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message 1: by Charbel (last edited Feb 01, 2015 02:31PM) (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments I thought it would be a good idea to set up a thread where we can share quotes that "jump off the page" from the books we're reading.
Here's one:
Among the many and varied literary and artistic studies upon which the natural talents of man are nourished, I think that those above all should be embraced and pursued with the most loving care which have to do with things that are very beautiful and very worthy of knowledge.-Copernicus, On the revolutions of heavenly bodies.


message 2: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Interesting idea Charbel. I often like to quote from my current book so I am sure I'll be a frequent poster here!


message 3: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Same here. In almost every book I read I come across an interesting statement. I often forget them, at least they'd be "backed up" here.


message 4: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments From 'When Death Comes' in "New and Selected Poems" by Mary Oliver

"When it's over, I don't want to wonder
if I have made of my life something particular, and real.
I don't want to find myself sighing and frightened,
or full of argument.

I don't want to end up simply having visited this world."



message 5: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11966 comments Mod
I thought we already have a thread for this, it must not be active though which is why it must have missed.

I do love this quote:

“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”
― Dr. Seuss


message 6: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (laurata) | 13415 comments Mod
Alannah wrote: "I thought we already have a thread for this, it must not be active though which is why it must have missed.

I do love this quote:

“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”
― Dr. Seuss"


So true, but sometimes so difficoul to practice!


message 7: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Alannah wrote: "I thought we already have a thread for this, it must not be active though which is why it must have missed.

I do love this quote:

“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”
― Dr. ..."


We have a thread for favorite quotes located:

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

If I understood Charbel, this thread is slightly different -- it is for things that strike you in the book you are currently reading.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

What a great thread! I've been writing quotes from my reading in notebooks for about the last 10 years. I'm on my 7th composition book.


message 9: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments @Leslie- exactly. Maybe the thread title is not clear enough.

@Terri- that's impressive!


message 10: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Just changed it. I hope it's clear now.


message 11: by Angela M (new)

Angela M I like this idea , Charbel! Thanks .


message 12: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments No problem :)


message 13: by Bionic Jean (new)

Bionic Jean (bionicjean) Love the new title Charbel! Very descriptive of the moment ...


message 14: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn | 1410 comments Hell is the absence of those we long for.
Station Eleven


message 15: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Thanks Jean!

@Evelyn, that's a good one,

@Leslie, I can completely relate to Oliver. That quote eloquently expresses what I want out of life.


message 16: by Pink (new)

Pink Well, I'm currently reading Lady Chatterley's Lover and there are quite a few passages that 'jump off the page' but I don't think they'd be suitable to post, I'll keep an eye out for some less descriptive quotes!

Great idea Charbel :)


message 17: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (laurata) | 13415 comments Mod
Pink wrote: "Well, I'm currently reading Lady Chatterley's Lover and there are quite a few passages that 'jump off the page' but I don't think they'd be suitable to post, I'll keep an eye out for s..."
LOL

Evelyn wrote: "Hell is the absence of those we long for.
Station Eleven"

Great one Evelyn!


message 18: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7684 comments Mod
Pink wrote: "Well, I'm currently reading Lady Chatterley's Lover and there are quite a few passages that 'jump off the page' but I don't think they'd be suitable to post, I'll keep an eye out for s..."

LOL Pink :)


message 19: by Bionic Jean (new)

Bionic Jean (bionicjean) Ha ha ha Pink!
I remember "catch phrase" type quotations. "So it goes" or "Only connect." Once you realise it's going to keep coming back it springs off the page. (Comedy is full of them of course, so I quoted two famous more serious novels.)


message 20: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Pink wrote: "Well, I'm currently reading Lady Chatterley's Lover and there are quite a few passages that 'jump off the page' but I don't think they'd be suitable to post, I'll keep an eye out for s..."

Lol! That actually never crossed my mind, but it sure made my day!


message 21: by Leslie (last edited Feb 04, 2015 05:04PM) (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments And this is why this thread is a good idea:

   "Sir Humphrey, pleased to find his nephew more widely read than he had imagined, unbent and said that he had borrowed the book from Fountain that morning. He presently made another attempt to read a passage aloud and was still more firmly checked. 'Do you remember this bit, Frank?' he began.
    'Yes,' said Mr. Amberley.
    Sir Humphrey informed him that his manners were intolerable."


LOL!! Sir Humphrey needed to be able to post here :D

(from Why Shoot a Butler?)


message 22: by Janice (new)

Janice Sitts | 237 comments Evelyn wrote: "Hell is the absence of those we long for.
Station Eleven"



I just finished Station Eleven, and that line jumped off the page for me too! In fact, I read if over several times.


message 23: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Leslie wrote: "And this is why this thread is a good idea:

   "Sir Humphrey, pleased to find his nephew more widely read than he had imagined, unbent and said that he had borrowed the book from Fountain that mor..."


Lol! That passage just made want to read this book.


message 24: by Charbel (last edited Feb 05, 2015 12:58AM) (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Here's an interesting one. The 'chips' referred to here are computer chips.
" know an old person who has it on good authority that 'chips' are usurping human functions to the extent not only of 'driving tractors' but even of 'fertilizing women'."-Richard Dawkins, The Extended Phenotype: The Long Reach of the Gene.


message 25: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Charbel wrote: "Here's an interesting one. The 'chips' referred to here are computer chips.
" know an old person who has it on good authority that 'chips' are usurping human functions to the extent not only of 'dr..."


Sounds like something from the Vorkosigan series (a sci fi series I am in the middle of)! Bujold's future worlds have mechanical uteruses (uteri?) so she explores how that might affect society in several different ways in her books, including one planet that is entirely populated by men (they buy ova from off-world and then artificially inseminate them).


message 26: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn | 1410 comments Janice wrote: "Evelyn wrote: "Hell is the absence of those we long for.
Station Eleven"


I just finished Station Eleven, and that line jumped off the page for me too! In fact, I read if over several times."


I did too Janice. It is a simple thought, but so true.


message 27: by [deleted user] (last edited Feb 05, 2015 02:53PM) (new)

They did not have to use knife or fork, as was the custom in former centuries. Eating had become a pleasure.

There is something REALLY wrong here. I can't think of liquefied food as an improvement.
Perhaps Hugo Gernsback has come back to us in the shape of Gwyneth Paltrow or one of those people who live on juice cleanses.


message 28: by Lee (new)

Lee Whitney (boobearcat) LOL!


message 29: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Leslie wrote: "Charbel wrote: "Here's an interesting one. The 'chips' referred to here are computer chips.
" know an old person who has it on good authority that 'chips' are usurping human functions to the extent..."


That sounds like an incredibly weird series!


message 30: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Charbel wrote: "Leslie wrote: "Charbel wrote: "Here's an interesting one. The 'chips' referred to here are computer chips.
" know an old person who has it on good authority that 'chips' are usurping human function..."


Not really for a sci fi space opera -- it is pretty interesting to think about how life might be different if certain things we think are fundamental (such as how we reproduce) were changed.


message 31: by Monica (new)

Monica Davis Reflect upon your present blessings--of which every man has many--not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

from: My Father as I Recall Him by Mamie Dickens


message 32: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7684 comments Mod
Monica wrote: "Reflect upon your present blessings--of which every man has many--not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

from: My Father as I Recall Him by [author:Mamie Dickens|..."


Some good advice Monica!


message 33: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments I like that quote Monica!

Amber, too dark and creepy for me. I guess that is why I don't read King...


message 34: by Monica (new)

Monica Davis Greg & Leslie, that is a quote from Charles Dickens. His daughter included it in her book about him.


message 35: by Bionic Jean (new)

Bionic Jean (bionicjean) It is from "A Christmas Dinner", one of Dickens's early Christmas stories. The story describes a Christmas dinner at the home of Uncle and Aunt George. It was originally published in Bell's Life in London in 1835 under the name "Scenes and Characters No. 10 Christmas Festivities".


message 36: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (laurata) | 13415 comments Mod
As said elesewhere, I HAVE to read this biography by her!


message 37: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7684 comments Mod
There was some discussion of Thomas Carlyle on another thread; so I pulled Sartor Resartus off my shelf to take a peek. Yes, just as weird and haphazard as I remembered, but this quote stands out:

"Thus, like some wild-flaming, wild-thundering train of Heaven's Artillery, does this mysterious MANKIND thunder and flame, in long-drawn, quick-succeeding grandeur, through the unknown Deep."


message 38: by Monica (new)

Monica Davis Greg, that sounds like a great line for a Sunday sermon.

With all the birthday talk of late, I had to smile when I read this passage from Anthem by Ayn Rand:

"Thus must all men live until they are forty. At forty, they are worn out. At forty, they are sent to the Home of the Useless, where the Old Ones live. The Old Ones do not work, for the State takes care of them."

:-) 40? Don't they know that 40 is the "new 20"??


message 39: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7684 comments Mod
Monica wrote: "Don't they know that 40 is the "new 20"??"

I emphatically agree!! :D


message 40: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn | 1410 comments Hmmmm retirement at 40 doesn't sound too bad some days......


message 41: by Monica (new)

Monica Davis Just finished Anthem by Ayn Rand. Extraordinary. This is my favorite passage:

"Through all the darkness, through all the shame of which men are capable, the spirit of man will remain alive on this earth. It may sleep, but it will awaken. It may wear chains, but it will break through. And man will go on."


message 42: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments That's very impactful Monica. I always find myself in a difficult position with Ayn Rand; in the sense that I want to read something by her while simultaneously not wanting to read something by her.


message 43: by Charbel (last edited Feb 12, 2015 02:36AM) (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments This is from the introduction of The Dawkins Delusion?: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by Richard Dawkins:

"Dawkins preaches to his god-hating choirs, who are clearly expected to relish his rhetorical salvoes and raise their hands high in adulation. Those who think biological evolution can be reconciled with religion are dishonest! Amen! They belong to the 'Neville Chamberlain school' of evolutionists! They are appeasers! Amen! Real scientists reject belief in God! Hallelujah! The God that Jews believed in back in the Old Testament times is a psychotic child abuser! Amen! You tell them, brother!"

Though I like the imagery, he might be exaggerating the high regard nonbelievers hold Dawkins in.


message 44: by Leslie (last edited Feb 26, 2015 07:45AM) (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments This isn't a quote per se, but a passage that forcibly brought to mind a train of thought.

From Appleby's End, 2 local policemen are describing to Appleby why he has been sent to the village of Snarl:

" 'Well, Sir Mulberry has a great eye for swine, it seems, and is uncommon fond of 'em. And that brings me to the fact that he's a close friend of Colonel Pike's here -- by which I mean to say that when this queer thing happened he told the colonel about it at once.' Mutlow's face was extremely wooden. 'For this particular boar, you see, he thought a world of -- and if you're to believe his men about the place he'd be across and visit it most every morning. ..."

The thought that jumped off the page was that England must have many more pig-fanciers than anyplace else in the world!!! I can't think of any descriptions of pig-fanciers in any American books... :P

I have come across them in several different types of English books - from Wodehouse's Blandings Castle books to Thirkell's Barsetshire series and now here in a English mystery!


message 45: by Charbel (new)

Charbel (queez) | 2690 comments Lol Leslie!


message 46: by Monica (new)

Monica Davis Once in a while an author uses descriptive phrasing that makes one stop in appreciation. In Assassin's Quest,Robin Hobb uses the following lines:

"There is a dead spot in the night, that coldest, blackest time when the world has forgotten evening and dawn is not yet a promise. A time when it is far too early to arise, but so late that going to bed makes small sense. That was when Burrich came in."

I know that time.


message 47: by Bionic Jean (new)

Bionic Jean (bionicjean) "England must have many more pig-fanciers than anyplace else in the world!"

Not sure about that, but one of the honours awarded to the winner of this literary prize may indicate that you have a point, Leslie ;)


message 48: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Jean wrote: ""England must have many more pig-fanciers than anyplace else in the world!"

Not sure about that, but one of the honours awarded to the winner of this literary prize may indicate that you have a po..."


LOL!! Love it!


message 49: by B the BookAddict (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments From The News Where You Are by Catherine O'Flynn

“Our absence is what remains of us.”

I must have read that sentence about fifteen times; I think it is so true, it made me think of my husband.


message 50: by Monica (new)

Monica Davis B the BookAddict wrote: "Our absence is what remains of us.”

I like that one, B.


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