Book Riot's Read Harder Challenge discussion

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2019 Read Harder Challenge > Task #15: A book of mythology or folklore

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message 1: by Book Riot (new)

Book Riot Community (book_riot) | 430 comments Mod
Use this space to discuss books you're reading or that might fit the 15th Read Harder task.


message 2: by Laura (new)

Laura (affiknitty) | 9 comments I cannot recommend the audiobook of Norse Mythology, read by Neil Gaiman, highly enough!


message 3: by Kelsey (new)

Kelsey (xtoloveistolivex) | 7 comments I might go with one of the Lore books: The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures, The World of Lore: Wicked Mortals, or The World of Lore: Dreadful Places. I've been meaning to read these for quite awhile!


message 4: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 3 comments Laura wrote: "I cannot recommend the audiobook of Norse Mythology, read by Neil Gaiman, highly enough!"

I second this!


message 5: by Kimberley (new)

Kimberley (kimirons) | 30 comments I was planning to read American Gods... that works right?


message 7: by Variablestar (last edited Dec 17, 2018 03:46PM) (new)

Variablestar | 11 comments Circe by Madeline Miller? I already read Norse Mythology by Neil Gaimen- I also loved it.


message 8: by Megan (new)

Megan | 131 comments Laura wrote: "I cannot recommend the audiobook of Norse Mythology, read by Neil Gaiman, highly enough!"

That’s what I’m reading.


message 9: by Chrissy (new)

Chrissy | 89 comments I’m going to read A Thousand Beginnings and Endings, a collection of stories based in Asian folklore and mythology.


message 10: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (apsalar) | 15 comments Laura wrote: "I cannot recommend the audiobook of Norse Mythology, read by Neil Gaiman, highly enough!"

This will be my choice as well!


message 11: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 129 comments I started The Kalevala in 2017 before a trip to Finland. I was really enjoying it but put it down & then life happened & I never finished it. What a perfect reason to make another attempt!


message 12: by Teresa (new)

Teresa | 357 comments Kimberly, mythology and folklore are one of my favorite subjects and in my opinion, American Gods definitely counts.


message 13: by Kimberley (new)

Kimberley (kimirons) | 30 comments Teresa: Good thanks! I borrowed it from my friend about a year ago I think it’s about time I read it and gave it back!


message 14: by Mercedes (last edited Dec 18, 2018 03:59AM) (new)

Mercedes (villadinorah) The King Must Die by Mary Renault, is on the Feminista List. She wrote a number of books based on Greek mythology.


message 15: by Yvan (new)

Yvan Ngo (she-reads-again) | 1 comments I wonder if The Lightning Thief will work for this?


message 16: by Kate (last edited Dec 18, 2018 07:21AM) (new)

Kate | 116 comments Yvan wrote: "I wonder if The Lightning Thief will work for this?"

I definitely think it fits, and since the protagonist has ADHD and dyslexia, it would also work for a book about a person who identifies as neurodiverse. (Rick Riordan's son also has ADHD and dyslexia, and I've heard from many professionals that the portrayal is done well.)

I would like to go outside of the Greek/Roman, Egyptian, and Norse traditions for this and have been meaning to read Akata Witch, which I think fits.


message 17: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tracyisreading) Im thinking Daughter of the Forest but its long. If I can't pull it off Ill double dip with Circe or The Lightning Thief. I think I have a few books picked out for mythology for other challenges.


message 18: by Beth (new)

Beth | 44 comments I'm either listening to the audio book by Norse Mythology by Gaiman or reading The Song of Achilles.


message 19: by Brittany (new)

Brittany Morrison | 64 comments Season of Mists fits here and it will give me a good excuse to continue on with the Sandman series.


message 20: by Virginia (new)

Virginia (vlgrantham) | 7 comments My pick will probably be The Silence of the Girls. I picked it up earlier this year, but I probably wouldn't read it so soon otherwise.


message 21: by Teresa (new)

Teresa | 357 comments Book Of A Thousand Days by Shannon Hale is an excellent retelling of a Grimm tale.


message 22: by Susanne (last edited Dec 22, 2018 05:43AM) (new)

Susanne | 49 comments Since I want to read a book by an Ethiopian author for another challenge, I will probably choose The God Who Begat a Jackal: A Novel by Nega Mezlekia, which seems to be based on Ethiopian mythology.

It is also set in the 17th century and is about a love story (so it could fit into task #16 with a little stretch) and has only 9 reviews on goodreads.


message 23: by Tabitha (new)

Tabitha D (windmillstilt) | 49 comments Does anyone have any suggestions for mythology or folklore like Lore? Basically where you learn about them instead of just stories inspired by them? Might go with Lore, but not sure yet.


message 24: by Stina (new)

Stina (stinalyn) | 179 comments I still haven't started my copy of Gaiman's Norse Mythology, so this is an easy pick!


message 25: by Brandyn (new)

Brandyn (brandy_k) | 59 comments Does it have to be folklore of our world or can it be fictional folklore like The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic?


message 26: by Hope (new)

Hope I'll probably go with Bullfinch's Mythology.


message 27: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca_splain) | 31 comments Would Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch work for this category? I've never read it and really want to read it before the Amazon series comes out.


message 29: by Lindsey (new)

Lindsey (lindseyclare) | 34 comments I think I might try The Blue Salt Road by Joanne M. Harris - if for no other reason than the pretty cover!


message 30: by Kira (new)

Kira | 4 comments I've had a copy of The Myth of the Birth of the Hero on my desk for almost a year. I'm going with that one!


message 31: by Leanna (new)

Leanna Keist | 0 comments Would retellings work? I've had "Vassa in the Night" by Sarah Porter on my list forever- it's based on the Russian folktale "Vasilisa the Beautiful"


message 32: by Kdmorton (new)

Kdmorton | 10 comments I think The City of Brass counts, and I cannot recommend it enough. Heavily inspired by Islamic mythology.


message 33: by TT (new)

TT | 5 comments I would definitely recommend The Golem and the Jinni, a tale of two mythological creatures living the immigrant experience in late 19th century New York.

The Autobiography of Red is loose retelling of the myth of Geryon and Heracles written in beautiful verse. It’s short and lovely.


message 34: by rae (last edited Dec 28, 2018 07:12PM) (new)

rae (inkwashesout) | 40 comments Would The Seas count? Or Freshwater?


message 35: by Daleen (new)

Daleen | 2 comments I think I’ll go with The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. Read Circe a few months back and loved it.


message 36: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra (xandraj09) | 8 comments Brandyn wrote: "Does it have to be folklore of our world or can it be fictional folklore like The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic?"

I'd be inclined to count it since the stories are also pretty close to a lot of our "real" folklore (one of them is essentially the little mermaid)


message 37: by Yuna (new)

Yuna | 4 comments Chrissy wrote: "I’m going to read A Thousand Beginnings and Endings, a collection of stories based in Asian folklore and mythology."

Me too! Also meshes with a personal goal to read more anthos/collections because I've accumulated so many of them.


message 38: by Katrina (new)

Katrina (katastrophe) | 1 comments I believe Weight by Jeanette Winterson would work, it’s one of my all-time faves.


message 39: by Mandie (new)

Mandie (mystickah) | 146 comments Would Circe work for this?


message 40: by Bonnie G. (new)

Bonnie G. (narshkite) | 1369 comments Mandie wrote: "Would Circe work for this?"
Yes, certainly. It is a perfect fit!


message 41: by Lucia (new)

Lucia Kelly | 45 comments Rebecca wrote: "Would Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch work for this category? I've never read it and really want to read it before the Amazon series comes out."

Since the book deals primarily with organised religion rather than mythology/folklore I don't think so. Though I would recommend reading it anyway - maybe use it for the humour book category?


message 42: by Lucia (new)

Lucia Kelly | 45 comments Hi there! I compiling lists of everyone's suggestions for the challenges in case that's easier for people (I know it is for me!) c:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...


message 43: by Caitlyn (new)

Caitlyn (caitlynmckinney) | 10 comments Kdmorton wrote: "I think The City of Brass counts, and I cannot recommend it enough. Heavily inspired by Islamic mythology."

And the sequel, The Kingdom of Copper, comes out this month!


message 44: by Amber (new)

Amber | 5 comments Virginia wrote: "My pick will probably be The Silence of the Girls. I picked it up earlier this year, but I probably wouldn't read it so soon otherwise."

Me too... I had it for several months and just started it, and didn't have high expectations but I'm really enjoying it thus far!


message 45: by Cody (new)


message 46: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (dawnb3) | 11 comments Tracy wrote: "Im thinking Daughter of the Forest but its long. If I can't pull it off Ill double dip with Circe or The Lightning Thief. I think I have a few books picked..."

In what other category will Circe count? It's at the top of by TBR pile and double dipping is a plus!


message 47: by Hillary (new)

Hillary | 2 comments Hi All-

Would you say that Jules Verne- 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea would count for this? I've never read the original text, so I figured now would be a good chance! Thanks!


message 48: by Bonnie G. (new)

Bonnie G. (narshkite) | 1369 comments Dawn, Circe won the Goodreads readers choice for fantasy this year, so it counts for that.


message 49: by Kelly (last edited Jan 03, 2019 08:06AM) (new)

Kelly | 30 comments There's several feminist retellings of Greek myths that I'm interested in, such as:

Lavinia, Ursula K. LeGuin
Galatea, Madeline Miller
xo Orpheus, Kate Bernheimer, ed.
The Penelopeiad, Margaret Atwood
Alcestis, Katharine Beautner

But I'm also thinking I might lean into the "folklore" part of this and read Naomi Novik's Spinning Silver, which I wanted to read last year but didn't get to.

The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter would be a cool choice for feminist re-tellings of fairy tales.

Daniel Ortberg's The Merry Spinster: Tales of Everyday Horror (pubbed as Mallory Ortberg prior to the author's transition), would also appear to fit this challenge as well as the humor challenge.

If you are looking for a romance read that might meet this category, there's a LOT. There are countless romances that are re-tellings of fairy tales, classic folklore, and mythology. It's almost a whole genre unto itself.

If you are looking for folklore that feels kind of like old school fantasy, look at Robin McKinley's many fairy tale re-tellings.


message 50: by Lorna (new)

Lorna (rogue_librarian) Laura wrote: "I cannot recommend the audiobook of Norse Mythology, read by Neil Gaiman, highly enough!"

I'll second that!


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