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Archive > It all started on a little page #46 in whatever book you choose...

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message 1: by Lynne (new)

Lynne (lmsindel) Here is the place to leave a quote from your biography selection.


Lyn (Readinghearts) (lsmeadows) | 2834 comments Mod
Good one. Mine would have been "My life really started on page 46."


message 3: by Lynne (new)

Lynne (lmsindel) Lyn M wrote: "Good one. Mine would have been "My life really started on page 46.""

Well then it is a good thing you are responsible for next months quote post.


Lyn (Readinghearts) (lsmeadows) | 2834 comments Mod
No one is posting their quotes, but I will be first.

From Samurai William: The Englishman Who Opened Japan by Giles Milton:

"[William] Adams trained as a pilot and shipwright under the famous Nicholas Diggins. To have had such a tutor was a stroke of fortune, for Diggins was a skilled shipwright who built many of the vessels used by London's gentlemen adventurers. He taught Adams how to construct the small, fast, caravel-built ships that had become popular with English captains and also gave him instruction on how to shape a ship's frame and clad it with plankings. These lessons would one day save his life. "


message 5: by Luann (new)

Luann (azbookgal) | 1006 comments I haven't finished my book yet! But I suppose I could still leave a quote from page 46:

From An Autobiography by Agatha Christie:

A good many people came to our house during my young days, and it seems a pity that I personally do not remember any of them! All I recall about Henry James is my mother complaining that he always wanted a lump of sugar broken in two for his tea--that it really was affectation, as a small knob would do quite as well. Rudyard Kipling came, and again my only memory is a discussion between my mother and a friend as to why he had ever married Mrs. Kipling. My mother's friend ended by saying, "I know the reason. They are the perfect complement to each other." Taking the word to be "compliment" I thought it a very obscure remark, but as Nursie explained one day that to ask you to marry him was the highest compliment a gentleman could pay a lady, I began to see her point.


message 6: by Cam (new)

Cam A quote leading from page 45 but closing on page 46 of
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly By Jean-Dominique Bauby.

The origin of my addiction to sausage goes back forty years. Although still at the age for sweets, I already prefered delicatessen meats, & my maternal grandfather's nurse noticed that whenever I visited the gloomy apartment on the Boulevard Raspail I would ask her in a beguiling lisp for sausage. Skilled in indulging the desires of children & the elderly, she eventually pulled off a double coup by giving me a sausage & marrying my grandfather just before he died. My joy at receiving such a gift was direct proportion to the annoyance these unexpected nuptuals caused my family. I have only the vaguest picture of my grandfather: supine & stern-faced in the gloom, resembling Victor Hugo's portrait on the five-hundred-franc notes in use at that time. I have a much clearer memory of the sausage lying incongruously among my Dinky toys & children's books.
I fear I will never eat a better sausage.


message 7: by Luann (new)

Luann (azbookgal) | 1006 comments There isn't a good quote on page 46 of My Life in Dog Years by Gary Paulsen, but thought I would post the one I included in my review:

I have always had dogs and will have dogs until I die. I have rescued dozens of dogs from pounds, always have five or six of them around me, and cannot imagine living without dogs. They are wonderful and, I think, mandatory for decent human life.


message 8: by Lynne (new)

Lynne (lmsindel) Luann wrote: "There isn't a good quote on page 46 of My Life in Dog Years by Gary Paulsen, but thought I would post the one I included in my review:

I have always had dogs and will hav..."


I agree!!!!!!!!!


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