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What did you read last month? > What did you read in ~~ March

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message 1: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 31, 2020 03:28PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments

What books did you start the new decade with ?

Here is the Folder to tell us what your monthly reads for March 2020 were.

Please provide:
~ A GoodReads link
~ A few sentences telling us how you felt about the book.
~ How would you rate the book


message 2: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11835 comments I had a good reading month and am happy to share the following. That written, i suspect my tolerance for meandering reading is decreasing enormously. Even books below that i liked felt as though plenty of trimming could have enhanced the impact.

The month started with a couple of old but goodie mysteries.

The 39 Steps by John Buchan is one of those older political/mystery thrillers. An ordinary man meets a man who claims an assassination is ahead for a world leader. The rest is chase. I liked it, improbably as bits were.

Two mysteries by Georgette Heyer were made available to me after a long online wait. Both are considered part of her "country house mysteries". The Unfinished Clue about the murder of a wealthy man who is unbearably cruel to family & friends. As he was dying it appears he was writing a clue.

The second, A Blunt Instrument, is about the murder of a similar man and there are plenty of suspects. In this case, however, everyone claims the deceased was a good guy. Only slowly, as detectives follow suspects do they learn of the man's dastardly deeds! I don't think i'll read any more of these for awhile. There are so many witty sayings that may or may not allude to things of the '20s, that i cannot keep up.

Now, a really interesting murder case is Salvation of a Saint. This mystery is more about how the suspect could have killed her husband while she was in upper Japan for several days. Long but the answer was incredible and one i wouldn't have guessed ever. Keigo Higashino is brilliant with his mysteries featuring professor "Detective Galileo", as the cops call him for his scientific answers to their puzzles.

Longbourn is another book from the world of Jane Austen's novels. In this case author
Jo Baker follows the servants. Each chapter begins with a line from Pride and Prejudice which informs the chapter itself. I really liked this one for the story. However, this is the second such book i've read this year wherein Mr. Bennett is more than just the man reading in his library. I felt Baker weakened her novel by suddenly dropping in several chapters about the military service of one character. It put a full stop to my interest & it took all i had to resume...though i'm very glad i did.

As we were headed to England, i wanted to read about one of the royals, so read Anne Somerset's Queen Anne: The Politics of Passion. As much of what we now consider normal in the UK began during her reign, it was an informative book. The Catholic vs. Church of England battle was remarkable. Somerset quoted abundantly from Sarah Churchill's book about the Queen, written after their falling out. While quoting from her diaries as well balanced things a bit, overall i felt she used it to the detriment of allowing the Queen much in the brains category. Yes, this is the one upon which the most recent film was based.

Behind Rebel Lines is a YA about Emma Edwards, a woman who disguised herself as a man to join the Union army. While beginning as part of the medical unit, she soon became a spy who managed to cross the battle lines for different jobs. The book was effective and i liked what i learned. I must add that the author, Seymour Reit, was also the man who helped create Casper the Friendly Ghost! Love it.

I found Carnegie Hill by Jonathan Vatner from one of the lists Alias shared a few months ago. It's about modern day NYC & life in an upper crust apartment co-op. There's much humor, some sadness but a good introduction to older people living in the city, learning to cope with retirement & old age. I liked that it also addressed the lives of a couple of the staff members, too.

Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea was on the list Alias published earlier this year, "101 Best Books of the 21st Century". (https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... ) Author Barbara Demick wrote about the lives of people who escaped North Korea, selecting one town in the upper peninsula as an example of the sort of lives & why people left. It is a remarkably sad story but full of all sorts of information about NK and its Cult Of Leaders.

Barbara's review of Please See Us led me to read this Caitlin Mullen novel. Each chapter is in the voice of different characters, including dead women whose bodies have yet to be discovered. The main characters, a teenager with psychic abilities whose talents are exploited by her aunt, and a young woman who has fled New York after a disastrous PR experience, work together, in a way, to figure out the former's visions. Thanks, Barbara.

Shomeret mentioned The Calculating Stars in her year's best list and the blurb sounded up my alley. It was. Mary Robinette Kowal wrote the novel before Margot Lee Shetterly's Hidden Figures was published but i'm glad i read HF first. The premise is that in 1952 a meteorite strike imperils life on Earth. It is then understood that over the next decade or so the planet will end up uninhabitable, so a space program is begun. The novel address sexism and one character's anxiety over being in the public eye, as well. Again, this was over-long but i liked it quite a bit. As it turns out there is a sequel but i haven't yet read it. Good one.

A Man Lay Dead by Ngaio Marsh is another sort of UK wealthy manners, etc., mystery. I liked it and won't be surprised if i someday try another in her series.

999: The Extraordinary Young Women of the First Official Jewish Transport to Auschwitz is about the first group of Slovak young women sent to Auschwitz. They arrived so early they tore down original structures & made the bricks for subsequent buildings. What i appreciated were the aspects not often addressed in such concentration camps, such as menstruation. Of course it is a sad story but if i wanted to introduce a teenage girl to the holocaust, this would be the book i shared, as author Heather Dune Macadam wrote to make the reader feel some of the embarrassment teenagers would feel at stripping in front of the soldiers with guns, etc.

Several people here have mentioned Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, so i had to read it, right? I'm glad i did. The story of Kya, who is slowly abandoned by her entire family is shared but also how she grew up alone and thrived. Her attention to the swamp critters and botany around her imbue this book with treasures well worthwhile. Thanks to Dem, Alias and Samanta particularly for sharing their pleasure in this one!


message 3: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1056 comments Wow, Deb.....that's some terrific reading last month. I'm impressed!

Salvation of a Saint sounds right up my alley. Thanks! I'll keep an eye open for it.
….just checked the website of an independent bookstore that is still taking online orders (and hand delivering the books to homes)…..they have a copy of his book, Newcomer, so I'll be getting that one.


message 4: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1056 comments Here are the books I read in March:

Solaris (sci-fi; 2 stars) - I still think that this book had a good premise. Sadly, it wasn't presented in an exciting manner.
Review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Fools Crow (4 star) - a thought provoking look at a time when White Man was moving West. Told from the point of view of the Pikuni people, this story tells of mysticism, traditions, customs, confusion and so much more. It's a side we don't usually hear from.
Review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Open and Shut (4 star) - I really enjoy Andy Carpenter. This reads like the first book of a series. The characters haven't learned to smoothly work together but it's still a fun romp and I'm glad I read the beginning of the story.
Sadly, the second book is out of print and hard to find, so I will probably have to move to the third soon.
Review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 5: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2413 comments madrano wrote: "I had a good reading month and am happy to share the following. That written, i suspect my tolerance for meandering reading is decreasing enormously. Even books below that i liked felt as though pl..."

You read quite a lot- they all sound do interesting! I do like a Heyer book! Owens book is on my list too!


message 6: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments madrano wrote:
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea was on the list Alias published earlier this year, "101 Best Books of the 21st Century". (https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... ) Author Barbara Demick wrote about the lives of people who escaped North Korea, selecting one town in the upper peninsula as an example of the sort of lives & why people left. It is a remarkably sad story but full of all sorts of information about NK and its Cult Of Leaders.


You had an excellent reading month, deb.
I have Nothing to envy on my TBR list. I'm glad to see you liked it.

Also I didn't know if people still wanted me to post the book lists as libraries and book stores in most places are closed. I guess people can write a TBR list for when they open again or order online. Some may be available in eBook format.


message 7: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments Petra wrote: "Here are the books I read in March:

Solaris (sci-fi; 2 stars) - I still think that this book had a good premise. Sadly, it wasn't presented in an exciting manner.
Review: https://www...."


Two 4 star books isn't bad. Thank you for sharing, Petra.


message 8: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments I only managed one book this month.

Have You Seen Luis Velez? by Catherine Ryan Hyde Have You Seen Luis Velez? by Catherine Ryan Hyde
Fiction
Rating 3/5
I enjoyed this book. However, after a while it got too preachy for me. Also the main character was a bit too good to be true even for a work of fiction. It's not listed as a YA book, but it had that feel to me.


message 9: by John (last edited Apr 01, 2020 06:43PM) (new)

John | 1224 comments Here are three that I liked and could recommend as titles to get engrossed in:


Swallows & Robins - The Guests In My Garden, Englishwoman runs a guest house in France, with really funny and poignant tales, depending on the guests, of her time doing so. Just a note that this was a free book via Kindle Lending library.


A History of English Food by Clarissa Dickson Wright, one of television's Two Fat Ladies - she kept things relevant to a modern reader making a very interesting read, indeed!

Stet: An Editor's Life - exceeded my expectations, although that could be because I realized by the end the audio narration was such a great fit. Still, she does a great job of showing what her professional life as an editor and tailed, along with the second half of the book dealing with specific clients by name. Ended up glad I dropped a credit on it a while back!


message 10: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 01, 2020 06:49PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments John wrote: "
Swallows & Robins - The Guests In My Garden, Englishwoman runs a guest house in France, with really funny and poignant tales, depending on the guests, of her time doing so. Just a note that this was a free book via Kindle Lending library.


I just looked and the only Amazon offering is a used book starting at $37.50

:( I guess it's not an Amazon Lending library selection anymore.


message 11: by Samanta (last edited Apr 02, 2020 01:15PM) (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments Hi, everyone! These are my March reads:

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
Genre: Fantasy, YA
Rating: A
Review: You all know I'm a big fan of Harry Potter so there is no point writing again how much I loved the book. :D Things are getting increasingly darker with each book since Lord Voldemort is finally out and about wreaking havoc upon both magical and Muggle worlds and it's seems like he is winning the war. One book left to go.

The Romans by Kathryn Welch
Genre: History
Rating: B
Review: An interesting overview of the daily life, some important people, traditions, customs of the Romans, with the mention of some famous events from the Roman history. Reads almost like as encyclopedia.

A las arenas by Antonio Skármeta
Genre: Short Story
Rating: B
Review: I enjoyed this short story about two Latinos (from Mexico and Chile) trying to do their own thing in USA (New York) without really knowing the language. Their attempts at speaking English were hilarious.
FUN FACT: The author is a Chilean of Croatian origin. Skarmeta is a Croatian surname that originates from the island of Brač in Dalmatia. He also look very Dalmatian. :)

The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin
Genre: Short Story
Rating: A
Review: This a very, VERY short story (2 pages!) about a woman who finds out she became a widow. Her first natural reaction is grief because her husband was a good man who loved her and she loved him....most of the time. After the initial grief she starts feeling relief because she is finally free. I will not spoil the ending because it's just wonderful and humorous as is the whole story. I love Chopin's writing and her topics are generally about the freedom for women and Feminism.

A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift
Genre: Short Story
Rating: B
Review: I am not a fan of Jonathan Swift (at least I absolutely detested Gulliver's Travels) but I found this short story very interesting and funny. In it, Swift, proposes eating the excess of children to prevent famine and lower the number of people in the Kingdom. Although I found his detailed descriptions on ways to prepare dishes from children disgusting, I couldn't help but chuckle. Also, I don't know much about Swift as a person, so I can't say if his blatant racism was part of the story or if those were his personal opinions.

Slice of Cherry by Dia Reeves
Genre: YA, Fantasy, Crime
Rating: B
Review: So.....this book is both brilliant and weird. It's a story about twin sisters, Fancy and Kit, daughters of the local serial killer known as the Bonesaw Killer, who live in a small town in Texas called Portero. Their father was caught red-handed by their mother and is now waiting his execution. The girls are living under the stigma of being a serial killer's daughters and that's why they keep to themselves. What others don't know (but everybody suspects, because "the offspring of a psycho is sure to end up the same") is that the girls have the same tendencies as their father.

Adultolescence by Gabbie Hanna
Genre: Poetry
Rating: B
Review: This collection of poems written by a famous? youtuber Gabbie Hanna really resonated with me. To be honest, I have no idea who she is (I don't "do" youtubers, really), but I stumbled upon the book in the bookstore and it just called to me. I read a few of the poems while still in the bookstore and decided to buy it. The style is not particularly great nor can it be called "serious" poetry; the "poems" are mostly (not so) random thoughts put together that sometimes work and sometimes not so much, but most of the themes are great. The title of the collection is also perfect. My 17-year-old sister considers it not-readable and maybe the 17-year-old Samanta would think exactly the same, but 33-year-old finds herself in it a lot...maybe too much.

Who Killed the Widow? by Mario Benedetti
Genre: Short Story
Rating: C
Review: This is my second Mario Benedetti short story and although it's not nearly as good as the first one I read, it has the same abrupt and unexpected ending. Nevertheless, the story is too short for it all to make any sense.

Tangled by Emma Chase
Genre: Contemporary Romance
Rating: C
Review: A few years ago, when I first read this novel, I found it hilarious. I still find it hilarious because Emma Chase can deliver sarcasm and I love sarcasm, but boy did I grow out of these kinds of books. This was about the only thing I could concentrate on these days and it took me more time than usual.


message 12: by Annette (new)

Annette (annetteshistoricalfiction) | 102 comments People Like Us
People Like Us by Louise Fein
5/5 How was it possible for Hitler to lure masses of people to follow his extreme views? After WWI, the Treaty of Versailles forced Germans to pay war reparations, which had crushing effects on economy and humiliating effects on patriotic Germans. Hitler, a mesmerizing public speaker, blamed all bad things on Jews and communist minorities, claiming they were trying to take over the world. With worldwide economic depression and high unemployment, he put blame on the ineffectiveness of democratic government, thus calling for a New Order, promising to restore prosperity for all with no class divisions.
Most of this story is set within the two years preceding WWII, giving a glimpse into how humans in dire situation can be manipulated and pushed into doing atrocities.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Tsarina
Tsarina by Ellen Alpsten
4/5 Catherine Alexeyevna (1684-1727) was of humble beginnings, becoming the second wife of Peter the Great and Empress of Russia from 1725 until her death. “Pulling herself out of poverty and servitude through her intellect, wit, and sensuality, she rose to become one of the most powerful women in Russia.”
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Spindle City
Spindle City by Jotham Burrello
5/5 This story brings a historical background for a city once prospering from textile mills and now facing union strikes. But for most of the part this is a moving story of a father, who after losing his wife, struggles to keep his family together.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

The Brideship Wife
The Brideship Wife by Leslie Howard
4/5 This story of the brideship women is relatively unknown chapter of Canadian history. The idea was to give the women of different backgrounds including impoverished gentlewomen and serving class a chance to marry or live independently in the colony of British Columbia. Where there were supposedly more opportunities, which later turned out not necessarily true.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

The Joyce Girl
The Joyce Girl by Annabel Abbs
5/5 Lucia Joyce (1907-1982) is a talented dancer. Her talents extend to singing, painting, and plying the piano. She is the muse for her father’s books. Despite making her name as a dancer, she is known as James Joyce’s daughter. This story brings a few years of her life, when she is the most successful in her career, trying to be recognized under her own name and not her father’s. These are a short few years before she is diagnosed with mental illness.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

To Calais, in Ordinary Time
To Calais, in Ordinary Time by James Meek
3/5 England, 1348. This story is driven by three main characters. Bernadine, a gentlewoman, who flees arranged marriage. A proctor, who is returning home from England to Avignon, France, where pestilence has already reached. Therefore, he doesn’t know what awaits him there; an empty villa or his housekeepers welcoming him. Will Quate, a handsome young ploughman, who is also a skilled bowman. He volunteers as an archer, thus it takes him on the same road to Calais as the fleeing bride and returning proctor.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Sin Eater
Sin Eater by Megan Campisi
3/5 “Sin eaters existed in parts of Britain until roughly a century ago. (…) They ate a piece of bread beside people’s coffins to absolve their sins in a folk ritual with Christian resonances.”
16th century England. Fourteen year old May Owens is arrested for stealing bread. Her penalty is to be a sin eater.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

The Lost Diary of Venice
The Lost Diary of Venice by Margaux Deroux
3/5 Present day Connecticut. Rose, a book restorer, is approached by a struggling painter William Lomazzo to restore a book about art by Giovanni Lomazzo.
Renaissance Venice. Giovanni Lomazzo is commissioned by Sebastiano Venier to paint his courtesan Chiara.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 13: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments Samanta wrote: "Hi, everyone! These are my March reads:

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
Genre: Fantasy, YA
Rating: A
Review: You all know I'm a big fan of Harry Po..."


Wow ! Very nice month, Samanta !


message 14: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments Annette wrote: "People Like Us
People Like Us by Louise Fein
5/5 How was it possible for Hitler to lure masses of people to follow his extreme views? After WWI, the Treaty of Versailles force..."


Annette, what an interesting reading month you had.

I checked to see if my library had a copy of People Like Us and didn't see anything which is odd. So I went to Amazon and see the book is being published May 7, 2020. So I guess you got an advanced copy.

Thanks for the heads-up on this book. I am putting in on my TBR list.

Spindle City also intrigues me. I am a fan of
Richard Russo who often writes of the economically depressed towns in upstate NY due to the lose of manufacturing.


message 15: by John (last edited Apr 02, 2020 10:48AM) (new)

John | 1224 comments Alias Reader wrote: "John wrote: "
Swallows & Robins - The Guests In My Garden, Englishwoman runs a guest house in France, with really funny and poignant tales, depending on the guests, of her time doing so. Just a not..."


Yes, it is. You need to search specifically for the Kindle edition directly via your Fire tablet to download your April free book. I just looked now and it is definitely there! It can get confusing when the same book title has different Amazon listings for third-party used copies!


message 16: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11835 comments Petra, i have had a difficult time locating a copy of Newcomer by Higashino with my online resource. Once libraries open, i hope i'll be able to find one. His mysteries are intriguing but sometimes it takes so long that i find myself getting impatient. Which, of course, is the entire point of these long-to-solve stories--showing mysteries aren't really easy to solve, even if you know whodunit.

It's disappointing that Stanisław Lem novel wasn't more rewarding. I know there have been a couple of movies based on it, which had me wondering if i wanted to read the book.


message 17: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11835 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Also I didn't know if people still wanted me to post the book lists as libraries and book stores in most places are closed. I guess people can write a TBR list for when they open again or order online. Some may be available in eBook format"

I think it's useful to post them now, if it's not too much trouble. Imagine if you wait until libraries open again--those posts would be full of 50 books each! Probably more, as even librarians must be reading more now than ever.

As you know, i have my TBR but before adding the books from the list to that list, i check out my e-Libraries to see if it's available as an eBook. That way i can put it on my waiting list & maybe fool myself into thinking i have fewer on my TBR. Sure, deb, sure. :-)

It's a shame your sole March book wasn't more rewarding. I've had months like that & they do nothing to encourage me, i must say. Better luck with the next one.


message 18: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11835 comments John, i appreciate your comments on the Diane Athill book. Interesting that you suspect the narrator may have been a great asset to your pleasure in it.

The bird book you & Alias discussed sounds good, too.


message 19: by madrano (last edited Apr 02, 2020 12:52PM) (new)

madrano | 11835 comments Samanta, your comments on both short stories by Chopin & Swift are perfect...and i agree. Sometimes i marvel how writers can put so much into any short story, let along the Very Short ones.

The book about Romans sounds terrific and i'm going to look for it.

I loved your comment about the poetry book & what your younger self would think of the book. How true for all of us, i suspect, but you nailed it quite well.

Thanks, again, for sharing with us.


message 20: by madrano (last edited Apr 02, 2020 01:02PM) (new)

madrano | 11835 comments Annette, it appears you had a somewhat rewarding month of reading. You mentioned how some of the novels were scant on historic facts, which is why i finally decided i would read fewer fiction books about things that interest me. I ended up frustrated. Still, there are times when a person really wants to read about specific topics, such as those you mentioned. For instance the Jotham Burrello novel about the US textile industry.

And i must add that i've never heard of Sin Eaters. How fascinating. Now i know where to turn if i want a sense of that notion. Megan Campisi's novel sounds right.

I see Alias couldn't find the Louise Fein book you read. Nor could i. However, her latest is on order. It's called Daughter of the Reich.

Thanks for all the titles.


message 21: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments madrano wrote: "Samanta, your comments on both short stories by Chopin & Swift are perfect...and i agree. Sometimes i marvel how writers can put so much into any short story, let along the Very Short ones.

The bo..."


Thank you, madrano :)


message 22: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11835 comments :-)


message 23: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments Alias Reader wrote: "John wrote: "
Swallows & Robins - The Guests In My Garden, Englishwoman runs a guest house in France, with really funny and poignant tales, depending on the guests, of her time doing so. Just a not..."
--------------------
John wrote: "
Yes, it is. You need to search specifically for the Kindle edition directly via your Fire tablet to download your April free book. I just looked now and it is definitely there! It can get confusing when the same book title has different Amazon listings for third-party used copies!..."


I see that it is free for Kindle Unlimited. Which you pay to join for $10 a month.

If I want to buy the Kindle version it is $4


message 24: by John (last edited Apr 03, 2020 06:19PM) (new)

John | 1224 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "John wrote: "
Swallows & Robins - The Guests In My Garden, Englishwoman runs a guest house in France, with really funny and poignant tales, depending on the guests, of her time..."


It is free for Prime Members now, I just checked! To get the book for free, you must log into the Kindle store via a Kindle eReader or Fire tablet! Otherwise, it will appear for sale only. No phones, no desktop, no laptop, etc.


message 25: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments John wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "John wrote: "
Swallows & Robins - The Guests In My Garden, Englishwoman runs a guest house in France, with really funny and poignant tales, depending on the guests, of her time..."

It is free for Prime Members now, I just checked! To get the book for free, you must log into the Kindle store via a Kindle eReader or Fire tablet! Otherwise, it will appear for sale only. No phones, no desktop, no laptop, etc..."


When I did it on the kindle the large print said Kindle Unlimited.
under that in very tiny print it said kindle lending library. I tapped on that, then it said Read Now and I tapped that.

Thank you for explaining this. The Lending Library seems to be well hidden and not really clear at all.

I went to my manage my account page and it listed it as a lending library book. I was concerned that I had inadvertently started the 30 day trial for kindle unlimited but I didn't.

Thank you again for your patience, John.


message 26: by John (new)

John | 1224 comments I was being... ummm... persitent as I knew you were entitled to that benefit!


message 27: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 04, 2020 04:19PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments John wrote: "I was being... ummm... persitent as I knew you were entitled to that benefit!"

:) I guess even an old dog like me can learn new tricks. Thank you.


message 28: by John (new)

John | 1224 comments I find the Kindle Lending Library benefit rather poorly designed! To be brutally honest, I have found many of the eligible books by consulting "people who bought this also bought these" finding most of the Kindle Unlimited titles indicated to fall within the Kindle Lending Library subset.


message 29: by Marie (new)

Marie | 207 comments March was a good month for me - read some creepy stuff and also read an urban fantasy omnibus.

Immunity A Novel of the Horrific Northwest by Jeffrey Caston by Jeffrey Caston - 4 stars.
My review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


The Seance in Apartment 10 by Ambrose Ibsen by Ambrose Ibsen - 4 stars.
My review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

The Picture Frame by Iain Rob Wright by Iain Rob Wright - 4 stars
My review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Shadow Detective Urban Fantasy Horror Series Books 1-3 (Shadow Detective Boxset Book 1) by William Massa by William Massa - 4 stars
My review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 30: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11835 comments Fascinating stories, Marie! I like stories set in Oregon but Immunity is a honking big book, so i'm not sure i'll follow up.

No problems, though, since the other sound as intriguing and with less time commitment. I learned the Ouija lesson when i was in high school but picture frames? LOL! Wow.

You had a good reading month--congratulations.


message 31: by Marie (new)

Marie | 207 comments madrano wrote: "Fascinating stories, Marie! I like stories set in Oregon but Immunity is a honking big book, so i'm not sure i'll follow up.

No problems, though, since the other sound as intriguing and with less..."


Thank you Madrano! That was a fun month! :)


message 32: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19099 comments Well done, Marie !


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