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The Orphan Conspiracies: 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy
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FRINGE SCIENCE > Out-there science

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message 1: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments Definition of fringe science on Wikipedia:

There are differing definitions of fringe science. Fringe science may be valid science which is not considered mainstream. Alternatively, it may be a questionable scientific approach to a field of study. In any case, it is an inquiry in an established field of study which departs significantly from the mainstream theory in that field.

Mainstream scientists typically regard fringe ideas as highly speculative or even as actually refuted.

The term "fringe science" covers everything from novel hypotheses which can be tested by means of the scientific method to wild ad hoc hypotheses and New Age mumbo jumbo (mostly the latter). This has resulted in a tendency to dismiss all fringe science as the domain of pseudoscientists, hobbyists, and cranks.

Other terms used for the specific areas of fringe science are pathological science, voodoo science, and cargo cult science. Junk science is a term typically used in the political arena to describe ideas considered to be dubious or fraudulent.

A concept that was once accepted by the mainstream scientific community may become fringe science because of a later evaluation of previous research. For example, focal infection theory, which held that focal infections of the tonsils or teeth are a primary cause of systemic disease, was once considered to be medical fact. It has since been dismissed because of lack of evidence.

Some theories that were once rejected as fringe science, but were eventually accepted as mainstream science, are:
continental drift
the existence of Troy
heliocentrism
Norse colonization of the Americas
the Big Bang theory


message 2: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments Krishna wrote: "I guess advanced ancient civilization theory is also a fringe science and it will be accepted in the future."

The evidence is mounting, Krishna, so you could well be right...


message 3: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) I tend to think the Electric Universe folks have it right. They have a lot of interesting criticisms of gravity-only cosmology that make sense to me. So this, along with the ancient civilization theory are two heresies I embrace.


message 4: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) Do you mean like the law of contagion?

I sometimes wonder if magic(k) is a technology that we've lost the theory for. Perhaps at one time people knew how it worked and could do some interesting stuff.


message 5: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) I hope you guys know what a cargo cult is. My thinking is that magic (and probably religion) are something similar. People are imitating something they either never understood or no longer understand.

I fully admit to believing humans had a level of technology that might rival our own prior to the end of the last ice age. I suspect that some parts of magic and religion are dim memories of those times. Think about how we interact with our smartphones, TV remotes, microwave ovens, whatever. Now imagine the gestures we use to interact with that technology being used out of context in religious rituals. If you didn't know what it was based on, how would you interpret a swiping movement? Maybe mudras were actually hand gestures for working some technological device, for one example.


message 6: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments a good article on the importance of being able to discuss "fringe science" in public platforms such as this group:

Science journalism faces media changes, emerging discoveries -- http://jointreconstudygroup.blogspot....


By Steve Hammons

(A version of this article appears in the April-June 2010 edition of EdgeScience magazine on the website of the Society for Scientific Exploration.)

“Weird science” and “weird science journalism” may reconfigure how science is explored, communicated and understood.

The field of journalism is going through significant changes as print and broadcast media are transformed by electronic media of various kinds.

Science journalism is no exception. Online and e-journalism, including citizen journalism, are changing not only media platforms but also content and focus.

Sometimes, this is perceived as, and generally acknowledged to be, a trend that has some negative aspects. However, parts of these changes are related to more vigorous coverage of topics that science journalists may have been covering inadequately.

Often sticking with safe and conventional science topics, some science journalists might have missed very interesting emerging developments in a range of scientific areas.

EMERGING VIEWS

Certain topics deemed unconventional, anomalous, metaphysical, fringe or even paranormal may, in fact, be very legitimate subjects that science journalists can cover. In the area of emerging discoveries, the public may be ahead of some science journalists in recognizing coming trends.

Where to begin? Interesting discoveries have been made in the fields of human psychology and consciousness, quantum physics and anomalous flying objects, to name a few.

Granted, some of the normal scientific inquiry and scientific journalism coverage over past decades may have been stifled by national security restrictions on these topics. However, the times are a changing and topics that previously were kept under tight security may now be more appropriate for public education and acclimation.

For example, the U.S. defense and intelligence communities’ research and operational activities often referred to as Project STAR GATE were top secret for over two decades.

However, since the mid-1990s, information on the rigorous scientific protocols involved has been declassified and released. These activities made highly significant discoveries about the nature and capabilities of human consciousness.

What has been called “anomalous cognition” might actually be just alternative cognition, complementary cognition or integrative cognition.

This research also led to the innovative concept of “transcendent warfare,” a term coined by a Navy SEAL officer.

Related to these consciousness studies, quantum physics research has uncovered further anomalous indications that seem to point toward revised views of the nature of the Universe. Some researchers now refer to the Universe as a multiverse where various dimensions interact and intersect.

And then there is the topic of what are generally referred to as unidentified flying objects (UFOs). This terminology could now be somewhat obsolete – at least in the cases of some UFOs. According to many respectable and reliable researchers, some UFOs that appear to be solid craft are, in fact, identified.

Some may be U.S. advanced aircraft or spacecraft. Some may be spacecraft of a more exotic origin. Some may be various kinds of phenomena we do not fully understand, but should try to.

OPEN MINDS

When considering these and other unconventional scientific topics, it might be useful for science journalists to abandon the term paranormal and think about aspects of them that may be normal and natural, and therefore worthy of normal journalistic inquiry.

Again, science journalism can possibly be excused over past decades of inattention to certain unconventional topics because of security measures that discouraged legitimate coverage of them.

This excuse may no longer be valid.

If science journalists want to attract readers, viewers and audiences who are interested in relevant and meaningful topics, the integration of conventional and more unconventional journalistic coverage is probably appropriate.

In this sense, integrative journalism may be similar to the concept of integrative medicine or integrative cognition – taking the best of both conventional and emerging science to create more useful perspectives and understanding.

To avoid responsible and thorough coverage of important scientific subjects, including the unconventional, may diminish the perceived relevance of science journalism to millions of Americans and people worldwide.

More important than the fate of establishment science journalists, the human race may be affected by the lack of open-minded inquiry about vitally important emerging phenomena and developments.


message 7: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments Jim wrote: "I hope you guys know what a cargo cult is. My thinking is that magic (and probably religion) are something similar. People are imitating something they either never understood or no longer understand.

I fully admit to believing humans had a level of technology that might rival our own prior to the end of the last ice age. I suspect that some parts of magic and religion are dim memories of those times. Think about how we interact with our smartphones, TV remotes, microwave ovens, whatever. Now imagine the gestures we use to interact with that technology being used out of context in religious rituals. If you didn't know what it was based on, how would you interpret a swiping movement? Maybe mudras were actually hand gestures for working some technological device, for one example. ..."


interesting theories, Jim
I'd never heard of a cargo cult before


message 8: by James, Group Founder (last edited Apr 18, 2015 05:50PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments Another good article on the growing demand for "fringe science":

Journalism’s dilemma: Covering weird science -- http://tvtranscend.blogspot.com.au/20...

By Steve Hammons

Today’s journalists, whether they are working in print media, online platforms or both, face new challenges and opportunities.

More and more people are realizing that some of the most important issues of the day are what could be called unconventional science or unusual emerging developments. A large and growing awareness in the national and international public about leading-edge and forward-leaning research and discovery is changing the views of serious professional journalists.

Editors may often want to avoid these more unconventional topics, preferring the standard coverage of current events that are somewhat more tangible and accepted.

However, some journalists are willing to take a look at unusual topics as well as the psychology of society and the field of journalism in relation to them.

SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTIONS

A May 17, 2010, “editor’s blog” by Christian Science Monitor editor John Yemma was titled “Skeptical about skepticism.” Yemma pointed out that “a true skeptic questions even conventional wisdom.”

“Journalists are professional doubters,” Yemma wrote.

Whether the topic is unusual phenomena of various kinds or more conventional subjects, Yemma points out that excessive negativity can be a form of denial about unusual or uncomfortable possible truths.

He noted, “And that’s where we have a problem in rational discourse today. Writing in a recent issue of the 'Chronicle of Higher Education,' Carlin Romano made a distinction between today’s ‘science warriors’ and the real ‘philosophers of science.’”

“The former take an absolutist approach to science, skewering everything from the Loch Ness monster to conventional religious beliefs as ignorance,” according to Yemma.

“Philosophers of science, however, understand science to be a set of beliefs and knowledge that at times can be turned on its head, a recurring process that Thomas Kuhn described in his book 'The Structure of Scientific Revolutions,'” Yemma said.

CHANGED CLIMATE

In recent decades, anomalous phenomena had not received the more robust scientific and journalistic attention that we see emerging today. So, past journalists can perhaps be excused from their failure to adequately cover these subjects.

In addition, certain security procedures and activities might have actively discouraged journalists who delved into some sensitive topics. These may have been areas related to national security that were best left alone.

But that was then.

Today, the climate seems to have changed and is continually changing. Now, it might be more important to inform the public about unconventional phenomena than to keep those subjects quiet under a blanket of secrecy and ridicule.

It seems that maybe journalism must shift gears and take a vigorous and reasonable look at the fascinating discoveries being made about human consciousness, “weird physics” and similar kinds of topics.

If journalists do not do this, they risk losing more credibility and being left behind by not only the public, but by the facts on the ground in a changing reality.


message 9: by K.P. (new) - added it

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 43 comments i've always been a fan of metaphysics and quantum mechanics. (family thinks im weird but as long as its science they ok lolz). i lurk a lot on this group. dont have much to say cos im catching up on my reading (most of my info is dated... my books end around 1999...) i love these articles and books you guys reference. at least i know what's being discussed and dont feel like the odd one out... the validation makes me happy :3


message 10: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments K.P. wrote: "i've always been a fan of metaphysics and quantum mechanics. (family thinks im weird but as long as its science they ok lolz). i lurk a lot on this group. dont have much to say cos im catching up o..."

Thanks K.P.


message 11: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments Leading biologist Dr. Rupert Sheldrake (author of The Science Delusion: Freeing The Spirit Of Enquiry) gives a lecture in this video on the importance of exploring fringe science: https://www.goodreads.com/videos/8291...


message 12: by Jay (new)

Jay Hawke (jayjordanhawke) | 1 comments Personally, I think true science shouldn't dismiss anything as fringe or new age. When mainstream science asserts that something can be both a particle and a wave, and exists in a superposition of multiple states, while defying the speed of light, then seriously, why is new age so scary by comparison?


message 13: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments I agree Jay. You make good points.


message 14: by Lance, Group Founder (last edited May 08, 2015 04:16AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2825 comments Some of the key discussion threads in this section:

Leading scientist reveals suppressed knowledge https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

How far do Big Brother’s tentacles extend? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

A Splinter Civilization https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Tesla: The Electric Magician https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Free energy ain’t free, baby! https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Top-secret technologies https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

The saga of the electric car https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Directed energy weapons https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Weather modification and HAARP https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

What was the Norway Spiral???? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Telepathic Communication Between Humans and Plants https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Princeton University proves that thought influences physical reality? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

10 (Rumored) Lost Or Suppressed Inventions https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

New Ancient “Mystery Human” Species Identified Shakes Up The Theory Of Evolution https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 - secret technologies? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

The Big Bang Theory - Debunked? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Could the matrix be real? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

U.S. Navy Research Project on Intuition https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Remote Viewing https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Evidence for scientifically advanced Ancient civilizations? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

The science of biocentrism can prove there is an Afterlife, claims Professor Robert Lanza
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

The cost of suppressing technologies https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 15: by John (new)

John Austin Krishna,

No that's not right! Science from an Advanced civilisation would not be "fringe science" but magic!

Recall that Advanced science is indistinguishable from magic!

What makes fringe science on the fringe, is that it is not supported by "accepted science". An advanced civilisation would have its own scientific support structure.


message 16: by James, Group Founder (last edited May 08, 2015 04:53AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 11246 comments John wrote: "No that's not right! Science from an Advanced civilisation would not be "fringe science" but magic!

Recall that Advanced science is indistinguishable from magic!
..."


The above = your opinion, John, and not ALL scientists' opinons.
Once again, you're (feebly) trying to speak on behalf of the entire scientific community which has a diversity of opinions which are often contradictory or full of paradoxes as you well know.

You're also forgetting or conveniently overlooking that fringe science often includes classified science. To my knowledge and as per your various other posts, you haven't worked in the classified science sectors of the world's militaries/governments like some of the other scientists in this group have, so you're just guessing/assuming what goes on in top-secret govt experiments around the world. Now, to be fair, your "hunch" could be right in that nothing that special goes on in classified science, but the fact remains you don't know for sure as you haven't witnessed what goes on in the black-budget-financed scientific projects going on all over the world in secret over the past few decades...

So let's be honest here - you are essentially only speaking for (most of) the traditional community of mainstream scientists and not those scientists who either have more radical viewpoints (within mainstream science) or else the silent scientists who work in classified arenas of the world's most advanced militaries.

However, I do agree with this statement you made: What makes fringe science on the fringe, is that it is not supported by "accepted science".

But as we all know with looking at history, even including very recent 21st Century history, many ideas that were not "accepted science" initially are now part of mainstream scientific academia and have become universally accepted. Which proves, to my mind, the importance of being able to publically discuss and debate fringe science like we are doing in this group - even if only .0001% of the fringe science theories turn out to be true, these scientific anomalies could revolutionize the whole world...


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