Readers Against Prejudice and Racism discussion

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Group Discussions > How can we prevent prejudice and racism from spreading?

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message 1: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
I think there are many ways that we can prevent prejudice from spreading. One of the ways I was thinking about was to set up anti-prejudice and racism groups around teh world so that way many people would know about the horrible effects it had on the world and how they can prevent it.

What ways do you think people could prevent prejudice from spreading?


message 2: by Tammy (new)

Tammy | 49 comments Mod
I feel that we should be exposed to different cultures and thier traditions. One of the things I love most about America is that it's a melting pot of diversity. I enjoy learning about people and thier families. The traditions they carry based on race and religion. Understanding and empathising with people different from us in some way will not only enrich your own world but eradicate the fear that many have when faced with what they don't understand. Fear is one of the biggest causes of racism and any kind of hatred.


message 3: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Sometimes it's not necessarily fear of the other, though, as it is insecurity - like bullies. It's also often fear of losing power, like the plantation owners of the American south. So, if we can help everybody in the world to feel secure, they'll have less reason to lash out. I don't think we want missionaries to go in and mess up people's traditions, but we do want to share compassion & help people with respect - a la' Peace Corp.


message 4: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
I agree with both of you Tammy and Cheryl, especially the part about learning more about other countries cultures and traditions. I think that we should have festivals that embraces the other countries' cultures such as the Greek Festivals and also, for T.V. there should be less shows that makes fun of other countries' cultures and should show more of embracing other countries' cultures rather than stray away from them.


message 5: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 100 comments Think of how lucky we are living in the US with such an amalgamation of cultures. We thnk nothng of going out go eat Chinese, Peruvian, Ethiopian, Japanese, Italian, Indian, Mexican, etc. All the "foreign" words that have crept into our language-patio, sombrero, foyer, chutzpah, and so many more that have enrichened us. Look at the holidaytraditions we're exposed to! The reality of our open communications unlike some countries which restrict their populations' access.


message 6: by Tammy (new)

Tammy | 49 comments Mod
My point exactly Kathy! I love diversity and new experiences.


message 7: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Me too!! I love exploring different cultures like China, Russia, France, Jamaica, Japan, Italy, Greece, Spain and so many many more! It's so interesting seeing how other cultures live their lives and what we could do to learn more about their cultures!


message 8: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Kathy wrote: "Think of how lucky we are living in the US with such an amalgamation of cultures. We thnk nothng of going out go eat Chinese, Peruvian, Ethiopian, Japanese, Italian, Indian, Mexican, etc. All the "..."

Well, that is, if you live in or near a city. Lots of people don't. Lots of people can't afford to go out to eat, either. I know you mean well, but careless assumptions like this are what cause trouble. Saying 'we' without thinking about who 'we' actually includes is asking for trouble.

(Not picking on you personally - just noticing what tends to happen. :)


message 9: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 100 comments Cheryl wrote: "Kathy wrote: "Think of how lucky we are living in the US with such an amalgamation of cultures. We thnk nothng of going out go eat Chinese, Peruvian, Ethiopian, Japanese, Italian, Indian, Mexican, ..."

Good point! I am lucky in where I live...


message 10: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) I think that 'cosmopolitan' is a good word representing a healthy attitude. It's too bad rural and isolated people don't always have the opportunities lucky people like you do. Thanks for understanding that I wasn't scolding you. :)


message 11: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 100 comments No worries. Everybody needs a "pull-up" every once in awhile if only to realize there are other realities out there!


message 12: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) I believe that a lot of reading opens up the mind and the heart to the reality of other people-their experiences, their humanity- as well as providing some insight into the evil of prejudice and the suffering it causes.


message 13: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Well said Ellie!! I agree that if more people read more about the experiences that various cultures have to suffer throught racism and prejudice, then they might understand about how terrible racism and prejudice really is.

I also think another way to prevent racism and prejudice from spreading is to prevent racism and prejudice from becoming apart of all the country's cultures so that way, it would be easier to take out racism and prejudice from society.


message 14: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) Unfortunately, it may be too late for that. Of course, my experience is very limited. Certainly, I fear that racism & prejudice are so woven into the fabric of US culture that they need to be pulled out strand by strand.

Or by reaching the young as soon and as much as possible.
But again, that's primarily thru education. One of the problems I have with home schooling is that it prevents the child from really encountering difference. It's hard enough when real estate (& hence public schools) already work in that direction but home schooling, I think, can (depending on the parent of course) keep a family's prejudices alive & thriving.


message 15: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 100 comments I do agree with Ellie that reading can open up one's mind but the reader also has to be open to empathizing with the characters. I think fear is what causes most prejudice. If we could eliminate more of the fear perhaps by identifying what it is that someone fears about that culture. By determining the fears and reducing/eliminating them, I think we could make some progress.


message 16: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
I agree with you both Kathy and Ellie! Ellie, I also think that homeschooling might not help many children be exposed to different cultures that public schools can do because it's just you and your parent and your parents have to decide whether or not they should discuss about prejudice and racism with their child. I also agree that the US has a lot to sort through before they come to the point where hatred is not worth it in society. Even to this very day, you still see racism and prejudice on TV and in real life and it's sad.

Kathy, I also agree that fear is the main problem in creating prejudice and racism among other cultures. If more people just have the opportunity to experience other cultures rather than listen to the hateful things being said about the other cultures, then I think we can pull through with trying to make sure that racism and prejudice does not corrupt our society.


message 17: by Holly (new)

Holly | 2 comments In view of the terrible killings that recently happened in Utoya, Norway, I would like to join this discussion and recommend an ebook that I have just read. This is the first time I have actually been involved in a discussion, so please be patient!
I have just read a nove, called Channelled, about teenagers who are pagan and find themselves up against a wave of prejudice and hate directed against immigration in their community. Going against her normally peaceful nature a Christian girl who is deeply involved in the ideals of her religion is briefly turned extremist by this wave of hate. She is terrorised by the fear of an Islamic takeover of Britain. The wiccan girl finds herself driven almost to the point of breaking her wiccan vow to ‘harm none’ as they confront each other over the Christian girl’s fundamentalism. What I love about this story is the catharsis (close your eyes if you don’t want the climax of the plot revealed!) when the characters understand that the hate comes from fear of being overwhelmed and/or overthrown by another religion or culture. Fear and hate takes over a person’s mind, leaving the rational thoughts paralysed. Does anyone else know of fiction books that have addressed this issue?
Channelled


message 18: by Will (last edited Jul 26, 2011 04:51PM) (new)

Will Granger | 5 comments I think we do need to start with the youth. How many people understand the reasons behind the Middle eastern conflicts between the Jews and the Muslims? It seems to be a never-ending battle, and neither side can see the position of the other.


message 19: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Oh yes! What happened with the killings in Norway? How did it get started?

Will, I agree that the only way to prevent racism and prejudice from spreading is through the younger generation, who will stand up and tell whoever is fighting that they need to stop because it's senseless to keep on fighting for so many years when the event that happened years ago is now over. I often get irritated whenever people keep on hating the other cultures for a war that happened many years ago.


message 20: by Will (new)

Will Granger | 5 comments Ronyell, I think it is sort of like when you are having a dispute with someone, and it goes on and on, and in the end, no one wins or feels better. It seems simple, but at some point you have to just let it go.


message 21: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Will wrote: "Ronyell, I think it is sort of like when you are having a dispute with someone, and it goes on and on, and in the end, no one wins or feels better. It seems simple, but at some point you have to ju..."

Exactly! I don't know about what is so hard about letting disputes go! I mean, it's like whenever two different sides are fighting, they refuse to forget about all the sorrow that happened during times of war and it's a shame because it prevents other cultures from learning about other cultures.


message 22: by Holly (new)

Holly | 2 comments Ronyell wrote: "Oh yes! What happened with the killings in Norway? How did it get started?

Will, I agree that the only way to prevent racism and prejudice from spreading is through the younger generation, who w..."


What happened in Norway is that one man decided that if he didn't do something drastic then Norway and all of Europe will fall to the Islamic extremists. So he set off a bomb in the capital city and then, while the police were distracted, he went off to a summer camp for young people who supported the governing political party, and started shooting... You're right,Will; young people need to learn about what's behind something like this. That's why I like this book so much... it's a good story with lovely (really lovely!) characters, but it talks about what is going on beneath the glossy culture that we see on tv. In this book, at the climax of the battle to resist the hate, one of the characters, a young wiccan, cries out; “Hear me as I name you! You are hatred! You burn witches, you massacre druids, you gas Jews. You slaughter Christians and Muslims and Sikhs and Hindus. You destroy life in the name of religion. You wage war in the name of God! In the name of God! A Holy War?! No war is holy. War is unholy. You are unholy! Subside! Subside! Do you see us gathered here? We are Witch, and Christian and Druid and Hindu and philosopher and we stand together against you! Subside!” It made me cry. Religious hatred has been going on for so long... isn't it about time we learned? If you're interested, the book is:
Channelled


message 23: by Manybooks (last edited Jul 28, 2011 03:15PM) (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments One problem with Western Europe is that for the longest time, many have downplayed the danger of right-wing, Neo-Nazi like extremism in most of the continent (except perhaps, Germany). By downplaying the problems, and by claiming that most of the problems only occurred in Germany and even there, rather rarely, Europe has in fact enabled right-wing extremism (allowing right wing extremists to proliferate) while the authorities focused on the Islamists or pretended that Neo-Nazism was not all that much of a problem. Truth is, that the former is a pan-European problem (in France and in Italy, extreme anti-immigration parties routinely win local elections, it's a real and present danger).

And what about the extremists in the United States, and likely in Canada? The Norwegian terror-guy should be seen as another Timothy McVeigh, and there is a real danger from anti-government, militia groups in the United States. And what about Glenn Beck comparing the youth camp to the Hitler Youth? I think he has finally lost his marbles, if not, he is very dangerous.

I will also say that it bugs me to no end that when a Muslim is accused of terrorism, all Muslims are often accused of terrorism or are seen as potential terrorists. Christian extremists, Muslim extremists, ALL extremists are basically the same, birds of a feather. However, they are, for the most part, still a minority, and by people reacting to them, by people claiming that "all" Muslims are terrorists or that "all" Christians are thus (some comments on the news-sites were along these lines), we are playing right into the extremists' hands, we are allowing the extremists to win, and we are giving them a platform to spew their hatred.


message 24: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 100 comments Gundula wrote: "One problem with Western Europe is that for the longest time, many have downplayed the danger of right-wing, Neo-Nazi like extremism in most of the continent (except perhaps, Germany). By downplay..."

I agree. Extremism is extremism and wrong no matter what the religion, socioeconomic group, race, or alien planet of origin.


message 25: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments Kathy wrote: "Gundula wrote: "One problem with Western Europe is that for the longest time, many have downplayed the danger of right-wing, Neo-Nazi like extremism in most of the continent (except perhaps, German..."

My theory has generally been that at its extremes, the right wing and the left wing meet, at least politically and morally. All extremists are basically alike and pose similar dangers.


message 26: by Will (new)

Will Granger | 5 comments I think that it may be difficult, depending on one's ideology, to define what extreme really means. I think people are always going to disagree, but someone with a different opinion is not necessarily an extremist. I think that instead of using the word "extreme", I see people who hate other groups as the real danger. True hatred seems to lead to violence and killing.


message 27: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Davie (kathydavie) | 100 comments Any one who believes that violence is the answer to their hatred or against someone who believes or is different from them is going to extremes


message 28: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments Kathy wrote: "Any one who believes that violence is the answer to their hatred or against someone who believes or is different from them is going to extremes"

Exactly, and it does not matter from what "side" that violence comes from ...


message 29: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Gundula wrote: "One problem with Western Europe is that for the longest time, many have downplayed the danger of right-wing, Neo-Nazi like extremism in most of the continent (except perhaps, Germany). By downplay..."

That is so true Gundula and it is also so sad. It's like everytime a war happens, people have some kind of excuse to put the blame on a group of people or a culture that was not involved in the war, especially labeling Muslims as "terrorists" which I think is truly disgraceful. If people continue to give extremists who believe in spreading hatred towards the world enough attention, then the world would become a terrible place indeed.


Blood Bone and Muscle | 24 comments Alright, I know this subject seems watered down and stubble compared to the most extreme cases but here is something within a community.

Our school is hosting a multicultural day against racism and ethnocentrism. Sadly, as I act as the advertisement figure to promote bringing fourth your culture I hold fear about insulting someone by seemingly boxing their heritage as them. I know it's not such thing but it stills drives me queasy knowing I would never know.

Does anyone happen to have idealistic way to approach this? Or... some pep talk? :/


message 31: by Vincent (new)

Vincent Chough | 17 comments I think efforts like the ones here on GR do a lot. We must create space for the discussion. I read Lady Danielle's post here.

This has inspired me to share my experience in a more open manner here.

NOTE--->>> the two links in this comment are within the goodreads site.


Blood Bone and Muscle | 24 comments Funny you should post a beautiful narrative against black racism, it really touches to the subject.

The social justice group I'm part of is formed of about 14 people and three of those are white, including the teacher and myself. At least half are practising Muslims.

The difficulty comes when you have to recruit people who aren't part of the team and might not see how open you are about moral and cultural differences ((I mean, I met people who drank cows blood, believe me, I don't have the heart to judge)) as well as you're not looking at them as the stereotype of the country they hold ties to. Only as someone who may or may not want to teach.


message 33: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Blood Bone and Muscle wrote: "Alright, I know this subject seems watered down and stubble compared to the most extreme cases but here is something within a community.

Our school is hosting a multicultural day against racism an..."


I also have fears about insulting other cultures if I wanted to host a multicultural event because I might not have the information about the other culture to really bring out what the culture is all about. I would probably try to read up on the culture that I'm planning on presenting at a multicultural event so that way, I would have some kind of knowledge about the culture I'm presenting without worrying about insulting the other cultures.


Blood Bone and Muscle | 24 comments I guess, but when you're trying to get other people who live with the multicultural environment already set you don't want to sound like you only see the people as different.

Like one girl that speaks fluent Russian at home along with two other languages might feel like we're putting her into a category and turning to her to help build up the walls.


 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 101 comments Ronyell, I've been part of diversity seminars, and they don't have to be targeted at a specific race/ethnicity. Just invite whoever wants to come and people can share what they are and how diversity issues have impacted them. It's a great opportunity to expand one's understanding in numerous ways. I think even those of us who feel like we have a handle on ethnicity issues, still have a lot to learn.


message 36: by Vincent (new)

Vincent Chough | 17 comments Seminars can help, but it also entails taking risk. Much of the responsibility remains largely on the shoulders of "those of color".

Why you ask? Because when you discuss these issues with one of your own tribe, it is a debate - no prophet is accepted in his own country.

When I expose myself in day-to-day situations where others get to know me - even though I look different - they end up realizing that I'm flesh and blood just like them.

Here in Buenos Aires I try to go out of my way to make contact. Talk about the weather, about sports, whatever, but strike up a conversation. The other person inevitably asks questions and the learning and exchange process begins...


message 37: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "Ronyell, I've been part of diversity seminars, and they don't have to be targeted at a specific race/ethnicity. Just invite whoever wants to come and people can share what they are and how diversi..."

Well said Danielle! I think just letting people join the seminars and see what they are like is the best way to allow people to explore diversity on many different levels.


message 38: by Ronyell, Your Humble Creator! (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 688 comments Mod
Blood Bone and Muscle wrote: "I guess, but when you're trying to get other people who live with the multicultural environment already set you don't want to sound like you only see the people as different.

Like one girl that s..."


I agree that it's never a good idea to make people from other cultures feel left out because the seminars might only discuss one culture when they have opportunities to allow people from many other cultures to talk about their countries.


Blood Bone and Muscle | 24 comments Ronyell wrote: "Blood Bone and Muscle wrote: "I guess, but when you're trying to get other people who live with the multicultural environment already set you don't want to sound like you only see the people as dif..."

I'm not even remotely old enough to know when a seminar is or if I'm able to join (also the fact that I'm part of a minority culture where I live means only the things that come from that minority are mentioned).

It's not so much that but getting over the nail biting fear of making someone who really wants to fit in feel like they have to pulled back out of the comfort zone. :/


message 40: by Vincent (new)

Vincent Chough | 17 comments I just blogged about the recent shootings at Oikos Univ. One method of prevention is raising awareness. There are racial issues involved and discussed. If interested you can check it out here:

http://identitylovefaith.wordpress.com/

(Note: I am a Christian and the blog post reflects this vision openly.)


message 41: by Manybooks (last edited Apr 05, 2012 04:49AM) (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments Raising awareness is one thing, but not only about racism and prejudice, but also about mental illness. The gunman obviously had severe issues, but nothing was done, or maybe nothing could be done legally until it was too late.

It is also important to look at how discrimination, how nastiness about one's language skills can be very traumatic. The gunman was seemingly harassed or teased (and by a college administrator at that) about his "poor" English language skills. I had a similar experience in high school, when an ignorant teacher said that I was being bullied because I was too lazy to lose my German accent (I think we had been in Canada for four years, and maybe he could not understand that I still had an accent while my siblings did not, but the comment hurt, and imagine, if I had been facing psychiatric issues at the time and reacted in a violent, nasty way).

We do need better ESL and EFL instruction in North America, but harassing individuals about their language skills is just not acceptable. Yes, if you cannot understand someone's English, you should be able to tell them that, but you must never be vicious or bullying about it, (if someone has language skills issues, they need assistance, education, support, not condemnation). In my opinion, one of the main problems is that especially Asian students often come to North America to attend university and college, having good writing and reading skills, but poor to almost non-existent oral and aural skills (and the TOEFL does not really test those skills either). I am not saying that providing better ESL or EFL instruction (especially in areas like communication and pronunciation) would have absolutely prevented this tragedy, but I do know that many Asian students are very frustrated with and by learning how to speak English, how to communicate in English, and it is one of the areas of ESL in North America which has severe gaps (especially at the college and university level).


message 42: by Vincent (new)

Vincent Chough | 17 comments Great input Gundula. It makes me think about the importance of training educators in general, especially in schools for kids K-12.


message 43: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments Vincent wrote: "Great input Gundula. It makes me think about the importance of training educators in general, especially in schools for kids K-12."

And not just training educators, but also having speech therapists available for those with pronunciation problems (and I don't mean just ESL learners, kids who stammer and stutter are also bullied, and just imagine if you were an ESL learner, but also had problems with stuttering etc.).


 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 101 comments I've seen a lot of that narrow-minded prejudice towards students/teachers who are from another country and who have accents, but otherwise understand English (although even if they don't that's still not okay). At my college, it was especially bad. Drove me crazy.


message 45: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "I've seen a lot of that narrow-minded prejudice towards students/teachers who are from another country and who have accents, but otherwise understand English (although even if they don't that's sti..."

If the accent makes the students/professors hard to understand, that can be a problem. However, often even a bit of an accent is enough to cause prejudice. Once, when I was teaching German 101 at university, there was a student from Manila who had an almost perfect accent when he spoke German, but whose English was sometimes a little hard to understand. I had a reasonably good rapport with my students, until the final oral exam, when this student (and deservedly so) got 95% on his oral German presentation (the other students, mostly WASP were amazingly offended by the fact that this "foreign" student who "could not speak proper English" got a better oral German mark than they did (that both of his oral and written German language skills were vastly superior to most of the other students, and mostly because he worked at it and came to office hours when he had questions, did not matter, they just did not think he should have had the highest mark, even though he deserved it, very frustrating)


 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 101 comments I think it was more the fact that instructor wasn't American was the issue, because if you listened, you could understand most of what was said.


message 47: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 147 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "I think it was more the fact that instructor wasn't American was the issue, because if you listened, you could understand most of what was said."

Wow, that's annoying.


message 48: by Robert (new)

Robert H. (turnup85) | 3 comments Thanks to some new science about humanity, it makes the elimination of racism and prejudice much easier to prevent. It only requires education starting at the grade-school level to counteract all the hatred and discrimination that we inadvertently pass on to our children. Our Road To Hatred--How We Raise our Bullies
Robert H. Feuerstein


message 49: by Starapple (last edited Nov 30, 2013 11:25AM) (new)

Starapple (starappleakaafrobyte) | 8 comments I am very lucky to have LIVED (not visited on a holiday) all over the world (Africa: Tanzania, Malawi, Kenya, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), USA: New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Arizona, Europe: Germany (born there), Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Greece, Netherlands, Belgium, France, Caribbean: Jamaica and Cuba.

We now live in London, United Kingdom, and unless something is going to happen I will most likely die here.

I LOVE the UK. Its so multi-cultural and full of people from all over the world. We enjoy a good lifestyle, where we are nearly all the same (from a social system standpoint). We have the NHS (National Health Service) which has its problems, but they are nothing compared to the good it does. Always able to see a doctor or specialist or dentist when one is sick and not having to worry about the cost is absolutely amazing. A similar system is in Germany, Spain and France as well.

I cannot Understand why the US does not have a similar system, but I think its all part of the rich wanting to keep the not-haves down. We also do not have this food stamp system like in the US. I don't know how I would feel if I was on foodstamps and had to use them to buy food. This creates classes and prejudices. When I lived in the US as a teenager I found the system skewed in favour of the white population or those with money. I may be wrong but this was my perception in the mid 1970's.

Sadly here in Europe the view of the Black American is poor (high proportion of children out of wedlock, higher rate of baby deaths, higher percentage of males in jail, drug abuse, gangs, etc). I always have to work against this, and its not easy.

We also have a very high influx of Africans, and many people make fun of them, because of their accents, or because they are not yet fully westernised or europeanised, compared to the black West Indians that came to the UK in the 1930's to 1960's. They may have funny accents, but they are well educated and have a better command of the written english language than original brits themselves.

Of course its not all sunshine here. We have some British people living in some areas which have a very strong ethnic influx (birds of the same feather like to flock together), who feel threatened by the influx of blacks or other ethnic/religious groups and join right wing groups. This was very evident when the white Soldier Lee Rigby was attacked and killed. At first all blacks (the guys who killed Rigby) were bad, then it moved to all black muslims are bad including all muslims. When the black community of all colours and religions, the black soldiers and the black policemen etc., came together to show their support to the soldiers family and all soldiers in general. It kind of took the wind out of the right wingers sails to sprout their hatred. However the local mosque is still receiving police protection at times.

I thought very hard and long about all this racism and prejudice and have found that over the years, there will always be someone out there hating someone else because of their looks/skin colour, religion, job/career, beliefs, knowledge, health impediment, money/wealth, type of car, size of house etc....

If we start at home we can only hope that the kids carry it forward, but as some have said above, if some grow up in a bubble they will carry their negativity forward to the next generation and so forth. So I don't think we can ever be all equal or live in a world without prejudice or racism.

Good books to read is the "Animal Farm" by George Orwell and "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding. I found them quite disturbing but would still fit in well these days. "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others", i.e. "All men are equal, but some men are more equal than others".


message 50: by Starapple (new)

Starapple (starappleakaafrobyte) | 8 comments Robert wrote: "Thanks to some new science about humanity, it makes the elimination of racism and prejudice much easier to prevent. It only requires education starting at the grade-school level to counteract all t..."

I would wish it was so, however the first few years the children are moulded at home. And then the kids take their knowledge home, which is then debunked by their parents/family/friends.

It has to be broad and wide sweeping, starting with laws which are enforced to stop racism. It won't stop it, but it will become harder for racists to operate.


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