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Bulletin Board > Bad Reviews and the Star Rating System

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message 1: by Keith (new)

Keith Owens | 37 comments Believe me I know it hurts. Been there. But I think the best thing to do is get to work on the next book, and then the book after that, and then the book after that. Never, ever let a bad review stop your rhythm. It may be a painful bump in the road, but it's just that. A bump. Nothing more. Lots more road to go.


message 2: by Yzabel (new)

Yzabel Ginsberg (yzabelginsberg) | 262 comments Don't believe for a single moment that 1-2 star reviews are going to sink your sales. Almost all the "your Amazon review helped someone buy this product" notifications I got were for books I rated 1-2 stars. Not the 4-5 star reviews. Don't ask me for an explanation, I don't have any...

1-2 stars are actually good because they're proof the people who read are real buyers. Not just friends and family leaving glowing reviews because they like the author, or fake ratings left by author & friends using sock-puppet accounts. As weird as it seems, those low ratings add credibility to books. Personnally, I'm very, very wary of novels with only glowing reviews: no author, not even the Big Names like Stephen King, ever manages to please everybody. Anything hailed as 100% good immediately makes me go into "OK, where's the catch?" mode.

(As for ratings only, most readers don't pay that much attention. They read the actual reviews, the ones that explain why the person didn't like the book. One man's trash is another's treasure, and all that. I may very well buy a book precisely because another reviewer 1-starred it for, say, not having any romance, and I'm not in the mood for romance so this is just perfect for me, and then, who knows, maybe I'll give the book 4 stars.)

In other words: don't sweat it. :)
What hurts much, much more than low reviews is the author throwing hissy fits about them. Now that hurts sales and drives people to *not* buying anything by that person.


message 3: by Jason (new)

Jason Crawford (JasonPatrickCrawford) | 62 comments Especially if the hissy-fit includes stalking...

Just saying.


message 4: by G.T. (new)

G.T. Trickle (goodreadscomgttrickle) Willow wrote: "I know that we are supposed to take bad reviews in stride and not respond to them. I intend to follow that advice. But, this is my debut novel, and my first review. It was rated 2.0. Ouch!

As an i..."


Your novel is like a new baby. Parents think their baby is most adorable, cutest, etc., etc. Not every reader is going to find your novel outstanding and give it a stellar review. However, if you're able to read a review, pay attention to what the reader is telling you. Are they pointing out flaws in character development, story flow, etc. using their own words. I'm lucky because I've had an opportunity to interact with many readers of my novel Juror 1389: Dorsie Raines Renninger by being a speaking guest at book club meetings. These are savvy readers and hold nothing back in their comments or questions. I listen carefully to what they have to say. Often their questions sometimes give me a clue to what I need to work on or do better the next time around. If I got a two star review on Amazon or here, I'd take note but it wouldn't destroy my confidence in my writing skill and ability to tell a story. Why? Again, I'm lucky that I have face-to-face interaction with readers and not one has said "I was disappointed. I expected something other than what it was."


message 5: by K. (new)

K. Jarrait (KAnneJarrait) | 6 comments I just published my very first book as well. I have had the obligatory 5 star ratings from family and friends, and I say obligatory because that's generally what family and friends do...give you the highest ratings to support you.
But I have got some 3 star reviews. I know that 1 star and 2 stars are only moments away. It's the nature of the business. And I thought with the 3 star that I would be upset, because it is like our own little baby and we want everyone to love it just as we love it. But I actually feel that I got more from the lower star rating than I did from the obligatory exceptional reviews. The lower ratings help you to grow. They won't always be forthcoming, you have to read in between the lines sometimes, but they will give you more to walk away with, more ways to become even better than the glorious reviews of a 4 or 5 star, and even sometimes a 3 star.


message 6: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (GGAtcheson) | 491 comments Why should you stop doing what you love because of ONE bad review? I know it's hard, but forget about it. Write more...practice makes perfect and it helps keep your mind of that one review.


message 7: by Jason (new)

Jason Crawford (JasonPatrickCrawford) | 62 comments Willow wrote: "Jason wrote: "Especially if the hissy-fit includes stalking...

Just saying."

Um... No hissy fit or stalking... Just wondering if I should keep writing."


Of course. No implications or assumptions meant. Yes, if you enjoy writing, you should keep writing.


message 8: by Lady Echo (new)

Lady Echo (LadyEcho) | 38 comments The only one and two star reviews that will significantly damage sales are those that say the writing is unprofessional, full of typos or grammatical errors. BTW I checked out your book. The review isn't what put me off. Your reader was pretty fair in her criticism.


message 9: by Brittney (new)

Brittney Porterfield | 15 comments I review books pretty frequently. I wanted you to know that I don't even look at ratings when selecting a book. I have found that I like books that others don't and I don't like books others do. I want to read a book and make up my own mind. I'm sure if I am this way then there are others like me.


message 10: by Gideon (new)

Gideon Asche (GideonAsche) | 29 comments Lady Echo wrote: "The only one and two star reviews that will significantly damage sales are those that say the writing is unprofessional, full of typos or grammatical errors. BTW I checked out your book. The review..."


My favorite review started with the words..

"this author is one illiterate SOB... "

He went on to write several paragraphs saying it made no difference and gave me 5 stars.


message 11: by Gideon (new)

Gideon Asche (GideonAsche) | 29 comments Jason wrote: "Willow wrote: "Jason wrote: "Especially if the hissy-fit includes stalking...

Just saying."

Um... No hissy fit or stalking... Just wondering if I should keep writing."

Of course. No implications..."




KEEP WRITING..


message 12: by Lady Echo (new)

Lady Echo (LadyEcho) | 38 comments A lot of people don't care about typos and technical errors, but those that do will sometimes check reviews to make sure they aren't walking into a literary mess.


message 13: by Daniel (new)

Daniel (Misterwrite) | 25 comments Although this is not exactly on-topic, I have a policy in regards to giving reviews. If I consider a book of low-enough quality to give it a 1- or 2-star review, instead I contact the author and tell them that I don't want to drive their rating down. Then, I let them know what I found wrong with the book (grammar, content, continuity, etc.), with the stipulation that this is just opinion.

Being an independent author, I'd rather be given the opportunity to fix mistakes than get pummeled with bad reviews.


message 14: by Lady Echo (new)

Lady Echo (LadyEcho) | 38 comments That's understandable, Daniel, but publishing a book should mean the work is ready for buyers. I wouldn't open a restaurant and serve raw meat because I hadn't figured out how to cook it yet. Customers are not supposed to be paying to finalize the product.

If the book isn't to professional standards, it shouldn't be released. Period.


message 15: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) Daniel wrote: "Although this is not exactly on-topic, I have a policy in regards to giving reviews. If I consider a book of low-enough quality to give it a 1- or 2-star review, instead I contact the author and te..."

The problem with this is that if the author doesn't care, and doesn't fix the book, some unsuspecting reader might buy the thing and get a bad image of self-published authors. Pummeling a bad author with bad reviews may be the only way to get the book taken down and fixed.


message 16: by Paganalexandria (last edited Nov 20, 2014 10:05AM) (new)

Paganalexandria Willow wrote: "I know that we are supposed to take bad reviews in stride and not respond to them. I intend to follow that advice. But, this is my debut novel, and my first review. It was rated 2.0. Ouch!

As an i..."


Willow, as a reader, this might help you take low reviews a little better. When a book has snagged my attention, no one I trust has reviewed it yet, it's the low reviews that usually sway me to take a chance, not the high ones. I automatically sort them lowest to greatest while in research mode. If the blurb is appealing, and none of the cons are my deal breakers, then it gets added to my read list. Way more "bad reviews", have gotten me to take a chance, than the glowing ones.


message 17: by Daniel (new)

Daniel (Misterwrite) | 25 comments Ken wrote: "Daniel wrote: "Although this is not exactly on-topic, I have a policy in regards to giving reviews. If I consider a book of low-enough quality to give it a 1- or 2-star review, instead I contact th..."

Good point. I guess I'm a little too timid when it comes to giving criticism in a public arena.


message 18: by Lady Echo (new)

Lady Echo (LadyEcho) | 38 comments Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "If the blurb is appealing, and none of the cons are my deal breakers, then it gets added to my read list. Way more "bad reviews", have gotten me to take a chance, than the glowing ones..."

Agreed


message 19: by Gideon (new)

Gideon Asche (GideonAsche) | 29 comments Daniel wrote: "Although this is not exactly on-topic, I have a policy in regards to giving reviews. If I consider a book of low-enough quality to give it a 1- or 2-star review, instead I contact the author and te..."

very kool way to handle it.


message 20: by Steven (new)

Steven (TBones) | 408 comments It's extremely rare that I read a book that gets this low of a star rating and if I feel the book is going that low and know it's going to hurt the author's sales, I usually don't rate it and send a private message to them about what didn't work for me with it. Unfortunately not every reader is this nice and they are going to put these reviews up so I say if your are a passionate writer, listen to Keith's advise. Keep at it. Even authors like Stephen King have people that rate their work like this. There are audiences for so many types of stories. The only thing I would stress, is having a really good editing/proofreading group. Get as many typos and as I call them, hickups, out of your book as you can. Make your story flow. Remember don't just tell a story...show it.


message 21: by Yzabel (new)

Yzabel Ginsberg (yzabelginsberg) | 262 comments Uh, yeah, as a reader, I definitely like to know what I'm getting into when I buy a book... I can understand not wanting to hurt the author, but let's not forget reviews on sites like GR are primarily for the readers, not for authors to improve. Of course, authors can take reviews into account and use them to improve when writing their next books, but that's all. Readers =/= beta-readers.

Too many people already consider indie/self-publishing as problematic and don't want to touch such books because in their minds, said books just can't be up to professional standards. So, if on top of this reviewers don't mention when novels indeed fail to meet minimum standards, if they refrain from posting "bad" reviews, this will only reinforce those assumptions.

Willow: Sorry if my wording was a bit ambiguous. ^^; I never meant to imply you were throwing a hissy fit; I was just stating what IMHO really hurts authors/sales in general, based on recent and less recent tantrums seen on GR and the web in general.


message 22: by Jim (last edited Nov 20, 2014 10:37AM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 760 comments Authors' obsession with reviews is an anomaly that can be easily traced to the independent/self-publishing renaissance brought about by the availability of the personal computer and internet. Traditionally published authors seldom, if ever, comment on reviews. Most probably pay them little or no attention.

Reviews are nothing more than a reader's opinion of a particular book, based upon their personal preferences in writing style, storyline, lifestyle, etc. It is important to remember that readers write reviews for other readers, not authors. They are not a judgement of the author as a person, so don't take it personally.

Soliciting, trading, and/or purchasing reviews is unnecessary. Write a book worth reading and some people will eventually read it. A few of them will rate and/or review it.


message 23: by Daniel (new)

Daniel (Misterwrite) | 25 comments I actually don't mind a low rating as long as the reader gives constructive criticism or a reason WHY. My first book is a collection of horror short stories. One 2-star review complained that "the first story was too long. I didn't get any farther than that."

It took a colossal effort not to reply with "Perhaps Dr. Seuss is more your speed." Too long? What about the story, the characters, the plot? Too long isn't good enough reason to give a book with four stories, three of which you never read, a two-star rating.

Sorry, rant over. My point is, any low rating should be accompanied with a justification. I take that into consideration when looking into a book I want to buy.


message 24: by Steven (new)

Steven (TBones) | 408 comments I totally agree Daniel and I got a chuckle out of your rant :o) I personally don't mind a long short story. As long as it has a great plot with really fun interaction between the characters, sometimes I get sad if the story is so good that it wasn't longer :o)


message 25: by Lady Echo (new)

Lady Echo (LadyEcho) | 38 comments Objection!

"Any low rating should be accompanied with a justification"?

Um. NO. Sorry. But NO! It isn't the job of a paying reader to provide you with feedback.


message 26: by Noorilhuda (last edited Nov 21, 2014 05:41AM) (new)

Noorilhuda | 87 comments On Day One, after the unplanned release of my debut e-novel The Governess, I sent a single email to selected ones from Amazon Top 1000 Reviewers - some of them responded angrily saying I had spammed them (!) and posted 1-star 'review' as punishment for approaching them in the first place. This happened on Day Two of releasing the book itself. Carpet-bombing of some sort.

Day Three, a complete stranger, sci-fi writer John R. Patin wrote a few words of encouragement on a community discussion board at Amazon. (I just looked him up on GR). He wrote:

"Noori, being a Science Fiction fan and writer and not much into romances, I can only speculate that you may have found a way off the beaten path into new territory. You may be onto something that will pull in fans tired of the same old, same old. Even your promotion above has a different (and daring) approach. Best of luck with your book......An aside... I note that you got a couple of unfavorable 'reviews' because someone was annoyed with something you did. 'Spam' a review? What are they talking about? Anyway, whatever their beef, don't let them get you down. It is obvious they did not read your book and therefore their 'reviews' are invalid. Ignore them. In time their squawks will be drowned by the good reviews your book will no doubt garner. Again, good luck! :>"

It was extremely generous and sweet of the author to boost another author - not through a fake review, or fake praise, but genuine respect and empathy. God Bless Him.

Generally readers who have bought the e-novel and bloggers who have reviewed it - till now - have liked / loved it (4-5 stars). Yes, some of the readers have not liked it and one of them has even rated it as 1-star but I like the fact that they formed an opinion after reading it!

You have to develop a thick skin Willow! All the best!

The Governess by Noorilhuda by Noorilhuda


message 27: by Marylee (last edited Nov 20, 2014 10:48AM) (new)

Marylee MacDonald (Marylee_MacDonald) | 5 comments Great discussion about the ratings. A few weeks ago, Alice Munro's collected stories came out. She got some two star reviews, and she just won the Nobel Prize. I've read some reviews of Donna Tartt's novel, THE GOLDFINCH. They weren't glowing either, and they brought down her overall rating. That book is one I copied passages from in order to study what she was doing. I have a first novel out, too, and the first few days while I waited for reviews to come in, I was almost hyperventilating. Then I thought of something I heard the amazing teacher and writer Ron Carlson say. "Step over it." He lifted his foot to demonstrate. I guess the message is "don't stop writing." Not that we could. We writers don't have anything else we'd rather be doing. Good luck and wait for the glowing reviews to fill the empty space in your stomach. You will enjoy them all the more.


message 28: by Daniel (new)

Daniel (Misterwrite) | 25 comments Lady Echo wrote: "Objection!

"Any low rating should be accompanied with a justification"?

Um. NO. Sorry. But NO! It isn't the job of a paying reader to provide you with feedback."


It is not for the benefit of the author so much as other potential readers. There are many people who give a book (or movie, music, etc.) for reasons that have nothing to do with content. Popularity backlash, prejudices (a character is gay, or black, or female), personal grudges. I could go on and on.

When I see a book with multiple 1- and 2-star ratings, I assume the book is bad. A little digging, and I discover that the few who leave reviews did so because "I heard this book sucked!" or similar.


message 29: by Paganalexandria (last edited Nov 20, 2014 01:01PM) (new)

Paganalexandria Daniel wrote: "It is not for the benefit of the author so much as other potential readers. There are many people who give a book (or movie, music, etc.) for reasons that have nothing to do with content. Popularity backlash, prejudices (a character is gay, or black, or female), personal grudges. I could go on and on.

When I see a book with multiple 1- and 2-star ratings, I assume the book is bad. A little digging, and I discover that the few who leave reviews did so because "I heard this book sucked!" or similar. "


Daniel sometimes it's a kindness just rating versus the breakdown. I have seen way too many Goodreads train wrecks brought on by an author contacting a rater, to "explain" the low star. Some Goodreaders' version of polite, is rating only, instead of the "only good reviews" practice. Especially those who like to track everything read. Knowing most people disregard the blank ratings, still unsure why sensitive writers would prefer the bullet point explanation of "why this book is horrible to me..." Granted I personally chose books to read from the rants, but I'm not going to be tempted to argue the points, unlike an author.


message 30: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) Willow wrote: "I know that we are supposed to take bad reviews in stride and not respond to them. I intend to follow that advice. But, this is my debut novel, and my first review. It was rated 2.0. Ouch!

As an i..."


Reviews are opinions, nothing more. Perhaps your book was just not this reader's cup of tea. It is unrealistic to presume that everyone will adore your work.


message 31: by Sadie (new)

Sadie Forsythe | 68 comments Re: sending private messages to authors rather than posting a public review.

Perhaps I am in the minority, but I would be far more devastated by a stranger emailing me personally to tell me what was wrong with my book than their posting even the most vitriolic public and therefore impersonal review. No, I would much rather a negative review get posted than an email sent.

But there is also a certain assumption that goes into this, and that is that as another author you are treating my book differently than a big house published book. You wouldn't email Anne Rice or Stephen King with criticisms, you'd post a review if you had something to say. Part of what gives SP/Indie books a bad name is the reading public's assumption that bad reviews are getting scuttled. I wouldn't want my book to be part of that. I want to think whomever reads it, if they like it or not, feels free to review it as they please with no consideration for me or my feelings.


message 32: by Sam (new)

Sam Kates | 53 comments Well said, Sadie. I'm with you.

One of my favourite reviews of my most recent release is a 2-star. The reader said some positive things before saying that she had a hard time enjoying a story about the near-extinction of the human race (it's apocalyptic science fiction). Great, I thought, it's doing what I want it to do.

Much better in my opinion that she posted a review rather than sending me a private message. And the same goes for the more negative reviews - shows the book isn't just being read by people who know me.


message 33: by Brandon (last edited Nov 20, 2014 01:05PM) (new)

Brandon Varnell You learn more from negative reviews than you do from positive reviews anyway. If everyone told you that your story was awesome, you'd never progress.

One of my first reviews was actually a 2-star, and it basically told me my story sucked and my "Charictars" were flat, and yes, that is the spelling my reviewer used for characters. About a week after I actually received my first and only 1-star review, which basically said my story smacks of fanfiction cliche's. I don't know what a fanfiction cliche is, so I can't determine that, but that review did actually have some useful critique that I was able to get out of it.


message 34: by G.T. (new)

G.T. Trickle (goodreadscomgttrickle) Lady Echo wrote: "That's understandable, Daniel, but publishing a book should mean the work is ready for buyers. I wouldn't open a restaurant and serve raw meat because I hadn't figured out how to cook it yet. Custo..."

Ah, but -- self-publishing has made it soo easy for wanna-be-something-I-think-I'll-try-writing and the marginal graduates who didn't "get it" in English classes to throw together a "story" and hit the publish button.

When I first got my Kindle and I was trying it out to see if I liked it, I downloaded some $.99 material. Frankly, I was horrified at the sub-standard writing I was reading. Now, through the Lock Inside function on Amazon I can usually tell the skill level a writer within three pages. If those pages aren't top notch, I don't buy, even at $.99.


message 35: by Yzabel (new)

Yzabel Ginsberg (yzabelginsberg) | 262 comments Daniel wrote: "It is not for the benefit of the author so much as other potential readers. There are many people who give a book (or movie, music, etc.) for reasons that have nothing to do with content. Popularity backlash, prejudices (a character is gay, or black, or female), personal grudges. I could go on and on.

When I see a book with multiple 1- and 2-star ratings, I assume the book is bad. A little digging, and I discover that the few who leave reviews did so because "I heard this book sucked!" or similar. "


That's why I usually don't pay much attention to ratings only. They're statistics, nothing else. Readers who're genuinely interested in a book will usually dig a little deeper anyway.

Still, I don't like the idea of demanding that reviewers always explain their ratings. As far as I'm concerned, I try to leave reviews, but sometimes, I just don't have time. Or I'm tired. Or I'm on lunch break at work and forget to go back to it later. Or I don't care about giving one more minute of my time to a book because it was just so bad, and finishing it was already effort enough. I assume other people behave the same way for similar reasons.

Is it fair to the author or even other reviewers? Nope, and it sucks, I know. But it's my reading & my reviewing time, so I can do what I want with it. If others want to do the same, I have no right to demand detailed reviews (whether I post some myself or not).


message 36: by Jim (last edited Nov 20, 2014 01:52PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 760 comments G.T. wrote: "Lady Echo wrote: "That's understandable, Daniel, but publishing a book should mean the work is ready for buyers. I wouldn't open a restaurant and serve raw meat because I hadn't figured out how to ..."

G.T.,

You have stated the obvious primary reason for so many 1-star ratings and negative reviews today. I applaud your willingness to say what many feel, but fear they may hurt some authors' feelings or make them angry.

Not so very long ago, published author was a title and accomplishment few ever earned. Today, anyone with access to a personal computer and the internet can now technically claim the title without actually earning it.


CD {Boulder Blvd} (BoulderBlvd) | 23 comments I totally agree with G.T. and Jim about some of the self published authors. I am very dependent on previewing the book first to ensure a certain level of writing. The sad part of the self publishing world is that it’s so easy to self publish that there are a lot of less than stellar writers which then gives the self publishing world a less than professional image.

The role of the reviewer can help to distinguish the differences between the authors, which is why it is important to rate books according to their worth and not give away stars or shy away from giving a low star rating.


message 38: by Theresa (new)

Theresa (Theresa99) | 433 comments Willow wrote: "I know that we are supposed to take bad reviews in stride and not respond to them. I intend to follow that advice. But, this is my debut novel, and my first review. It was rated 2.0. Ouch!

As an i..."


Hi Willow. It is hard to get mediocre or bad reviews. I checked out yours and I see it was someone who received a copy for a review. Many reviewers recruited like this will see it as their job to give you an honest review. It seemed as if that particular reader did not connect with your characters and had a few other issues with the book. As someone else said, learn from it. There's no pleasing everyone.

My most scathing in-person review probably came from Mom. (She probably would have said her piece in a review if she was more technically savvy.) I think it'll probably be more painful than any 1 star reviews I get. She had solid points about the characters and events, but it stung like a horde of hornets on me. However, her points gave me good things to look out for when I revise and edit the next books in the series.


message 39: by Steven (new)

Steven (TBones) | 408 comments Sadie wrote: "Re: sending private messages to authors rather than posting a public review.

Perhaps I am in the minority, but I would be far more devastated by a stranger emailing me personally to tell me what
..."


Actually, I would definitely send a message to Anne Rice or Stephen King and have sent one to Dean Koontz


message 40: by Sadie (new)

Sadie Forsythe | 68 comments Steven wrote: "Actually, I would definitely send a message to Anne Rice or Stephen King and have sent one to Dean Koontz "

I definitely envy your chutzpah then!


message 41: by Groovy (last edited Nov 20, 2014 02:52PM) (new)

Groovy Lee I agree with most of these comments. It hurts. You want everyone to be as excited about your stories as you are. And you hope others won't let one and two star reviews be the deciding factor in whether or not they want to give your book a chance. But I'd like to address those one and two star reviews that has nothing whatsoever to do with the book. For instance:

I received a spiteful one star review because the reader hated the first word in the title--that I said 'cause' and not because. That's it. She didn't even read the book. She just likes giving out one star reviews apparently, "because" I'm not the only author she did this to. I was so afraid that buyers would see that and avoid me. But as I was advised, those with common sense will see it for the spitefulness it is and let my book speak for itself. (I now have a four star review--thankfully)

I got a one star review on one of romance novels because, wait for it, I didn't convince the reader that grandparents have rights regarding their grandchildren--again, that's it! I wanted to tell her that's why it's called fiction. It's a romance novel not the Bar exam. There are no such thing as Hobbits, or a Terminator either, but people still flock to see the movies about them.

I just wish that reviews are given on the basis of the book's content and not on triviality that could hurt your sales. It's so frustrating!


message 42: by Steven (new)

Steven (TBones) | 408 comments Sadie wrote: "Re: sending private messages to authors rather than posting a public review.

Perhaps I am in the minority, but I would be far more devastated by a stranger emailing me personally to tell me what
..."


Actually, I would definitely send a message to Anne Rice or Stephen King and have sent one to Dean Koontz


message 43: by Steven (new)

Steven (TBones) | 408 comments I do this, especially for the authors that have offered their title to me for free, for a review. I post my reviews all over, on Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, LibraryThing, Twitter, Facebook, and Net Galley. So I would think it extremely damaging if I posted 1& 2 star reviews after being given the opportunity to read an author's work...Especially a new author.


message 44: by Lady Echo (new)

Lady Echo (LadyEcho) | 38 comments I wouldn't send a message to Anne Rice or Stephen King and here's why:

They are professional authors who demand compensation for their products. As a consumer, I am entitled to review those products publicly in an honest manner so that I might provide a warning or recommendation for other readers like myself.

Sending a private message in lieu of a public review is a consideration I won't make if I was given no warning that the content might not be of professional standard before I put out the money.


CD {Boulder Blvd} (BoulderBlvd) | 23 comments As a reviewer it’s tough leaving anything less than a 3 star review; but then what’s the purpose of a rating system if only good reviews will be left? As someone else mentioned reviews are for readers, not authors and they depend on the honesty of the reviewer to determine where to spend their money.


message 46: by Jim (last edited Nov 20, 2014 06:16PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 760 comments Authors such as Stephen King, Dean Koontz, and Anne Rice are professionals who earn a comfortable living writing novels. The word professionals and the phrase earn a comfortable living are what sets them apart from the vast majority of self-published and independent authors.

I have never read of a traditional author fretting over any partcular reader's negative review of one of their books. Probably because such reviews have no significant impact on their overall sales.


message 47: by Groovy (last edited Nov 20, 2014 06:16PM) (new)

Groovy Lee CD wrote: "As a reviewer it’s tough leaving anything less than a 3 star review; but then what’s the purpose of a rating system if only good reviews will be left? As someone else mentioned reviews are for read..."

I agree on the one hand, but I also I think reviews are for both readers and authors. I'm not against one and two star reviews that are constructive. They can help show you to where you need to improve. And I find that some reviewers don't mind telling you where you need to improve or if your grammar needs work.

I've learned so much from some negative reviews I've gotten (thank you) And they weren't because they didn't like the story, it was because I would make mistakes when it came to tense. Now, I focus on that to make sure I don't repeat it. Although, I still find myself doing it.

As I said earlier, I don't like one and two star reviews based solely on some dislike that has nothing to do with the content of the book.


CD {Boulder Blvd} (BoulderBlvd) | 23 comments Readers are looking for content in the review. They want to know what makes this a good read or what keeps it from being a good read. I think readers ignore or sometimes even get irritated with the catty reviewers.


message 49: by Jim (last edited Nov 20, 2014 06:34PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 760 comments Again, readers rate and review books to let other readers, not authors, know what they thought of the book.

It is an editor's job to point out technical and conceptual problems in a manuscript so that the author may make the necessary corrections and improvements before the book is published.


Sarah (Presto agitato) (mg2001) | 92 comments Jim wrote: "Authors such as Stephen King, Dean Koontz, and Anne Rice are professionals who earn a comfortable living writing novels. The word professionals and the phrase earn a comfortable living are what sets them apart from the vast majority of self-published and independent authors.

I have never read of a traditional author fretting over any partcular reader's negative review of one of their books. Probably because such reviews have no significant impact on their overall sales."


They're out there. Anne Rice actually being one famous example. And of course there is the more recent Kathleen Hale stalking debacle. She is traditionally published.


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