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message 1: by Sally, la reina (new)

Sally (mrsnolte) | 17346 comments Mod
I live within two miles of the house in which I grew up. How many of you also live in the same hometown or very near to it?


message 2: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24360 comments Mod
I don't, but two of my siblings do. My sister is sending her kids to the same school we all went to.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Not me, I live about 200kms south of where I grew up(and wish it was further).


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I'm an Army brat, so I've lived way too many places to have a hometown. I've lived in Olympia 12 years, which surprises me.


message 5: by Sally, la reina (new)

Sally (mrsnolte) | 17346 comments Mod
What is that, 38 miles?


message 6: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments I live about 75 miles(120kms) from where I grew up. It seems almost perfect for us.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

200 kms converts to 124 miles.


message 8: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments 3000 miles.


message 9: by Phoenix (new)

Phoenix (phoenixapb) | 1619 comments 1413 mi and some days that is not far enough!


message 10: by Jan (new)

Jan | 241 comments Same state, different city.


message 11: by janine (new)

janine | 7715 comments i live a 30 minute drive (depending on traffic) from where i grew up. i moved from the country to a city.


message 12: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca White (rebecca_white) | 1028 comments I was an Army brat too, so I lived many different places. But now I live in my mother's home town, which I also spent some years in as a kid.


message 13: by Shirley (new)

Shirley (shirleythekindlereader) I was born in Denver, Colorado. I lived in Aurora until second grade. We moved to Southern California and although I still live in So. Ca. I am at least 80 miles from where we lived when I was a child.
I think when we moved to Banning (in 1990) both my husband and I were looking for rural from our childhoods. We had cow pastures next to us until 2003 when they built new homes.


message 14: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I think we've talked about what types of neighborhoods we live in and some of this emerged in those conversations...but not in this detail.

I grew up on the far northwest side of Chicago in a cop/fireman working class neighborhood. I live about 120 miles away in a small Wisconsin town north of Milwaukee. I moved here, oh, fourteen years ago? Can't remember. Anyway, I'm glad I moved...I didn't grow up or branch out until I left what I knew.


message 15: by Dr. Detroit (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6031 comments I'm jealous of any and all small-towners. I'm thinking that living my life as if I'm part of the Federal Witness Protection Program would sure suit my lifestyle needs right about now.


message 16: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments 400 or 500 miles, but we were only there til I was three in any case.


message 17: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments I don't live anywhere close to the place I was born. I think it's cool when people have lived the same place their whole life. I'm shooting for that with my daughters, at least until they can decide to move on their own.


message 18: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments smetchie wrote: "I don't live anywhere close to the place I was born. I think it's cool when people have lived the same place their whole life. I'm shooting for that with my daughters, at least until they can decid..."

I've always admired that, since I had the opposite experience, but I think both are valuable in their own way.


message 19: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments Clark wrote: "I'm jealous of any and all small-towners. I'm thinking that living my life as if I'm part of the Federal Witness Protection Program would sure suit my lifestyle needs right about now."

Clark, you and I have small-towner envy. :-)


message 20: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I'm shooting for that with my daughters, at least until they can decide to move on their own.

I agree with this in that I want my kids to grow up and stay here until college. But some of these people that never leave the town ever are a little scary. I want my kids to get out in the world some, too.


message 21: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments I think both are valuable in their own way.

I'm sure this is true. I'm just bitter about all the times I had to change schools as a kid.


message 22: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments No argument. I was the lucky one, cause we seemed to move at fairly logical switching points for me (just before high school, for example, when all of my friends were heading to different schools anyway). My two-years-younger sister got stuck moving at some lousy points.


message 23: by Auntie (new)

Auntie Raye-Raye (fabulousraye) I live in the same house I grew up in. I like it. My neighborhood is quiet, and my neighbors are very helpful.


message 24: by Kate (new)

Kate (kateharper) | 206 comments I lived in Pittsburgh until I was 8 when we move to Florida. I went from there to California then to Nevada and I've finally settled in the Seattle area.

We moved a lot when I was in Florida and after 4th grade, I never went to the same school two years in a row. Some of that was natural (e.g., moving from Junior High to High School) but some of it was also because my dad was in construction and we moved to where the work was. As a result of that, I was in the Cape Canaveral/Kennedy area for the early part of the space program and in Orlando when Disney World was built. The families of the construction workers for Disney World got to go in before the park opened so they could have a realistic run through with the employees before opening day. It was great: no lines.


message 25: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24360 comments Mod
When I meet people who have lived in the same place all their lives, I feel alarmed. I think it's important to experience at least a little bit of the world, or the U.S. at least.


message 26: by Dr. Detroit (last edited Nov 10, 2010 06:13AM) (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6031 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "When I meet people who have lived in the same place all their lives, I feel alarmed. I think it's important to experience at least a little bit of the world, or the U.S. at least."


Respectfully disagree. I've lived in Michigan all of my life. If you find something that works and you love, stick with it. If that's a rut, then build a moat around me, turn out the lights, and lock the doors.


message 27: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments I like when people use the word "alarmed." It gives me a hilarious mental image of their face.


message 28: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments I really have no problem with living in or near the same place your whole life, you may find everything you desire right there. But I do agree that given the opportunities that it is good to get out and see the world, and hopefully they are able to use vacations to do so.


message 29: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) I get back to my home area once every few years. It's comforting to do that. What never fails to strike me, though, is how much taller all of the trees seem. That's probably a function of living in the west where teees are generally smaller that in the northeast.

I am very pleased with my choice to move away. I feel much more well-rounded (no smart remarks!) having lived in different places.


message 30: by Carol (new)

Carol | 1679 comments I agree with Clark (I was going to type I'm with Clark...) I live one road away from where I lived age 5-18. It's a small city @ 20,000, and I live in the country. I've lived 50 miles away and stayed with my sister in Alabama when my marriage ended.

It's simple to expand your cultural horizons by travel, reading, and cool interactions like this group.


message 31: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments I agree, that by interacting on sites like this, you really do pick up on some of the differences in cultures. Not to the extent of having lived there, but you are given an awareness that a difference exists.


message 32: by Jaimie (last edited Nov 10, 2010 11:28AM) (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments You know what. I actually don't even consider my hometown my hometown anymore. The reason being is I was born in Philadelphia and lived there until I was 15 when I moved out to San Diego. That will be 19 years next month. So as I've lived more years in San Diego than in Philadelphia I actually consider Philadelphia my birthplace and San Diego my hometown. I am planning to go back there this Christmas to visit with family and friends but, as I've reconnected with them all recently I really feel like a completely different person. I don't know if that helps the TCK debate either way but I wanted to share that perspective.


message 33: by Jan (new)

Jan | 241 comments We moved to the left coast shortly after we got married. It was beautiful and all, but due to circumstances, we came back to New England, never having the desire to leave again.


message 34: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments Koeeoaddi wrote: "*high fives Jaimie*

I was a Philly girl until age 19 and have lived away now for over 30 years. After so long in the West (Wyoming, Washington, Arizona, Oregon) I can barely remember deciduous tre..."


YEAH! My sista! I am going to eat every cheesesteak and pretzel in the city when/if I get there in December!

Bun, the more I think about it I think it does have to do with the TCK thing. When I first came here and went to school, I felt so completely alien. My style of dress, the way I spoke, even slang that was being used at the time. So as not to stand out so badly, I assimilated to all of it as fast as possible. I even had surfer t-shirts and I can't swim.

It's hard for me to articulate it. Maybe Koeeoaddi can help me out. There is a big different in people in the eastern states as opposed to the western states. It'll be interesting to see how I react when I go back for the first time in 19 years.


message 35: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11694 comments I don't have a hometown.

We lived in Portland until I was four, then Northern California, then Michigan, then Southern California, then Northern California, then the Seattle area, then Utah.

If I had to pick, I'd say Portland. Even though I have no childhood memories there, I still prefer to self-identify as an Oregonian.


message 36: by Ken (last edited Nov 10, 2010 03:25PM) (new)

Ken (playjerist) | 721 comments I’m thousands of miles from my place of birth. One has no control over where one is born or raised, and if that place, or those places suit one as an adult that’s a fortunate accident. Otherwise, set out for the place or places that suit your sensibilities and your ambitions or even your whims as far as I’m concerned. I feel like I’ve benefitted from the mix of places I’ve lived, and also had a lot of fun and adventure, some of it legal, which was more of a priority for me than perhaps for some.

I can’t imagine having to see people you went to high school on a regular basis for the rest of your natural born life. I’d rather be skinned alive by the Mongolian army.


message 37: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) I was born in the town of Washington, NH. I now live in the same house I lived in when I went to high school, in SoCal. I travel to Seattle to see one kid, San Diego to see another, and one is local. My backyard is my favorite place in the world, I am happily in a rut.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I've lived in these places, when I was this many years old:

Fort Shafter, HI 0-2
Milwaukee, WI 2-3
Oakland, CA 4-5
Brooklyn, NY 5-6
Schofield Barracks, HI 6-8
Sierra Army Depot, CA 8-11
Bellevue, WA 11
Kirkland, WA 12-18
Salem, OR 18-22 (and Paris, France, for a semester when I was 19)
Kirkland, WA 22-24
Corpus Christi, TX 24-28
Austin, TX 28-32
Olympia, WA 32-44

I'm not quite in Bun's category of TPK, but close. I've traveled through Europe, honeymooned in Costa Rica, been to Canada, Mexico and Argentina, and I really would love to go to Australia and Japan someday.


message 39: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) We've had this conversation before.


message 40: by Lobstergirl, el principe (last edited Nov 10, 2010 05:33PM) (new)

Lobstergirl | 24360 comments Mod
Larry, we'll keeping doing this until you get the right answer. Focus.


message 41: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Got it. Proceed.


message 42: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments BunWat wrote: "I understand what you mean Jaime, I have lived on both coasts, and in the midwest and in the west. I'm not saying there aren't significant regional differences. There are. I'm just saying, take ..."

I see what you mean and I get it. My experience is like that only to a small extent. Technically, same culture, same language, etc., but still a bit of a "culture shock."


message 43: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11694 comments Try ultra-liberal Seattle to ultra-conservative Southern Utah.

YOIKS!


message 44: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments BunWat wrote: "I definitely agree that east/west can be a culture shock. As can north/south.

In a way its weirder to move from one region to another, because when you move from Holland to Japan, or New Jers..."


Exactly! It's the shift you don't expect that hits you hard. I don't think that I'll ever be able to live on the east coast again. For one, there's the snow but I just won't feel like I fit in.


message 45: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments BunWat wrote: "There's something different about being a TCK though. Because - well I can't really explain it. Its like you let go of the idea that fitting in is even a goal, really. You like places or you don'..."

Oh I see! I get that because I don't have that kind of connection to a place either. I certainly don't have it for Philadelphia and I don't have it here because I didn't grow up here. It's a mindset where you are a part of the area you live in.


message 46: by Kailey (new)

Kailey (lukutuokka) I live all the way across the country from where I grew up.


message 47: by Jan (new)

Jan | 241 comments >>I'll take New England, thank you.<<

There's no place like (a New England) home.


message 48: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments After 24 yrs away, I live about 14 miles from my childhood home...I lived in Manchester,NH for 21 yrs.then spent 7 yrs away. moved back for 9 yrs.then moved away for those 24 yrs mentioned above. but I'm not too far away now and hopefully, will not move again.


message 49: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments well, I hope I do not have to move again. I've lived in 10 different cities in 5 different states and that does not even count the number of times I've moved from one address to the other in the same city. and every time I seemed to lose more books.


message 50: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments If only there were book lojacks! :-)


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