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Feeling Nostalgic? The archives > How did you find other readers when you were a kid?>...aaand back to audio books (again)

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message 1: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Last night my twelve year old went to a Mockingjay release party from 9:30 to midnight. He was one of the youngest kids there, I think, but the party was important for a couple reasons and he said he had a great time. They did trivia from the first couple books, etc., then got the books at midnight.

Why was this important, you ask? Well, for example, my son is on the football team, practices five days a week, and has lots of football friends. But he doesn't get the message from the culture around him much that guys are supposed to read and I know some of his friends don't read at all. So when he connects at the library with 25 local kids who like to read he hopefully forms relationships with other readers his age.

Which leads me to the question...how did you find other readers when you were a kid, if you did at all? I remember teaching middle school in Chicago and seeing the reading kids sort of find each other by watching each other read, trading books, etc. Did that happen with you? Comments?


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

I never did really find other readers when I was younger. My mom was a school librarian, so I got to see a lot of books which kept me in stock.


message 3: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments i never found other readers and never really sought them out. i LOVED the deal where you got the form and ordered books for like .69 each. mom would never give me money for candy or toys but she would always give me a few bucks for books at the book fair or on book order day. with the crowd i ran around with my whole childhood i sorta kept the book lovin' on the DL


message 4: by Barb (new)

Barb I wasn't really a reader when I was a kid, so I never had that issue.
The party your son went to sounds like a great idea ... for all the reasons you stated.


message 5: by Brittomart (last edited Aug 24, 2010 11:17AM) (new)

Brittomart I never really "found" other readers. I have only like, one other friend who reads, and we're pretty close, but he's it. The other readers I found were kinda...snobbish.


message 6: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Dinnae happen.


Stacia (the 2010 club) (stacia_r) I can't say that I ever hung out with a reading type crowd.

The closest we ever got to reading being somewhat cool was when the Scholastic order forms would come in at school and everyone in the class would pick out a couple of books to order. Then, on the day of the book delivery, we'd all get excited to take our books out of the packs that they came in and we'd read them in class.

My mom was a huge reader, and because of that she made it a priority to take me to the bookstore and library just about every week (sometimes twice a week). I was only allowed limited television and video games, so in the pre-telephone years, if I was alone, it was pretty much a given that I'd be reading. If I was with friends, we were usually outside roaming the neighborhood and getting into trouble.


message 8: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24076 comments Mod
We were a reading family, me especially. My mother would take me to the library and I'd come home with a stack of books two feet high and read through them without stopping. I don't remember ever reading with my friends, though. It was pretty much a solitary habit. I think I read a lot more than they did. I don't even remember seeing other kids at the public library. But most kids at school loved the Scholastic thing too. Isn't it funny the way so many people have that as a common experience? I'm sure I still have some of those Scholastic books somewhere.


message 9: by janine (new)

janine | 7715 comments i come from a reading family too. my parents read every day and my sisters read too. my brother is the only one who never asks for books on his birthday. i don't think i had any real reading friends before i was 14 or 15.


message 10: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments my mother was a reader. in all the dysfunction and mess of our family i am sure books took her away the same way they did me. i remember her reading poems to us. Kentucky Belle was one of my fond memories. she also read James Whitcomb Riley to us. there were always lots of books everywhere. my daughter now is the one who got this passed from me


message 11: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) I agree, reading was a great escape for me a well. I remember staying up all night reading both The Exorcist and The Omen. I loved those creepy terrifying novels maybe because they made my life look a little less so. Now, I am hooked on audio books because I can listen at work or while I am doing yard/house work. I still read, it is just a time luxury in a busy life.


message 12: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24076 comments Mod
I've only listened to one audio book, Hound of the Baskervilles. I find it easier to read a book; when I'm listening, I tend to get distracted and have to rewind.


message 13: by Stacia (the 2010 club) (last edited Aug 25, 2010 01:54PM) (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (stacia_r) If I still commuted to work, audio books would seem like a great idea for the car. They don't make much sense for me at home. Walking around with an ipod isn't really my thing, and I move around too much in the house to listen to one in a single room.


message 14: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments Most of my reading was suggested by my friends' older brothers and sisters who were in high school and junior high. Also, my parents and family would give me their childhood favorites (usually classics) as gifts for Christmas and my birthday.

I love audio books. I listen to them in the car on the way to work, from work, while running errands, and will often sit in the car to "finish a chapter." I find them so much more appealing than radio. I enjoy listening to music in the car too, but when I'm particularly stressed or upset about something, I don't want to listen to music because I don't want the music to be associated with that period in my life. Is that weird? I can deal with the audio books being associated with them because they're complete departure/escapism from whatever's weighing on my mind.


Stacia (the 2010 club) (stacia_r) The ever changing thread titles, custom fit to the current thread derail, are quite amusing.


message 16: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24076 comments Mod
Interesting. I can sometimes remember what I was reading when something memorable happened in my life. When one boyfriend dumped me, I was reading "Debating P.C." by Paul Berman. Another boyfriend I associate with "A Passage to India." That boyfriend was a big time-suck; I only read 3 books the year I dated him.


message 17: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments audio books suck


message 18: by Barb (new)

Barb I've never actually attempted to listen to an audio book. I don't know how well I'd be able to focus; I tend to half listen to things and they just become back ground noise.


message 19: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) I've done it while driving a long distance. I can't imagine another setting in which I could do it.


message 20: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments Kevin "El Liso Grande" wrote: "audio books suck"

No, they don't.


message 21: by ms.petra (last edited Aug 25, 2010 08:37PM) (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) I think the narrator can make or break a book. A great first listen would be the Harry Potter series narrated by Jim Dale. He is amazing!
also:
Website: www.georgeguidall.com

Average Narrator Rating: (See Reviews Below.)
Here are some of the things others have said about George Guidall and the books narrated by George Guidall :
AudioFile praises the narrator: “Guidall’s strong and assured portrayal of these characters gives us aural snapshots for our memory’s scrapbook.”


message 22: by Heidi (last edited Aug 25, 2010 08:13PM) (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments ms.petra wrote: "I think the narrator can make or break a book. A great first listen would be the Harry Potter series narrated by George Guidall. He is amazing!
Website: www.georgeguidall.com

Average Narrator Rati..."


WHOA! The Harry Potter series is narrated by Jim Dale. I'd bet my left pinky on that. He was The Doc on Pete's Dragon... and he's one of my all-time favorite actors. He's actually the reason I got into the Harry Potter series to begin with. I already knew he was immensely talented. I had NO idea he could do so many dialects, though. He really brought the characters to life.


message 24: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 25, 2010 08:27PM) (new)

ms.petra wrote: "I think the narrator can make or break a book. A great first listen would be the Harry Potter series narrated by George Guidall. He is amazing!
Website: www.georgeguidall.com

Average Narrator Rati..."


I have the Stephen Fry - Harry Potter audio. He is brilliant. We listen to audio books on car trips when we go on holidays.


message 25: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments I saw Jim Dale on Broadway when I was a kid. He played the circus impresario P.T. Barnum in a musical version of Barnum's life. Totally fabulous--but that was probably thirty years ago. How old is Dale now?


message 26: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Thirty years older.


message 27: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments Are you sure about that, Fes?


message 28: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Probably.


message 29: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) Heidi wrote: "ms.petra wrote: "I think the narrator can make or break a book. A great first listen would be the Harry Potter series narrated by George Guidall. He is amazing!
Website: www.georgeguidall.com

Aver..."


thanks Heidi for catching my mistake... I seem to be doing a lot of that lately... too much other stuff going on in my head. :(
Anyway, it has been edited and both are fabulous narrators.


message 30: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments ms.petra wrote: "Heidi wrote: "ms.petra wrote: "I think the narrator can make or break a book. A great first listen would be the Harry Potter series narrated by George Guidall. He is amazing!
Website: www.georgegui..."


It did occur to me that maybe he did an overseas version? I mean, Gail DID mention she has the version with Stephen Frye as the narrator.


message 31: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments I just checked on the worldwide interweb machine, and it says Dale is 75, won a Tony for Barnum in 1980. Also says his real name is James Smith. I guess that would be a pretty nondescript name for a stage actor.


message 32: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments Jonathan wrote: "I saw Jim Dale on Broadway when I was a kid. He played the circus impresario P.T. Barnum in a musical version of Barnum's life. Totally fabulous--but that was probably thirty years ago. How old is ..."


I love him.


message 33: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) A lot of the narrators are former Broadway actors and they bring the stories to life. I also like memoirs read by the author. Sidney Poitier has a voice like velvet!


message 34: by Heidi (last edited Aug 26, 2010 06:57AM) (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments Ohhh, I LOOVE Philip Pullman's voice. Makes me melty...


He's on my list of favorite narrators.

Also on the list:

Jim Dale
Tim Curry
Kate Burton
Frank Muller
Anna Fields
Paul Rudd


message 35: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments i only want an audio book if paul reubens or tiny tim is narrating it


message 36: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments or maybe the lady from throw momma from the train


message 37: by [deleted user] (new)

I have listened to a couple of audio books that were really well done, and a couple that made me want to stick a pen in my ear.


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