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ABOUT BOOKS AND READING > What are U reading these days? (PART SIX) (2010)

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message 1: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 31, 2009 10:54PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments What are U reading these days? (PART SIX) (2010)
(continued from Part Five)


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 5524 comments I'm reading The Accidental Time Machine by Joe Haldeman thanks to a friend. It's a pretty wild ride.

In between times, I'm reading the first of the Lily Bard novels, Shakespeare's Landlord, by Charlaine Harris, the gal that writes the Sookie Stackhouse (True Blood) books. It's a murder mystery, a lot like her Aurora Teagarden books, but the heroine is more damaged & tougher. Another candy read, but entertaining.


message 3: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jim wrote: "I'm reading The Accidental Time Machine by Joe Haldeman thanks to a friend. It's a pretty wild ride.
In between times, I'm reading ..."


Jim, thanks for jumping into this new part of the general reading thread.

Thanks, too, for the links. Time travel stories and murder mysteries are usually a good bet.
I'm still reading Joy Fielding's murder mystery, _Puppet_, also a candy read, but it's keeping me reading and that's what's important for me at this point.


message 4: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments It's been a rare reading day for me! I finished World Without End, and started and finished Sarah's Key. I'm going to start The Xibalba Murders An Archeological Mystery tonight.

Oh! I'm also listening to The Titan's Curse.


message 5: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (Katherine42) | 199 comments Jenni wrote: "It's been a rare reading day for me! I finished World Without End, and started and finished Sarah's Key. I'm going to start [book:The Xibalba Murders An Archeological M..."
Hi Jenni,
Please let me know how you like "Sarah's Key. Quick read,wasn't it?



message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Jim wrote: "I'm reading The Accidental Time Machine by Joe Haldeman thanks to a friend. It's a pretty wild ride.
[..."


Thanks for mentioning this book Jim, I'd meant to order it quite a while ago, and lost track of it. Just ordered a second hand copy off of Amazon. :)




message 7: by Werner (new)

Werner I can't post my current reading here on Goodreads, because it's an unpublished manuscript with no record in the system. It turns out that our own Jim MacLachlan has a real gift for writing, and he's used it to produce a cycle of four long short stories (how's that for an oxymoron?), linked by a common main character, in the noir crime fiction tradition. He graciously sent me electronic copies of his current drafts; I put the hard copies in a loose-leaf notebook, and I'm reading them like a book. They're very good examples of their type! So Jim, when you're recognized by the literary world as the new Raymond Chandler, don't forget us little people. :-)


message 8: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 01, 2010 06:12PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jenni wrote: "It's been a rare reading day for me! I finished World Without End, and started and finished Sarah's Key. I'm going to start The Xibalba Murders An Archeological Mystery tonight. ..."

Jenni, GR says: "Lyn Hamilton was a Canadian author of archaeological mystery novels."
That sounds like an interesting genre!

Good to see you, Katherine, and Pontalba joining this new thread.


message 9: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Werner wrote: "I can't post my current reading here on Goodreads, because it's an unpublished manuscript with no record in the system. It turns out that our own Jim MacLachlan has a real gift for writing, and he..."

Oh, Werner, you're here in this new thread too! The icing on the cake!

How great to hear about Jim's writing. I must say, I'm not surprised. The guy's such an interesting person!


message 10: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 5524 comments I'm blushing, but thank you. I don't consider myself a writer since no one has bought anything. Trying to get anything published is the hardest part, I think. Werner is a great editor & has caught more errors than I thought possible.

I spent a fair amount of time reading today. I finished both the Lily Bard & the Accidental Time Machine. Both were good, but not great. I'll write reviews shortly.

I received 4 more free ebooks through another place & found out my Sony eReader has corrupted itself again. You'd think the bloody thing was running a Microsoft operating system instead of a Linux one. I'm ready to take a hammer to it. Instead, I'm going to flash it again; format the expansion memory card & upgrade the firmware. Maybe that will do the trick.


message 11: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jim wrote: "I'm blushing, but thank you. ...
... I received 4 more free ebooks through another place & found out my Sony eReader has corrupted itself again. You'd think the bloody thing was running a Microsoft operating system instead of a Linux one. I'm ready to take a hammer to it. Instead, I'm going to flash it again; format the expansion memory card & upgrade the firmware. Maybe that will do the trick."


Good luck with that, Jim.
Are you ready to go back to hard copies? (g)


message 12: by Mary JL (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 458 comments I am reading a mystery in the "Rome" series of Gordianus the Finder. This is "Rubicon", and as the title indicates is set just after Ceasar has crossed the Rubicon river and he and Pompey the Great are in conflict.

It's fairly good.


message 13: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 5524 comments No, I'm not ready to give up on the eReader, Joy. I will figure this out. It's great for reading on, just being a drag in a few ways.


message 14: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments Katherine wrote: "Jenni wrote: "It's been a rare reading day for me! I finished World Without End, and started and finished Sarah's Key. I'm going to start [book:The Xibalba Murders An A..."

It was a quick read! I loved how the story was told. I especially loved Sarah's story. Sad though it was, it was told so beautifully! I have a feeling that this will be one of my top picks of 2010.


message 15: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 02, 2010 01:15PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Mary JL wrote: "I am reading a mystery in the "Rome" series of Gordianus the Finder. This is "Rubicon", and as the title indicates is set just after Ceasar has crossed the Rubicon river and he and Pompey the Great are in conflict."

Mary, you've sparked my curiosity. So I tried to find out more about this "Roma Sub Rosa" series. As you said, you're reading: _Rubicon_ by Steven Saylor.

At Wiki they list the books in the series and explain them as follows (see excerpts below):
(Of course, yours is #8 on the list below.)
====================================================
"Roma Sub Rosa" is a series of mystery novels by Steven Saylor set in ... Ancient Rome.
The detective is known as Gordianus the Finder...
Gordianus interacts with non-fictional citizens including Sulla, Cicero, Marcus Crassus, Catullus, Pompey, Julius Caesar, Quintus Sertorius, and Mark Antony.

"Roma Sub Rosa" means, in Latin, "Rome under the rose". If a matter was "under the rose" it meant that such matter was confidential.

BOOKS IN THE SERIES:
While the books were written in a different order, they are set in the order shown here:
1. Roman Blood (1991)—80 BC
2. The House of the Vestals (1997)—First collection of short stories.
3. A Gladiator Dies Only Once (2005)—Second collection of short stories
4. Arms of Nemesis (1992)—72 BC
5. Catilina's Riddle (1993)—63 BC
6. The Venus Throw (1995)—56 BC
7. A Murder on the Appian Way (1996)—52 BC
8. Rubicon (1999)—49 BC: (Gordianus investigates how a body turned up in his garden as Rome lurches into civil war.)
9. Last Seen in Massilia (2000)—49 BC
10. A Mist of Prophecies (2002)—48 BC
11. The Judgment of Caesar (2004)—48 BC
12. The Triumph of Caesar (2008)—46 BC

The series is noted for its historical authenticity.
See more details about each book at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roma_Sub...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordianu...
====================================================
GR says: "Weaving history, legend, and new archaeological discoveries into a spellbinding narrative, critically acclaimed novelist Steven Saylor gives new life to the drama of the city’s first thousand years."

PS-I majored in history and have never lost my love for it, as you can see. :) Actually, I should read more historical novels like these. -Joy


message 16: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jenni wrote: "... I loved how the story was told. I especially loved Sarah's story. Sad though it was, it was told so beautifully! I have a feeling that this will be one of my top picks of 2010."

Jenni, you've convinced me! :) I've put in a reserve-request for the book at our public library.
Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay _Sarah's Key_ by Tatiana de Rosnay


message 17: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments Joy, I don't think you'll regret it! :) Let me know what you think when you read it!


message 18: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (Katherine42) | 199 comments Jenni wrote: "Joy, I don't think you'll regret it! :) Let me know what you think when you read it!"
DITTO




message 19: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 03, 2010 11:10PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments I finished reading _Puppet_, a light mystery by Joy Fielding.
My review can be found at:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...
I gave it 3 stars out of 5. Good ending but drags in the middle. Protagonist talks to herself too much. One of the GR reviewers calls that an "introspective crapfest". LOL


message 20: by Mary JL (last edited Jan 04, 2010 03:53AM) (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 458 comments Finished "Rubicon" last night--review to follow. Finished up a very thin book of short, early Sf tales by Alan E. Nourse.

Definitely will be in the house today--this wind child is -29 thos morning!!!!


message 21: by Mary JL (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 458 comments Joy: Definitely try the "Rome Sub Rosa" series. If you can read them in order with "Roman Blood" first, they do make a bit more sense. However, thought past events are mentioned in pasing, there are no spoilers, and each can be read alone.


message 22: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments I've finished The Xibalba Murders An Archeological Mystery, and am now reading Obsidian Butterfly, the 9th book in the Anita Blake series. The Xibalba Murders An Archeological Mystery was interesting in that I learned a lot about the Maya, but it was dry and hard to really feel much about the characters.


message 23: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 04, 2010 06:57AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Mary JL wrote: "Finished "Rubicon" last night--review to follow. Finished up a very thin book of short, early Sf tales by Alan E. Nourse.
Definitely will be in the house today--this wind child is -29 thos morn..."


Mary, GF didn't give much info re Alan Nourse. So I went to Wiki. Here's an excerpt:
"Alan Edward Nourse (August 11, 1928–July 19, 1992) was an American science fiction (SF) author and physician. He wrote both juvenile and adult science fiction, as well as nonfiction works about medicine and science. His SF works generally focused on medicine and/or psionics*.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Nourse
* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psionics

Stay warm, Mary!


message 24: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Mary JL wrote: "Joy: Definitely try the "Rome Sub Rosa" series. If you can read them in order with "Roman Blood" first, they do make a bit more sense. However, ... each can be read alone."

Thanks, Mary. I've put _Roman Blood_ on my To-Read list.


message 25: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jenni wrote: "I've finished The Xibalba Murders An Archeological Mystery, and am now reading Obsidian Butterfly, the 9th book in the Anita Blake series. ..."

I see that Obsidian Butterfly is by Laurell K. Hamilton.
GR says: "Laurell K. Hamilton is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of two series that mix mystery, fantasy, magic, horror and romance. Her Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter novels from Berkley Books began with GUILTY PLEASURES (now a hugely successful graphic novel from Marvel - the first sexy paranormal comic ever!) ..."


message 26: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments I picked up two books at the library today:
One is: _Life of Pi_ by Yann Martel
(a selection of our public library's Tues. afternoon group.)

and the other is:

_The Magic Kingdom of Landover: Volume 1_ by Terry Brooks.
(Contains the first three novels of the series):
1. "Magic Kingdom for Sale-Sold!" (recommended by our own group members)
2. "The Black Unicorn"
3. "Wizard at Large"

I've started reading the first few pages of each. ("Pi" and "Kingdom for Sale")
I was caught up in both right away.
Ain't life grand!


message 27: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments P.S. Wiki has a listing of Terry Brooks' writings. It helps to clarify which book came when. See the list at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Br...
Excerpt about the author:
"Terence Dean "Terry" Brooks (born 1944) is an American writer of fantasy fiction. He writes mainly epic fantasy and has also written two movie novelizations. He has written 22 New York Times bestsellers during his writing career, and has over 21 million copies of his books in print. He is one of the biggest-selling living fantasy writers."


message 28: by Werner (new)

Werner Yesterday, I started reading Eclipse, the third volume of the Twilight series. So I'm transitioning from gritty noir realism to vampiric romance. :-)


message 29: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Werner wrote: "Yesterday, I started reading Eclipse, the third volume of the Twilight series. So I'm transitioning from gritty noir realism to vampiric romance. :-)"

Werner, I like those fancy genre-names! :)


message 30: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments Joy, let me know what you think of Life of Pi... it's one of those books I've been considering reading...


message 31: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 06, 2010 07:38AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jenni wrote: "Joy, let me know what you think of Life of Pi... it's one of those books I've been considering reading..."

OK, Jenni. I'll post here when I finish reading Martel's _Life of Pi_. It may be a while because I've gotten caught up in Brook's _Magic Kingdom_. Brooks has a very readable writing style; it scans well... it seems to flow even though it's colloquial. I would even go so far as to say it has a subtle rhythm to it which keeps you reading. Maybe it's my imagination. Even his most mundane sentences seem to fit just right where they are. Graceful is the word which comes to mind. It's difficult to explain "quality" of writing. He seems to establish an intimacy with the reader... like a friend having an interesting conversation.

I intend to intersperse Brooks with Martel, if it works well. I like switching between books for a change of pace.


message 32: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments In Message 26, I said wrote that I had picked up the following book at our public library.
_The Magic Kingdom of Landover: Volume 1_ by Terry Brooks.
(Contains the first three novels of the series):
1. "Magic Kingdom for Sale-Sold!" (recommended by our own group members)
2. "The Black Unicorn"
3. "Wizard at Large"

Actually, I had wanted only the first book, "Magic Kingdom for Sale-Sold!". I didn't expect to get the three books in one.

There's a big disadvantage to this book. First of all, the print is much too small for me to read comfortably. Second of all the book is too heavy for me to hold comfortably. I don't know why they produce books like this!

Rant over. :)


message 33: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jumping in quickly to say I'm enjoying my two current books.

_Magic Kingdom for Sale-Sold!_ has me looking forward to every page. What will this Landover Kingdom be like?

_The Life of Pi_ has me in a state of awe over the obvious intelligence of author Yann Martel. So far he has me spellbound by his wonderful prose and his deep interest in his subject (e.g., zoo animals, among other subjects) and his ability to instill that interest in the reader.

A SLIGHT SPOILER:
Did you know that the protagonist, "Pi", took on that nickname because his real name was an embarrassment? So he told people his name was "Pi", as in the math pi symbol which stands for 3.14...
http://www.gradeamathhelp.com/math-pi...
By using the pi symbol to explain his nickname, he insured that folks would remember his name. Clever boy!

I'll try to duplicate the symbol here: π

Wiki says: Pi represents "the ratio of any circle's circumference to its diameter..."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi
(I used to know more about this.) LOL

Of course, "pi" is also a letter in the Greek alphabet.

Martel explains all this so much better! LOL
He says that the symbol for pi "looks like a shack with a corrugated tin roof" (p.24). How's that for a simile! :)

Anyway... off I go... into my books!


message 34: by Jackie (last edited Jan 08, 2010 08:09AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I agree with Jim on The Accidental Time Machine: good but not great.

I just finished Twistor and here at goodreads it says: Given Cramer's dry, stiff, academic prose and the equally dry, stiff, academic characters, the interesting and dramatic kernel of physics speculation will open only to the most persistent of readers.
My opinion differs: while the characters weren't the kind you fall in love with, they weren't dry or stiff and neither was the writing, for that matter. Cramer's writing is a lot better than some hard sci fi authors I've read. I really wish goodreads didn't write that because I was put off by it and others probably will be too. It was only because I already started when it came to my attention that I continued.
After all, it is hard sci fi; it'll have a technical and scientific theme throughout. I found that part of it interesting but a little long. I would have liked to get to the 'shadow universe' sooner.
I'd recommend it to people who have an interest and understand of physics, even at it's most basic. If you're not interested in science and technology, then definitely pass this one by.

Sword of Avalon came in the mail yesterday (my birthday present) and I'll be starting it today. I can't wait to get to it. I'll have to first scan through Ravens of Avalon first, in case it's relevant to Sword. Even though the Avalon books are set in different eras, they are connected.


message 35: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Jackie wrote: "... Sword of Avalon came in the mail yesterday (my birthday present) and I'll be starting it today. ... Even though the Avalon books are set in different eras, they are connected."

Jackie, thanks for the interesting comments and the links. Too bad GR made that misleading comment about _Twistor_.

As for the "Avalon" series, do you think I'd enjoy them? I'm enjoying the first book of Brook's Landover series and am so happy that you, Werner, and Jim have helped me to find my level in the fantasy genre. I've always wondered if there were adult fairy tales available anywhere. This book is definitely one of them! An easy read, but intelligently written.
Magic Kingdom for Sale--Sold (Magic Kingdom of Landover, #1) by Terry Brooks ~~~ Magic Kingdom for Sale--Sold
My thanks to all of you.


message 36: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I'm thrilled you are enjoying Magic Kingdom.

If you like King Arthur stories then you'd like The Mists of Avalon, the first and best of the Avalon series. It's a re-working of the usual mostly male based King Arthur story, from the point of view of Morgaine and it's so very different than other Arthur novels. Morgaine is usually the villian in Arthurian legend, the sister of Arthur and mother of Mordred but MZB's take on it is all about love.
There's also a movie based on it which I'm sure Netflix must carry. Of course much is left out but it'd give you an idea of what Mists is like.

Another excellent re-working by MZB is The Firebrand. The story of the Trojan War from the perspective of Cassandra, sister of Paris and Hector. If you're familiar with Greeky Mythology, you might remember that Apollo gave her the gift of prophecy but curse her so her prophecies were never to be believed. It's one of my favorite books.

What I like about these two books is that both stories are usually male dominated, the women are minor characters and always told from the mens' point of view so it's refreshing to see it from the womens' POV and not have the story change too much.


message 37: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments I have The Mists of Avalon, but haven't read it yet. Someday! :)

Joy, Werner, and Jim have really gotten me interested in the Terry Brooks books... I'm hoping to start reading them soon.


message 38: by Werner (new)

Werner Just now, I went into the Goodreads record for Twistor, used my librarian privilege to delete two sentences, and set the corrected text as the new default description. Whoever originally entered the book used the Publisher's Weekly review as a description. The problem with that is that Goodreads descriptions are supposed to be just that --factual descriptions and/or summaries-- NOT a subjective review! (It's okay to quote from a review when it has some factual material, as this one does; but the reviewer's assessment should have been omitted.)

Joy, I'm glad to have helped steer you to some reading that you're enjoying (and Jenni, I hope that you'll like those books, too)! That's what Goodreads is all about --readers pointing each other to new books, authors and genres. I think it's exciting!


message 39: by Jackie (last edited Jan 08, 2010 10:17AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Thank you, Werner. I agree that it shouldn't carry review quotes in the main area. Too subjective and tastes vary. There's an area for reviews and opinions. I feel it could unnecessarily put readers off and probably did. I feel that is unfair to the author and to the readers.

I went and read it, and that's the way it should have read, thank you Werner.


message 40: by Jen (last edited Jan 09, 2010 06:23AM) (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments Werner, you are so correct! Before joining Goodreads, I was constantly trying to discover new authors, and it's a challenge to figure out on your own. Now, I have the opposite problem - I have so many books to read, it's insane! :) But, it's a problem I enjoy having. :)


message 41: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 08, 2010 09:50PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments It's great the way Werner adjusted the GR description. Good idea. As Jackie pointed out, there's a difference between a description and an opinion.

Jackie, I'll keep _The Firebrand_ in mind.

As Jenni and Werner said, GR helps us discover new authors we might never have considered before. Not only that, taking part in these conversations spurs me on to keep reading... keeps me interested. Another angle is the fact that, although reading is a solitary activity, GR helps us to feel connected and not too alone in our hobby.

About books, have you ever thought about how books are like the "Tardis", the spacecraft of TV's Dr. Who? Wiki explains that "the interior of a TARDIS is much larger than its exterior". ... the word "TARDIS" has been used to describe anything that seems bigger on the inside than on the outside." So it is with books... when you open a small book, you step into a larger world.

To me that's an interesting analogy. Below is a Wiki link to more about the Tardis:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TARDIS
If it weren't for Jackie telling me about the "Dr. Who" TV series, I never would have been aware of the word. In case you're wondering, TARDIS is an acronym for "Time And Relative Dimension In Space".

A book serves as our personal TARDIS.


message 42: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Time And Relative Dimension In Space

You know I'm a dedicated Whovian, of course I'd know what the acronym stands for.
Are you still watching Doctor Who, Joy?


message 43: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments I knew you'd know, Jackie. But perhaps there are lurkers who are as in the dark about these things as I am!

I watched the first two "Dr. Who" episodes of Season 2. The first episode ("The Christmas Invasion") was good, but I didn't enjoy the second one ("New Earth"). Those weird, sick bodies turned me off. So I haven't watched anymore episodes yet. Is there one you would recommend over the others?
See list of episodes at:
http://www.netflix.com/Movie/Doctor_W...

I've got Season 2 on my Instant Queue for streaming.

Was David Tennant in the Season 3 episodes or thereafter?


message 44: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Yes, he's in Seasons 2, 3 & 4.

Here's an episode guide:
http://www.sylvestermccoy.com/newdoct...

Favored episodes are:
The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances (because we first meet Captain Jack Harkness)
Army of Ghosts/Doomsday
The Shakespeare Code
Human Nature/Family of Blood
Blink
Utopia
The Fires of Pompeii

My best and favorite, I watch these over and over:
Silence in the Library/Forest of the Dead
The Stolen Earth/Journey's End






message 45: by Julie (new)

Julie Lomoe | 2 comments Joy H. (of Glens Falls) wrote: "What are U reading these days? (PART SIX) (2010)
(continued from Part Five)"


I'm just finishing Barbara Kingsolver's new book THE LACUNA. It's very untraditional in structure, and I confess I like her older novel PRODIGAL SUMMER a lot more. The characters and their interrelationships are fascinating.

Joy, thanks for keeping me in the loop for this Goodreads group. Although I've been very active online, I'm still not totally up to speed on how to use Goodreads. I invite folks to visit my blog, Julie Lomoe's Musings Mysterioso, at http://julielomoe.wordpress.com. I've had around 30,000 visitors since May. There you can read first chapters of both my mysteries. I need to brag a little: In November I was honored as Author of the Year by the Albany Public Library. If anyone belongs to a book group, I'd love to set up an appearance with you!




message 46: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments That's quite an achievement, Julie! Congratulations!


message 47: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Julie wrote: "I'm just finishing Barbara Kingsolver's new book THE LACUNA. ...
Joy, thanks for keeping me in the loop for this Goodreads group. Although I've been very active online, I'm still not totally up to speed on how to use Goodreads. I invite folks to visit my blog, Julie Lomoe's Musings Mysterioso, at http://julielomoe.wordpress.com. ..."


Julie! How nice to see you here!

Congrats on being honored as Author of the Year by the Albany Public Library! You deserve it. I enjoyed reading your book, Eldercide.

I've read a couple of books by Kingsolver, but not The Lacuna. Thanks for your comments about it and about her Prodigal Summer: A Novel.

Thanks for the surprise visit here! Keep up the good work.


message 48: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 15581 comments Below is an interesting tidbit from the book I'm currently reading, Thank Heaven: A Memoir by Leslie Caron (2009):

p.204 - [Leslie Caron says:]: "... Paul Magwood (who incidentally was never my husband or even a boyfriend, as IMDb claims -- we never even had a meal together.)..."

I'm wondering why Leslie Caron's people haven't asked IMDb to make corrections. Even Wikipedia makes misleading statements about this.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001989/bio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_C...

Can't believe everything we read. Duh!

Anyway, Leslie Caron's new memoir (she's now 78) is chock full of references to countless show people and celebrities. These people live such active lives, travelling and vacationing everywhere, having dinners with each other. They do so much socializing. I don't know how they can stand the pace. Perhaps the key is that they're rich enough to hire people who take care of all of life's little necessities. I guess I'll never know what that's like.

I remember reading that when the Duke of Windsor had to rush out of England, he wasn't able to have his valet with him. They say his hotel room was a mess with clothes all over the place. He had no idea how to manage without help.


message 49: by Jen (new)

Jen (NekoKitty) | 182 comments I just finished Ella Enchanted, and am now reading The Woman in White. I'm loving it so far!




message 50: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Ella Enchanted sounds good. I read Ever by Gail Carson Levine; I enjoyed it.


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Glens Falls (NY) Online Book Discussion Group

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Books mentioned in this topic

The Accidental Time Machine (other topics)
Shakespeare's Landlord (other topics)
Puppet (other topics)
Sarah's Key (other topics)
World Without End (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Joe Haldeman (other topics)
Charlaine Harris (other topics)
Lyn Hamilton (other topics)
Steven Saylor (other topics)
Tatiana de Rosnay (other topics)
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