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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Since I had to look up where this country was; I certainly thought that I could not be alone; so I thought Namibia needed its own thread.

Regarding Namibia

Namibia, officially the Republic of Namibia (Afrikaans: Republiek van Namibië, German: Republik Namibia), is a country in southern Africa whose western border is the Atlantic Ocean.

It shares land borders with Angola and Zambia to the north, Botswana to the east and South Africa to the south and east. It gained independence from South Africa on 21 March 1990 following the Namibian War of Independence.

Its capital and largest city is Windhoek. Namibia is a member state of the United Nations (UN), the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), and the Commonwealth of Nations.

The dry lands of Namibia were inhabited since early times by Bushmen, Damara, and Namaqua, and since about the 14th century AD by immigrating Bantu who came with the Bantu expansion. It became a German Imperial protectorate in 1884 and remained a German colony until the end of World War I.

In 1920, the League of Nations mandated the country to South Africa, which imposed its laws and from 1948, its apartheid policy.

In 1966, uprisings and demands by African leaders led the United Nations to assume direct responsibility over the territory. It recognized the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) as the official representative of the Namibian people in 1973.

Namibia, however, remained under South African administration during this time. Following internal violence, South Africa installed an interim administration in Namibia in 1985. With the exception of Walvis Bay — a city that remained under South African control until 1994 — Namibia obtained full independence from South Africa in 1990.

Namibia has a population of 2.1 million people and a stable multiparty parliamentary democracy. Agriculture, herding, tourism and mining of precious stones and metals form the backbone of Namibia's economy.

It is the second least densely populated country in the world, after Mongolia. Approximately half the population live below the international poverty line, and the nation has suffered heavily from the effects of HIV/AIDS, with 15% of the adult population infected with HIV in 2007.


Source: Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Namibia

Location of Namibia:



Capital

Windhoek

Its Government:

Government
Republic

- President
Hifikepunye Pohamba

- Prime Minister
Nahas Angula

- Chairperson of the National Council
Asser Kuveri Kapere

- Speaker of the National Assembly
Theo-Ben Gurirab

- Chief Justice
Peter Shivute


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 05, 2010 10:24PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Parliament of Namibia:

The Parliament of Namibia consists of two chambers:

The National Council (Upper Chamber)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National...

The National Assembly (Lower Chamber)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National...

Source: Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliame...


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Independence from South Africa
- Date 21 March 1990

It gained independence from South Africa on 21 March 1990 following the Namibian War of Independence. Its capital and largest city is Windhoek. Namibia is a member state of the United Nations (UN), the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), and the Commonwealth of Nations.


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 05, 2010 10:28PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
It became a German Imperial protectorate in 1884 and remained a German colony until the end of World War I. In 1920, the League of Nations mandated the country to South Africa, which imposed its laws and from 1948, its apartheid policy.


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Its Flag:




message 6: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Here is a recent book that covers Germany's involvement in South-West Africa, modern Namibia.


The Kaiser's Holocaust Germany's Forgotten Genocide and the Colonial Roots of Nazism by David Olusoga by David Olusoga
Publishers blurb
On 12 May 1883, the German flag was raised on the coast of South-West Africa, modern Namibia – the beginnings of Germany’s African Empire. As colonial forces moved in , their ruthless punitive raids became an open war of extermination. Thousands of the indigenous people were killed or driven out into the desert to die. By 1905, the survivors were interned in concentration camps, and systematically starved and worked to death. Years later, the people and ideas that drove the ethnic cleansing of German South West Africa would influence the formation of the Nazi party. The Kaiser’s Holocaust uncovers extraordinary links between the two regimes: their ideologies, personnel, even symbols and uniform. The Herero and Nama genocide was deliberately concealed for almost a century. Today, as the graves of the victims are uncovered, its re-emergence challenges the belief that Nazism was an aberration in European history. The Kaiser’s Holocaust passionately narrates this harrowing story and explores one of the defining episodes of the twentieth century from a new angle. Moving, powerful and unforgettable, it is a story that needs to be told.

Reviews:
"Besides being a rivetingly written, chilling African tragedy, this is a book that makes us see the roots of the Holocaust in a different way. It is amazing that previous writers have paid so little attention to this history, and appalling that some of the Allied nations joined the Germans in trying to cover it up." - Adam Hochschild, (author of King Leopold's Ghost)

"A chilling work that lifts the veil on a forgotten genocide, Imperial Germany's slaughter of modern Namibia's early peoples. This is history writing at its most compelling: forensic analysis, authoritative sourcing, courageous conclusions. In any reckoning of the colonial age, The Kaiser's Holocaust must be read." - Tim Butcher, (author of Blood River)


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Thanks Aussie Rick.


message 8: by Jill (last edited May 21, 2012 08:25AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Namibia was once a part of the German colonies in Africa and although we think of WWI in conjunction with the European continent, fighting also took place in Africa. This book, which is so well written describes the battles and the fate of the country when the Armistice was declared:

The Great War in Africa

The Great War in Africa 1914-1918 by Byron Farwell by Byron Farwell

Synopsis

When we think of WWI, we usually only visualize the grinding trench warfare of the European theater and forget that there was fighting taking place on other continents. This book, by the great historian of the British military experience, Byron Farwell, takes us to the colonial empires in Africa where a different kind of war was fought.
Germany had four colonies in Africa, the largest being German East Africa which was bordered on all sides by colonies of the Allied countries. The British led the charge, with Portugal and Belgium providing more harm than help. With small rag-tag divisions made up of various nationalities and races and less than adept leadership, they bungled their way into a war like no other.......bush fighting, spears, bee attacks, unbelievable heat, pestilence, and a German commander, Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, who outsmarted them at every turn. The fighting was done in skirmishes as opposed to large battles and more men died of tropical disease than were killed by the enemy. This was not one of the British army's finest hours. It was basically a stalemate but the Armistice put an end to all that and the German colonies were divided among the Allied countries.
This is a book that reads like exciting fiction and is highly recommended.


message 9: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Looks fairly comprehensive:

A History of Namibia: From the Beginning to 1990
A History of Namibia From the Beginning to 1990 by Marion Wallace by Marion Wallace
Synopsis
Namibia gained its independence in 1990 after decades of struggle against South African rule. Before its battles with South Africa, the country spent years within the grip of German colonialism. In this book, the first general history of Namibia to be published in more than two decades, a celebrated historian and a renowned archaeologist provide fresh perspective on these events, as well as a detailed account of the country's precolonial period.

The volume begins with an absorbing history of Namibia from earliest times to the arrival of German colonialism in the nineteenth century. Drawing on sources in English and German, the authors explore trajectories of migration, production, and power in the precolonial period, changes triggered by European expansion, and the dynamics of formal colonialism. They relate the full experience of German rule, including the genocide of 1904-1908, the wars of central and southern Namibia, and the fate of defeated Africans who were imprisoned in concentration camps. Final chapters discuss African nationalism, apartheid, and war between 1946 and 1990, and the development of Namibia in the two decades since independence. An invaluable introduction and resource, this volume reasserts Namibia's crucial role in the history of southern Africa and, with its rich insight and extensive bibliography, furthers responsible research on the country and the continent.


message 10: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Another book to add to the list:

A History Of Resistance In Namibia
A History Of Resistance In Namibia by Peter H. Katjavivi by Peter H. Katjavivi
Synopsis
Documents resistance to the German conquest by the Herero and Nama peoples; the South African take-over under the League of Nations mandate; land, labour and community resistance from 1920-1960; the emergence of Nationalist organisations; appeals to the UN and the ICJ; the launching of SWAPO's armed struggle, and nationalist responses to South Afrca's Bantustan policy. Published in association with the OAU and UNESCO.


message 11: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) An absolutely fascinating look at those white colonials who stayed behind once independence was granted. Although the book also covers some other countries, Namibia is featured and is worth adding to this thread. It is a real eye-opening narrative and shows what goes around, comes around.

Lost White Tribes

Lost White Tribes The End of Privilege and the Last Colonials in Sri Lanka, Jamaica, Brazil, Haiti, Namibia, and Guadeloupe by Riccardo Orizio by Riccardo Orizio (no photo)

Synopsis

Over 300 hundred years ago, the first European colonists landed in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean to found permanent outposts of the great empires. This epic migration continued until after World War II, when some of these tropical colonies became independent black nations and the white colonials were forced -- or chose -- to return to the mother country. Among the descendants of the colonizing powers, however, were some who had become outcasts in the poorest strata of society and, unable to afford the long journey home, were left behind, ignored by both the former oppressed indigenous population and the modern privileged white immigrants. At the dawn of the twenty-first century these lost white tribes still hold out, tucked away in remote valleys and hills or in the midst of burgeoning metropolises, living in poverty while tending the myths of their colonial ancestors. Forced to marry within their own group if they hope to retain their fair-skinned "purity," they are torn between the memory of past privilege and the extraordinary pressure to integrate. All are decreasing in number; some are on the verge of extinction and fighting to survive in countries that ostracize them because of the color of their skin and the traditions they represent. Though resident for generations, these people are permanently out of place, an awkward and embarrassing reminder of things past in newly redefined countries that are eager to forget both them and their historical homelands.


message 12: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) A collection of stories from the people known as Bantu who occupy the country of Namibia.

Myths and Legends of the Bantu

Myths and Legends of the Bantu by Alice Werner by Alice Werner(no photo)

Synopsis

IN the 19th C. BANTU was the generally accepted name for those natives of South Africa (the great majority) who are neither Hottentots nor Bushmen-that is to say, mainly, the Zulus, Xosas, Basuto, and Bechuana -to whom may be added the Thongas (Shangaans) of the Delagoa Bay region and the people of (then Southern Rhodesia, now) Zimbabwe. Southern Africa consists of 13 sovereign states and covers an area of approximately 9,276 million kilometres . By comparison the USA is 9,826 million kilometres . Abantu is the Zulu word for 'the people' (in Sesuto batho, and in Herero ovandu) which was adopted by Bleek, at the suggestion of Sir George Grey, as the name for the great family of languages now known to cover practically the whole southern half of Africa. But to speak of a 'Bantu race' is misleading. The Bantu-speaking peoples vary greatly in physical stature: some of them hardly differ from some of the 'Sudanic'-speaking Negroes of West Africa, while others show a type which has been accounted for by a probable 'Hamitic' invasion from the north. It is needless to say that they come with a plethora of myths and legends. Some adapted and modified from others and some entirely home-grown. Within these 438 pages you will find 20 chapters filled with almost 200 stories selected from across Southern Africa.


message 13: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) A look at the socio-economic status of Namibia since independence in 1990.

Re-Examining Liberation in Namibia

Re-Examining Liberation in Namibia by Henning Melber by Henning Melber (no photo)

Synopsis:

From 1960, SWAPO of Namibia led the organised and later armed struggle for independence. In late 1989, the liberation movement was finally elected to power under United Nations supervision as the legitimate government. When the Republic of Namibia was proclaimed on 21 March 1990, the long and bitter struggle for sovereignty came to an end. This volume takes stock of emerging trends in the country's political culture since independence. The contributions, mainly by authors from Namibia and Southern Africa who supported the anti-colonial movements, critically explore the achievements and shortcomings that have been part of liberation in Namibia


message 14: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) A noted anthropologist who lived among the bush people tells their story.

The Old Way: A Story of the First People

The Old Way A Story of the First People by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

Synopsis

One of our most influential anthropologists reevaluates her long and illustrious career by returning to her roots--and the roots of life as we know it.
When Elizabeth Marshall Thomas first arrived in Africa to live among the Kalahari San, or bushmen, it was 1950, she was nineteen years old, and these last surviving hunter-gatherers were living as humans had lived for 15,000 centuries.
Back then, this was uncharted territory and little was known about our human origins. Today, our beginnings are better understood. And after a lifetime of interest in the bushmen, Thomas has come to see that their lifestyle reveals great, hidden truths about human evolution.
Thomas has a rare gift for giving voice to the voices we don't usually listen to, and helps us see the path that we have taken in our human journey. In The Old Way, she shows how the skills and customs of the hunter-gatherer share much in common with the survival tactics of our animal predecessors. And since it is "knowledge, not objects, that endure" over time, Thomas vividly brings us to see how linked we are to our origins in the animal kingdom.

The history of mankind that most of us know is only the tip of the iceberg, a brief stint compared to fifteen thousand centuries of life as roving clans that seldom settled down adapted every day to changes in environment and food supply, and lived for the most part like the animal ancestors from which they evolved. Those origins are not so easily abandoned, Thomas suggests, and our wired, documented, and market-driven society has plenty to learn from the Bushmen of the Kalahari about human evolution. Thomas helps us see the path that we have taken in our human journey. In The Old Way, she shows how the skills and customs of the hunter-gatherer share much in common with the survival tactics of our animal predecessors. And since it is "knowledge, not objects, that endure" over time, Thomas brings us to see how linked we are to our origins in the animal kingdom.


message 15: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4374 comments Mod
The Namibian War of Independence, 1966-1989: Diplomatic, Economic and Military Campaigns

The Namibian War of Independence, 1966-1989 Diplomatic, Economic and Military Campaigns by Richard Dale by Richard Dale (no photo)

Synopsis:

The decolonization of Namibia was delayed from 1966 to 1989--the period of the war of independence--pitting the Namibian nationalists against the South African minority-ruled regime. This book describes the diplomatic, economic and military campaigns of the Namibian and South African belligerents and draws a comparison with several other decolonization wars. Using data from parliamentary debates, the aftermath of the Namibian war is examined in terms of the diplomatic, economic and military changes in the newly independent nation. The book focuses on providing a basis for further investigation of the decolonization process, particularly within the context of the African, comparative and international subfields of political science.


message 16: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Thank you Jerome.


message 17: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) One man's experience in Namibia on the eve of independence.

Sands of Silence: One Safari In Namibia

Sands Of Silence On Safari In Namibia by Peter Hathaway Capstick by Peter Hathaway Capstick Peter Hathaway Capstick

Synopsis:

From the successor to Ruark and Hemingway comes the most lavishly illustrated, historically important safari ever captured in print.

Peter Hathaway Capstick journeyed on safari through Namibia in the African spring of 1989. This was a nation on the eve on independence, a land scorched by sun, by years of bitter war. In these perilous circumstances, Peter Capstick commences what is surely the most thrilling safari of his stories career. He takes the reader to the stark landscape that makes up the Bushmen's tribal territories. There, facing all kinds of risks, members of the chase pursue their quarry in a land of legend and myth. the result is an exciting big-game adventure whose underlying themes relate directly to the international headlines of today.

In this first person adventure, Capstick spins riveting tales from his travels and reports on the Bushmen's culture, their political persecution, and the Stone Age life of Africa's original hunter-gatherers. In addition, the author explains the economic benefits of the sportsman's presence, and how ethical hunting is a tool for game protection and management on the continent.

Not since Peter Capstick's Africa has the author taken the reader along on safari. In this superbly illustrated book, Capstick returns to the veld with an ace video cameraman and leading African wildlife photographer Dr. M. Philip Kahl. one hundred of Dr. Kahl's striking color photos capture perfectly life and death in the "land of thirst."


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Excellent


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Geological Wonders of Namibia

Geological Wonders of Namibia by Michel Detay by Michel Detay (no photo)

Synopsis:

This stunning depiction of geology in Namibia combines searingly beautiful photography with clear explanations of how the varied landscapes formed. Arranged chronologically (starting 13.8 billion years ago), the chapters each deal with a particular event or process that has resulted in the formation under discussion. These include the early beginnings of the Earth, meteorites, canyons and limestone caves, vast desert landscapes, moonscapes and bizarrely-shaped rocks, and Namibia’s astonishing underwater lakes and reservoirs. Picture-driven, with accessible text, this book features all the highlights of Namibian landscapes and landforms. A treat for travellers real and virtual – those on the road as well as those in armchairs.


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