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C S Lewis series?

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message 1: by Zeke (new)

Zeke (echoteecat) | 2 comments For the last few episodes of S&L Tom and Veronica (mostly Tom) have talked about recommending the C S Lewis series as a good fantasy series.

This has thrown me for a spin every time because C S Lewis wrote another series where a hapless linguist gets bottled up in a spaceship and sent off to other planets. I read it more recently than the Chronicles, and my brain has somehow cross-wired itself to think of the Space Trilogy first. I personally like Lewis' Space trilogy, but I have yet to find anyone else who has read it.

For those that haven't read it, there's Out of the Silent Planet (which I always call Malacandra) where the hapless linguist is sent to a planet called Malacandra. The second the linguist is bottled up in a coffin-like thing and sent off to Perelandra. The third is That Hideous Strength, and I believe it stays here on Earth, but I honestly haven't read it because I keep getting sidetracked.

I don't intend to spoil the series, but has anyone else read this or am I completely alone in my madness? Are there any other people in the goodreads forum that have done this with other series?


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 489 comments hi

i read the Space Trilogy years ago, and loved Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra, but hated That Hideous Strength. It was partly because it was such a change of mood from the 'planetary romance' style of the earlier books, but I also remember it as being very ranty and anti-science. Also the same smug preachiness that spoilt the later Narnia books for me became rather too much too take.


message 3: by Otto (new)

Otto (andrewlinke) | 110 comments I haven't read That Hideous Strength yet... it felt bit dry.
The other two were great reads when I was a teen. I've been meaning to re-read them.

Yes. Lewis's work can be a bit preachy sometimes... but what do you expect from someone who was known primarily for his radio sermons and theological texts?


message 4: by Peter (new)

Peter | 142 comments Andrew wrote:

Yes. Lewis's work can be a bit preachy sometimes....but what do you expect from someone who was known primarily for his radio sermons and theological texts?"


we'll Lewis was an atheist before writing Narnia, and Screwtape Letters and some of his later works, in fact i think his Space trilogy was written when he was an atheist


message 5: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments Peter wrote: "in fact i think his Space trilogy was written when he was an atheist ."

Very definitely not. The first book is essentially an essay on why space travel goes against God's will, dressed up with a bit of plot.


message 6: by Peter (new)

Peter | 142 comments Sean wrote: "Peter wrote: "in fact i think his Space trilogy was written when he was an atheist ."

Very definitely not. The first book is essentially an essay on why space travel goes against God's will, dress..."


ah, I've never read it, should have looked it up before posting :D LOL

according to Wiki Lewis wrote it to deal "with what Lewis saw as the de-humanising trends in contemporary science fiction." Which I can fully understand, a lot of Sci-Fi does just that.


message 7: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 489 comments Peter wrote: "according to Wiki Lewis wrote it to deal "with what Lewis saw as the de-humanising trends in contemporary science fiction." Which I can fully understand, a lot of Sci-Fi does just that.."

do you think? i guess it depends on what SF you read. personally, i think SF at its best explores what it is to be human perhaps better than any other genre.

for me personally, i find Lewis' writing to be tainted with the evangelicalism of the convert (although even his 'atheism' seems to have been of a strangely theistic type, waiting for an argument to convince him rather than actually grounded in critical thinking). I think the contrast between Lewis and Tolkien is evident in a long running argument they had. While both devout Christians (Tolkien had in fact been instrumental in Lewis' conversion), Lewis argued that all their writing should foreground their faith and glorify god, while Tolkien firmly believed the story came first and that the belief was best expressed in the underlying themes.


message 8: by Peter (new)

Peter | 142 comments Paul 'Pezter' wrote: "do you think? i guess it depends on what SF you read. personally, i think SF at its best explores what it is to be human perhaps better than any other genre."

I'm not saying all SF does that, but one of the strong themes that runs through SF is taking out religion or any other social element because they aren't "hard" science, which in turn can very much dehumanize the story.

Lewis and Tolkien had a lot of arguments about their writing styles, Tolkien didn't like that Lewis but Father Christmas and other mythological creatures into his stories, where as Tolkien made up most of his (outside of elves, but he was the first to bring the "modern" concept of elves about).

As for Lewis' atheism, it was closer to the true definition of atheism than the modern anti-theist beliefs, closer to agnostic views.


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