Kindle British Mystery Book Club discussion

Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death (The Grantchester Mysteries #1)
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Book Club Selection > November 2014 Group Read - Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death by James Runcie

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David Gooch | 4044 comments Mod
Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death by James Runcie

"It is 1953, the coronation year of Queen Elizabeth II . Sidney Chambers, vicar of Grantchester and honorary canon of Ely Cathedral, is a thirty-two-year-old bachelor. Tall, with dark brown hair, eyes the color of hazelnuts, and a reassuringly gentle manner, Sidney is an unconventional clerical detective. He can go where the police cannot.

Together with his roguish friend, inspector Geordie Keating, Sidney inquires into the suspect suicide of a Cambridge solicitor, a scandalous jewelry theft at a New Year’s Eve dinner party, the unexplained death of a jazz promoter’s daughter, and a shocking art forgery that puts a close friend in danger. Sidney discovers that being a detective, like being a clergyman, means that you are never off duty, but he nonetheless manages to find time for a keen interest in cricket, warm beer, and hot jazz—as well as a curious fondness for a German widow three years his junior."

Discussion Leader - David Gooch


David Gooch | 4044 comments Mod
Ok I chose this as my nomination as it has recently appeared on ITV as a series called "Grantchester" and I thought it might be good to see how close the TV series is to the book etc. and I also believed it might be an interesting read.

For information the author James Runcie has a webpage at
http://www.jamesruncie.com/index.aspx

ITV info on series Grantchester at
http://www.itv.com/presscentre/press-...


message 3: by Louise (new)

Louise Mabille | 12 comments Sounds fun!


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
P3 'manifold sins & wickedness' - from the General Confession in the Book of Common Prayer.


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
P3 'manifold sins & wickedness' - from the General Confession in the Book of Common Prayer.


message 6: by Cristal (new) - added it

Cristal Punnett I've read the first couple of stories, which are great fun, short enough to keep me interested.


Ruth BBC Radio 4 Extra are serialising this at the moment. I've just listened to the first episode - very enjoyable.


David Gooch | 4044 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "BBC Radio 4 Extra are serialising this at the moment. I've just listened to the first episode - very enjoyable."

Nice to know Sarah.

I have my copy now and will be starting it this week.


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
A quick glance @ wikipedia reveals the 1st Tupperware party in England wasn't till 1960. Good historicals are so hard to do.


message 10: by Ruth (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ruth Bill wrote: "A quick glance @ wikipedia reveals the 1st Tupperware party in England wasn't till 1960. Good historicals are so hard to do."

I wonder if he read the passage about the Tupperware Party being a good way for women of the 1950s to work and enjoy the benefits of earning an income, without reading on to the mention of it not coming to this this country until 1960.


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "Bill wrote: "A quick glance @ wikipedia reveals the 1st Tupperware party in England wasn't till 1960. Good historicals are so hard to do."

I wonder if he read the passage about the Tupperware Part..."


Actually I did but why do you ask?


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
I'm DNF on this one after one story. Reasons on the spoiler thread.


AngryGreyCat (angrygreycatreads) | 554 comments I just got this from the library so might start it tonight or tomorrow


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
On reflection, I think this one should adapt beautifilly to television, especially with the lovely settings.


message 15: by Ruth (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ruth Bill wrote: "I wonder if he read the passage about the Tupperware Part..."

Actually I did but why do you ask?


Sorry, I meant I wonder if the author read the first part of the Wikipedia entry about Tupperware in the 1950s in America but didn't spot that later on it mentioned that Tupperware didn't arrive in the UK til 1960.


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Bill Kupersmith | 580 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "Bill wrote: "I wonder if he read the passage about the Tupperware Part..."

Actually I did but why do you ask?

Sorry, I meant I wonder if the author read the first part of the Wikipedia entry abou..."


Thanks. These things are tricky. Now that DNA analysis, CCTV cameras, & mobile phones have made so many traditional plot elements obsolete, detective story authors have been drawn increasingly to historicals & as we fossils who can actually remember the '50s shuffle off this mortal coil fewer anachronisms will be noticed. It's the little things we take for granted that sneak (& when will the 1st supposed '50s character say 'snuck'?) in, not obvious anachronisms like laptops. I've spotted @ least 4 stories set in the '20s,'30s & '40s with married Englishmen wearing wedding bands. Not too long ago one of the members of our group was surprised to discover that men's shirts used to have detachable collars (which I gather are making a come-back thanks to Downton Abbey).


David Gooch | 4044 comments Mod
Right I have done the first two stories within the book which as it happens coincide with the first two episodes of the TV series Grantchester based on the books.

Have to say that allowing for TV drama and looking for effect maybe that the stories are pretty much as they were on the TV.


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