'd love to visit their brick and mortar store! Wowser.


message 32: by Bee (new)

Bee (morgaine620) Loads of interesting suggestions. Well Amazon was buggering around with my data. I used to send my Christmas presents to Germany via Amazon and had some Addresses saved with them. When I started with the kindle reader on my phone they just changed my billing address to one of my friends addresses. I asked them how this could have happened and they just answered: Oh please go to settings of your kindle and change it back!" DUH?????!!!! I wrote that that really does not answer my question and again how could this happen and I have not gotten an answer yet. Really annoyed and wonder if I should leave them.


message 33: by Cateline (new)

Cateline That is weird. I wonder if it was something to do with the order/way addresses were listed on your phone? Those touch screens can be a nuisance, even though pretty neat.
It seems, sometimes, that if I breathe on the screen it registers. :)


message 34: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments I've had a few problems with amazon, deliveries and such. I found that if I call them, customer service is very good and they'll do just about anything to right the mistakes. You get no sense of that from their e-mails, which seem very pro forma. I use skype to call, so the cost is minimal.


message 35: by Cateline (new)

Cateline James wrote: "I've had a few problems with amazon, deliveries and such. I found that if I call them, customer service is very good and they'll do just about anything to right the mistakes. You get no sense of th..."
I'm in South Louisiana [USA], and on the Help page there is a feature that gives us the choice of phone or email. If you click for phone, they'll phone you. Maybe the European equivalent is different.
But Skype is wonderful.


message 36: by Bee (last edited Dec 31, 2011 01:01PM) (new)

Bee (morgaine620) well I did not change anything nothing came up that I could have changed I changed everything back to normal in the settings at the kindle afterwards and still have not got an answer from Amazon. That is worrying :-( Cateline wrote: "That is weird. I wonder if it was something to do with the order/way addresses were listed on your phone? Those touch screens can be a nuisance, even though pretty neat.
It seems, sometimes, t..."



message 37: by Bee (new)

Bee (morgaine620) That might be an idea ~ will try to call them next week thanks for the tipJames wrote: "I've had a few problems with amazon, deliveries and such. I found that if I call them, customer service is very good and they'll do just about anything to right the mistakes. You get no sense of th..."


message 38: by Ian (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 352 comments I agree with Jim. I've always found Amazon customer service (by phone) is ace - but that's from the UK.


message 39: by Florence (new)

Florence Wetzel (florencewetzel) | 111 comments I use the public library! They have a great interlibrary loan system. This can get tricky, though, if you want to read a series in order and someone else has the book.


message 40: by Nina Susanna (new)

Nina Susanna (ninasusanna) | 6 comments From public library. I'm used to use library since my early childhood so I don't mind if I have to wait few week some good book :)


message 41: by Eva (new)

Eva | 41 comments awesomebooks.com Great service and great prices :)


message 42: by Florence (new)

Florence Wetzel (florencewetzel) | 111 comments Nina Susanna wrote: "From public library. I'm used to use library since my early childhood so I don't mind if I have to wait few week some good book :)"

:)


message 43: by Ancestral (new)

Ancestral Gaidheal (gaidheal) I get to preview upcoming books as a review for a well known book seller, I am also a member of a audio book club, and I mooch books (book swap sites). Keeps me in books. I would use the library, if it was open the hours I could visit.


message 44: by Sharon, Moderator (Netherlands) (new)

Sharon | 2435 comments Mod
Jim, I have a problem and do not know where in the Goodreads group to discuss it but it truly is driving me nuts. I get excellent prices and quicker European books in English on the iBook store. But time and time again I cannot get my iBook to switch edition to! I often get the publisher, sometimes not, but no E book for instance. My last two Hakan Nesser books are good examples Pantheon E Books and no category.
Hilarious as there is a massive long discussion group ....do you use iPad, Kobo, on and on. Perhaps this is a discussion to direct there but what do you think? Know you have curious events with publishers from the writers side, have you any tips about this? S


message 45: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments Hi Sharon. I have a Kindle but don't use it much. I seldom pay for a book since I review for NYJB. Publishers send them lists for review, and they pick the books they think I would like and offer them to me. I've made some great discoveries through them. If I want a book, I get it from Net Galley. I request it from them, they get the publisher to send it to me, either as paper or download. The only problem for me is S&S, as they have their own software and so can only be read on iPad or computer. Last week, they were out of dead tree ARCs of a book, so I said I couldn't review it (I won't read a book on a computer), and they found a paperback for me. Given the work you're doing and your credentials, I think you can get a Net Galley account. Give it a try. If you like, contact New York Journal of Books, tell them about yourself and ask if you can review for them. Use me for a reference, and I'm pretty sure they'll accept you, then you get the Net Galley account for sure.


message 46: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments Sharon wrote: "Jim, I have a problem and do not know where in the Goodreads group to discuss it but it truly is driving me nuts. I get excellent prices and quicker European books in English on the iBook store. ..."

I'm sorry Sharon, I got your work/credentials mixed up in my head with Naomi's. Everything above still holds, but I don't know what you do for a living. NYJB asks that reviewers be experts on books in a particular genre, and i don't know your background. Still, given your level of activity, I THINK they'll accept you. And do use me for a reference. Caveat: If someone else has already reviewed or laid claim to a book you want, you're out of luck. Just one review per book. So you have to watch net galley to see what's coming and look at the NYJB to see what's been reviewed. Often, a book I want has been released, but nobody has asked for it. So I just write and ask permission to review it, and they try to get it for me. They're a really nice crew at NYJB. Sometimes, I just go ahead and get them straight from the author. NYJB gives you street cred and authors usually are happy to be asked.


message 47: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 310 comments Sharon wrote: "Jim, I have a problem and do not know where in the Goodreads group to discuss it but it truly is driving me nuts. I get excellent prices and quicker European books in English on the iBook store. ..."

Heh, and ironically, I get 1st dibs on the Nesser books, have his next for release in August already loaded in my Kindle. I would share it with you but it's verbotten.


message 48: by Anna (last edited Jun 14, 2012 09:35AM) (new)

Anna (aetm) | 228 comments I *think* iBooks store should still respect the country specifics the publishers set (otherwise it would drive publishers crazy?). Like for Nesbø's Phantom, which is supposed to be out in US in September but is out in UK and Canada (and probably Australia). I just searched on my iPad, where the iBooks, billing etc addresses are 100 % set to US, and it actually does find Nesbø's Phantom on the store. If I hadn't bought Phantom already in UK a few weeks ago, I think I'd test it right now.
- would anyone else who wants to read Phantom, and uses iBooks store that has the country set to US want to try to see if it purchases and downloads or if it comes with an error?
Or it would work with any other example where the book is published already in UK, but not in US when you have a US billing address set up, or vice versa.

If it would work without errors, that sounds like a neat workaround for getting some of the books faster than waiting for their official release date when they are out somewhere else first...
There's nothing mentioned about the different publishing dates for different countries when the book is in the same language http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4059

This might be interesting for the writers http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5071

--- edit: I tested with Nesbø's Phantom. It showed the price in the store; when I clicked on it, it went to "Pre-Order" as a text for the button. So it's not out yet and it probably will be out when the analog book will also be (same publisher, Knopf).


message 49: by Sharon, Moderator (Netherlands) (new)

Sharon | 2435 comments Mod
I wish Goodreads would get with it and put the iBook editions on for members to select! Very annoying.

Why, because consistently iBook store is quicker and better priced than the big mighty Amazon.com kindle selections for European books / writers, which I prefer both to read and in commercial terms.

iPad you can read anything from anywhere....app available. But kindle you are stuck for choice.


message 50: by Sharon, Moderator (Netherlands) (new)

Sharon | 2435 comments Mod
James wrote: "Sharon wrote: "Jim, I have a problem and do not know where in the Goodreads group to discuss it but it truly is driving me nuts. I get excellent prices and quicker European books in English on the..."

Lucky you...enjoy. I am still working through the ones I have of HN. Got carried away and loaded my iPad up in iBook and Kindle and Kobo. Plus still working through a stack of paper books I ordered for my retirement.
My problem is I read authors. So end up back tracking to catch up on a new author and then when my authors on my list publish new books it grows again. So my luxurious problem in retirement is too much to read and only so much time! Yep, even now that I am freeeeeee :-)


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