Book Riot's Read Harder Challenge discussion

1349 views
2019 Read Harder Challenge > Task #24: A collection of poetry published since 2014

Comments Showing 1-50 of 96 (96 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Book Riot (new)

Book Riot Community (book_riot) | 430 comments Mod
Use this space to discuss books you're reading or that might fit the 24th Read Harder task.


message 2: by Serendipity (new)

Serendipity | 21 comments I really enjoyed Rupi Kaur's Milk and Honey which I read this year. So my pick for 2019 will be The Sun and her Flowers.


message 3: by Kimberley (new)

Kimberley (kimirons) | 30 comments I’ve put Kumukanda by Kayombo Chingonyi on hold at the library. It also works for #3 as an aoc that won a literary award in 2018


message 4: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Harbeke First pick: New Poets of Native Nations

Backup: If They Come For Us


message 5: by Chrissy (new)

Chrissy | 88 comments I really enjoyed Electric Arches!


message 6: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa | 6 comments Shame Is an Ocean I Swim Across: Poems by Mary Lambert is one I'm looking forward do, especially interesting as she's a local artist.


message 7: by Brittany (new)

Brittany Morrison | 61 comments I bought To Make Monsters Out of Girls a couple of days ago. I guess I can hold off a couple of weeks to read it.


message 8: by Tabitha (new)

Tabitha D (windmillstilt) | 49 comments For the Poetry published since 2014 I've chosen blud by Rachel McKibbens after having learned about her work during this recent poetry plagiarism scandal. There's some other poets whose works were plagiarised as well such as Jeanann Verlee, Hieu Minh Nguyen, Amber Tamblyn, and many more(at last count it was 14 poets they'd stolen from but sadly I don't have a list of names. . . these are just ones I recall besides McKibbens).

I also recommend checking out Rupi Kaur. I read both Milk and Honey, and the Sun and Her Flowers this year by her and enjoyed them both.


message 10: by Tracy (last edited Dec 19, 2018 05:39AM) (new)

Tracy (tracyisreading) | 9 comments I don't read poetry but I did read both of Rupi Kaurs books this year and enjoyed them ( though they were a little emotional in places)

I looked at the GR choice awards and saw Heart Talk: Poetic Wisdom for a Better Life so I may try and get to that just to check it out.

I also have The Princess Saves Herself in This One, The Poet X, and Long Way Down on my TBR for next year.
Maybe I'll just have one day where I read all of the poetry on my lists?

There are also a few middle grades written in verse on my challenges.


The2CarolinesAndBooks | 11 comments I almost feel bad about tripling-up on Tasks, but I have chosen to read In the House of My Father. This poetry collection also works for Task #3: A book by a woman and/or AOC (Author of Color) that won a literary award in 2018 (Brunel International African Poetry Prize) as well as Task #9: A book published prior to January 1, 2019, with fewer than 100 reviews on Goodreads.


message 12: by Mandi (new)

Mandi Thomas (themandithomas) | 23 comments I'll probably read some Amanda Lovelace since I've been meaning to check her out.

Others I'd like to read are Depression & Other Magic Tricks,Unveiled, Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart, and If They Come for Us.

The Princess Saves Herself in This One (Women Are Some Kind of Magic, #1) by Amanda Lovelace To Make Monsters Out of Girls (Things that Haunt, #1) by Amanda Lovelace Depression & Other Magic Tricks by Sabrina Benaim Unveiled by Rumki Chowdhury Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart by Alice Walker If They Come for Us by Fatimah Asghar


message 13: by Catie (new)

Catie (catieohjoy) | 35 comments I've loved reading Tracy K. Smith's work, as well as listening to her read poems by other poets on her podcast The Slowdown. But I haven't picked up her newest collection (published April '18) yet, so I'll read Wade in the Water: Poems for this task.

Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals by Patricia Lockwood was published in 2014, and I especially recommend it for anyone who has read and enjoyed her memoir (Priestdaddy: A Memoir) but hasn't checked out her poetry yet!

Wade in the Water Poems by Tracy K. Smith Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals by Patricia Lockwood


message 14: by Karen (new)

Karen Witzler (kewitzler) | 133 comments Like: Poems by A.E. Stallings is my pick.


message 15: by Stina (new)

Stina (stinalyn) | 177 comments I'll be reading 2015 Battle of the Bards Poetry Contest: Winning Entries. It's available for free download on the library's website, and my friend Tara has two poems in it.


message 16: by Therese (new)

Therese | 30 comments Seluxes wrote: "I'll be reading Dorianne Laux's newest that releases in mid-January. I read a lot of poetry (mostly contemporary narrative-focused collections), if anyone would like some recs, I have some."

I have never gotten into poetry and don't read it unless I "have to." Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated, especially inexpensive ones. I read on my Kindle. Thanks.


message 17: by Therese (new)

Therese | 30 comments Serendipity wrote: "I really enjoyed Rupi Kaur's Milk and Honey which I read this year. So my pick for 2019 will be The Sun and her Flowers."

I just checked on Amazon and it is free for prime members. Thank you.


message 18: by Hope (new)

Hope I recommend Sea of Strangers I am not a big poetry fan but I loved it!


message 19: by Hope (new)

Hope I also highly recommend The New Nudity. I went to a poetry reading by this writer at my university and it was brilliance!


message 20: by Teresa (new)

Teresa | 356 comments I'm not into poetry so I hope I'll enjoy Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty.


message 21: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinreve) | 3 comments Does the Poet X count as a collection of Poetry?


message 22: by Jean (new)

Jean | 6 comments I'm not a fan of poetry. I'd prefer a collection of many poets work than only one poet.

I think I will read this: American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time


message 23: by rae (last edited Dec 27, 2018 02:35PM) (new)

rae (inkwashesout) | 39 comments there's so much amazing new poetry! you really don't have to resort to rupi kaur. here are a few of my favorites. and you can google them and check them out on poetry foundation to get a feel for their poetry to see if it's up your alley or not.

i second the recommendation for Chen Chen's When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities.

Warsan Shire, teaching my mother how to give birth - made famous when Beyonce used her poetry in Lemonade - short chapbook, quick read

Patrick Rosal, Brooklyn Antediluvian (also counts for #9) - Filipino American poet, wrote one of my favorite poems ever: "you cannot go to the god you love with your two legs"

I absolutely love Ocean Vuong's night sky with exit wounds. from "essay on craft": "So I gathered fistfuls // of ash, dark as ink, // hammered them // into marrow, into // a skull thick // enough to keep // the gentle curse"

Joshua Jennifer Espinoza, There Should Be Flowers (also counts for #9) - sad queer latinx trans girl poetry and i'm so here for it!

danez smith, Don't Call Us Dead - brilliant queer black poet writing about everything from police violence to seroconversion

kai cheng thom, a place called no homeland (also counts for #9) - kai cheng thom is a trans femme poet and performance artist who writes about queerness, community, diaspora, and gender. from "autopsky": "dear scientist, mortuary explorer, search me thoroughly // tenderly catalogue all my wayward parts. // find somewhere in me // the forgotten moon, the faded stars. // re-member, reassemble, this tattered heaven, this // shattered // celestial thing."

Molly McCully Brown, The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded (also counts for #9) - poetry by a disabled woman who grew up in the shadow of the Virginia institution notorious for eugenics, imagining life in that institution - check out "Self Portrait as the Other Girl"

and here a few more that are more academic and theoretical, and have challenged me more:

Layli Long Soldier, Whereas - on indigeneity, official government speech, and literary imaginings

Solmaz Sharif, Look - on war and its consequences - uses and redeploys official military language

Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Spill Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity (also counts for #9) - beautiful, evocative black queer feminist theory through poetry, inspired by Hortense Spillers


message 24: by Karin (new)

Karin (8littlepaws) | 118 comments Catie wrote: "I've loved reading Tracy K. Smith's work, as well as listening to her read poems by other poets on her podcast The Slowdown. But I haven't picked up her newest collection (published..."

Oh, thank you for reminding me I've been wanting to read the Lockwood collection! Absolutely loved Priestdaddy.


message 25: by Heather (new)

Heather (heather1212) | 6 comments Nadine wrote: "I LOVED When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities by Chen Chen and I highly recommend it!!"

Thank you for the recommendation of Chen Chen, Nadine. I'm going to read this one.


message 26: by Fran (new)

Fran (fran_g-s) | 15 comments How do I link a book title and/or author. I’m on an iPhone, btw. TIA!


message 27: by Serendipity (new)

Serendipity | 21 comments Fran, I'm pretty sure you can't do links on a mobile device.


message 28: by Ann (new)

Ann Contella (ahnsolo) | 21 comments Too bad Throw the Damn Ball: Classic Poetry by Dogs was published in 2013. I'm not a poetry fan, but I might have enjoyed this!


message 29: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth (elizabethlk) | 208 comments I read a few dozen contemporary poetry collections in 2018, and I'm glad this is giving me the chance to keep going. I have several checked out of the library right now that would count for this task, and I'm just going to count whichever one I get to first.

Right now it's a toss-up between:
Even This Page is White by Vivek Shraya
Passage by Gwen Benaway
Calling Down the Sky by Rosanna Deerchild
Trailer Park Elegy by Cornelia Hoogland
If They Come For Us by Fatimah Asghar.


message 30: by Fran (last edited Jan 01, 2019 06:05PM) (new)

Fran (fran_g-s) | 15 comments Christine E. Ray's book Composition of a Woman is spectacular - published in 2018. And, right now it only has 11 reviews, if you like to knock our more than one category with a single book!


message 31: by Lauraellen (new)

Lauraellen | 18 comments I have decided to start the year with The Carrying: Poems by Ada Limon but I'm planning to read more poetry this year in general so taking lots of notes here! So many great suggestions.


message 32: by Lauraellen (new)

Lauraellen | 18 comments I have decided to start the year with The Carrying: Poems by Ada Limon but I'm planning to read more poetry this year in general so taking lots of notes here! So many great suggestions.


message 33: by Lucia (new)

Lucia Kelly | 45 comments Hi there! I'm making lists of everyone's suggestions for the challenges in case that's easier for people (I know it is for me!) c:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...


message 34: by sofiazee (new)

sofiazee | 1 comments Lucia wrote: "Hi there! I'm making lists of everyone's suggestions for the challenges in case that's easier for people (I know it is for me!) c:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1..."


Thanks a lot!


message 35: by Kate (last edited Jan 03, 2019 06:21AM) (new)

Kate | 116 comments As soon as I saw this prompt, I knew I finally had a reason to pick up American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin. I don't usually go out of my way to choose poetry but I usually enjoy it, and I've heard wonderful things about Terrance Hayes.

ETA: For kids' poetry, I'd recommend Jabberwalking. It looks long but reads fast, and many poems rely on typeface to take up the whole page.


message 36: by Dawn (last edited Jan 03, 2019 07:41AM) (new)

Dawn (dawnb3) | 11 comments Milk and Honey is free on for Kindle with Amazon Prime. That's my choice.


message 37: by Megan (new)

Megan | 131 comments The Princess Saves Herself in This One

✅ done!
I really don’t like poetry. Thank God that task is over!


message 38: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie | 23 comments I plan to read Citizen: An American Lyric for this challenge.


message 39: by Luella (new)

Luella | 8 comments I looked at this list which had some interesting suggestions https://www.bustle.com/articles/19301...


message 40: by Bonnie G. (last edited Jan 18, 2019 04:55PM) (new)

Bonnie G. (narshkite) | 1353 comments I recommend Brown: Poems wholeheartedly, and I say that as someone who admires but rarely responds to poetry.


message 41: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 129 comments I struggle terribly with poetry. My non-creative brain just doesn't get it. But I'm optimistic that this collection has enough variety that even a poetry dunce like me will find something I understand. Fingers crossed! :) American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time


message 42: by ProfBen10 (new)

ProfBen10 | 50 comments I found something at the local library which covers this task and task #9: "Vivid: Notes and Poems about Color" by Julie Pasckis. Really looking forward to reading it!


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

I'll be reading the exceptional Carol Ann Duffy's "Sincerity". Love her work. And for those who haven't before, I recommend trying reading poetry aloud - I find an added level of experience comes from verbalisation and cadence and the music these poets create with their words and how they arrange them.


message 44: by Leslie Ann (new)

Leslie Ann (leslie_ann) | 151 comments I'm trying to fulfill these prompts with books for my Around-the-World Reading Challenge. So, I'm choosing Cape Verdean Blues.


message 45: by Marissa (new)

Marissa (stiricide) | 2 comments Excited to use this as the kick in the pants I've needed to read a book by my friend, Joanna Valente, either Marys of the Sea or Sexting Ghosts. These could also meet prompts 5 (Valente does double duty as a journalist), 9 (under 100 GR reviews), 13 (neurodiverse), and 18 (non-binary author).


message 46: by Erin (new)

Erin Perry Willis | 5 comments I would highly recommend Ellen Bass's book Like a Beggar. It was a 5 star read for me last year. Every one of her poems is a work of art. It was published in 2014...which I assume counts? And for those of you looking to double dip, I believe it currently has less than 100 reviews. If you visit her website (ellenbass.com) you can sample several poems from the book under the poems tab to see if you like her work before you commit.

I plan to read Good Bones by Maggie Smith, which is a book I already own but haven't finished. I purchased it after reading the title poem "Good Bones" online. A quick google search will allow you to read the poem and see if it's something you might enjoy.


message 47: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Hager (cheryl_is_reading) | 67 comments Dawn wrote: "Milk and Honey is free on for Kindle with Amazon Prime. That's my choice."

Mine too. I listened to the audio while reading along. Quite awesome and very emotional at times.


message 48: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Stoolfire | 38 comments the princess saves herself in this one by Amanda Lovelace - Ive been wanting to read al of hers actually. :)


message 49: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne Earley (srearley) | 4 comments I just finished Fierce Fairytales by Nikita Gill. I enjoyed it!


message 50: by Kasi (new)

Kasi (kasireadsjunkandstuff) | 23 comments For this challenge, I chose Spell by Ann Lauterbach, which I enjoyed. I definitely liked some pieces more than others. At times, I found the prose pieces to throw off the flow of reading, but several of them were very good, so I'll forgive that.


« previous 1
back to top