Never too Late to Read Classics discussion

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"Let us Chat a Moment!" > Rosemarie, I Have a Question?

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message 1: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Have you often found yourself stuck in a Classic without understanding what that paragraph meant?
A term you have never heard of or what it meant in this tale?
I just read that and...What did I miss?

Need support while reading a Classic read. Sometime I know I have asked Rosemarie what something meant. If you are reading on your own your more than welcome to add your thoughts and /or questions here.


message 2: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (last edited Jan 08, 2020 03:41PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
I have loved reading all my life and studied literature in university, as did my elder daughter.
If you have any questions about books, genres and especially literary terms, I will be glad to answer them, and if I don't know right away, I will do some research.

I am a retired teacher, and learned over the years that every question asked is relevant, no matter how small or trivial the subject seemed to be.

I'm here to help and learn along with you.

Happy reading!


message 3: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (last edited Jan 08, 2020 04:03PM) (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2506 comments Mod
A great idea for a thread, likely much needed!

I don’t have years of teaching experience, only an English minor on my degree. Any questions I see that I can answer, though, I will. :)


message 4: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
That would be helpful, Samantha. It's good to have more than one resource person.


message 5: by Trisha (new)

Trisha | 836 comments A brilliant idea - I really appreciate this.


message 6: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Rosemarie have you read any of Françoise Sagan's novels. I understand she mostly writes romance and has Classic and Modern time frames for her books?


message 7: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (last edited Feb 17, 2020 05:08AM) (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
I read her most famous book Bonjour tristesse(1954) in my 20s and loved it.
Later, I read Un certain sourire (1955) and thought it was just okay and really don't remember any of the plot, just my impression of the book.


message 8: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
I have Aimez-vous Brahms on my wish list. It looks interesting.
She seems interesting as a person too!

I will have to add Bonjour Tristesse to my list as well.
Thank you!


message 9: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
You're welcome.


message 10: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments By coincidence I saw her on TV last night. She drives like a maniac!


message 11: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
What show were you watching, Bernard?


message 12: by Jazzy (last edited Feb 17, 2020 06:59AM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) Bonjour Tristesse is a stunner, written when the author was only 18, so the feelings are well represented - the feels are real! I've actually got it on my re-read list this year for a couple of challenges. I've read it about 4-5 times and love the film as well.


message 13: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments It was a prog about Paris, with Clive James, who had lived there. She gave him a lift. He was terrified!


message 14: by Jazzy (last edited Feb 17, 2020 06:59AM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) By the way, if you like Françoise Sagan, why not read Colette?


message 15: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
I have read Colette's stories about Claudine.


message 16: by Jazzy (last edited Feb 17, 2020 07:20AM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) I have Chéri and the consecutive books and The Collected Stories and I also have Secrets Of The Flesh: A Life Of Colette a biography by Judith Thurman

She had the most remarkable and amazing life!


message 17: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Bernard wrote: "It was a prog about Paris, with Clive James, who had lived there. She gave him a lift. He was terrified!"

Is that the Postcard series?


message 18: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments Yes, "Postcard from Paris". He was an amusing man, and a great ambassador for Australian culture, along with Dame Edna.


message 19: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) When you don't watch television it feels like everyone else is in a secret club of which you aren't a member ;)


message 20: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments You are right Jazzy. I am a member of SSTW (Secret Society of Television Watchers).


message 21: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2506 comments Mod
Don’t forget the SSNS — Secret Society of Netflix Subscribers. There’s also a Hulu edition of that and amazon prime for all these companies’ exclusive programs.


message 22: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
My husband is the TV watcher in our house. The only tv I watched was the occasional kid's show with my grandkids, a few years ago.
I don't even remember the last show I watched-it was probably an old movie.


message 23: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments Samantha wrote: "Don’t forget the SSNS — Secret Society of Netflix Subscribers. There’s also a Hulu edition of that and amazon prime for all these companies’ exclusive programs."

Yes, there are now hundreds of digital channels available. I can even watch Japanese tv, NHK in English.


message 24: by Jazzy (last edited Feb 18, 2020 07:11AM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) oh if we had Hulu and it was free I would watch it, but it's not available in my country. I used to have a shared Netflix sub, but when the lad's father took it over he changed the password and removed me :P

amazon? Forget it!

But everyone keeps talking about things I never heard about ahaha


message 25: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Bernard wrote: "You are right Jazzy. I am a member of SSTW (Secret Society of Television Watchers)."

Do not forget the SSCL!


message 26: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) Secret Society of Classic Literature, Lesle?

I'm a member of that!


message 27: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Nope!


message 28: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) This is a deer with no eyes!


message 29: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
Secret Society of Chocolate Lovers?


message 30: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2506 comments Mod
When it comes to books or tv, I simply love a good story with complex characters and a well-developed plot.


message 31: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
I agree with you there, Samantha.


message 32: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments Secret Society of Corporate Layabouts?


message 33: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (last edited Feb 22, 2020 11:31PM) (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "Secret Society of Chocolate Lovers?"

I am surprised Bernard did not get this one!
Good job Rosemarie!

Nothing better than a Novel with Complex Characters and a Well Developed Plot along with a box of Chocolates and your favorite Beverage!


message 34: by Piyangie, Classical Princess (new)

Piyangie | 854 comments Mod
How did I miss this thread?? Thanks, Lesle for opening the thread and Rosemarie for being so kind in accepting to lend support to us readers of classics.


message 35: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
You're welcome!


message 36: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments When this thread appeared, I was sure I would have lots of questions. But so far, none! But it is comforting to know that when I do have one, there is somewhere to go for the answer.


message 37: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Piyangie, sometimes when researching or someone else mentions an author or a book, it is often nice to have a Friend like Rosemarie to answer those questions like....Is it worth me trying to find this book? What style does this author have? Do I have to find a dictionary, notepad, and pen to read this one? I cannot find someone else that is reading this Classic to discuss a section that no matter how many times I read it, I just do not get it?

So many thoughts that now can be answered by someone we all trust to give us a fair answer!


message 38: by Piyangie, Classical Princess (new)

Piyangie | 854 comments Mod
Exactly, Lesle. Rosemarie's opinion will be invaluable for me in the future. I've started learning French so that with time I can read French books in French (That is the goal anyhow). I really would like to find from her the easy short books, perhaps children's stories that I could begin with. And also many more regarding other classics. So glad that a friend like her is there to help.


message 39: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2506 comments Mod
Piyangie, I forget where you live, but you should try inquiring if your local library has bilingual children’s books with French as the second language. If not, maybe they could get some for you. Another thing I’ve heard of people doing when trying to learn a second language is reading their favorite books in that language or watching their favorite movies in it.


message 40: by Jazzy (last edited Feb 23, 2020 10:03AM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) youtube is full of great aids, children's books in other languages, etc. I had lots of fun with Jip and Janeke


message 41: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
A really fun French series for kids and grown ups is Le Petit Nicolas by René Goscinny and the rest of the books in the series. They are really funny.


message 42: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments And the Asterix books of course. And Tintin.


message 43: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
Exactly, Bernard! They are such fun books.


message 44: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Smith | 2977 comments The captain was called Haddock in French! Curious. The story is that Mrs Herge suggested the name. But why? Does the word sound amusing to French speakers?


message 45: by Piyangie, Classical Princess (new)

Piyangie | 854 comments Mod
Thanks all, for the information/opinion. Appreciate it. I'm currently reading the Tintin series and I could try them in French as Bernard has suggested. I'll check on what you've suggested Rosemarie. And as Samantha has mentioned, I could read a familiar or favourite book in French. That sounds quite appealing.


message 46: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
Rosemarie what are the books called that have English on one side of an open book and French on the other side for the purpose of learning to read in a new language. I know we talked about this before but I cannot remember.


message 47: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
In Canada we call them dual-language books.


message 48: by Jazzy (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) They are also called Bilingual books.


message 49: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5408 comments Mod
That is right Rosemarie, that is how you can look them up under the one online bookstore I order from!
Thanks!


message 50: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8782 comments Mod
Thanks for the info, Jazzy. The terms can often differ depending on the country.


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