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Footnotes 2017-2018 > Privileged opinion of libraries by Forbes

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message 1: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7710 comments Well, this guy is a privileged a$$hat.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmou...


message 2: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1545 comments Yes he is. I suspect this article is a pretty much just a way for them to get clicks/discussion


message 3: by Hebah (new)

Hebah (quietdissident) | 675 comments Judging by the rapid flurry of (rightful) condemnation I've seen on this, it was absolutely effective clickbait.


message 4: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8128 comments I can't even get to it. It takes me to an ad with an option to "click to site" at which point it gives me an error.


message 5: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte | 1493 comments I wonder if it got taken down. The article is no longer on the Forbes site. All that you can find is this article from the LA Times that talks about the backlash received and even the link in the LA Times article gives you an error.


message 6: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8128 comments Charlotte wrote: "I wonder if it got taken down. The article is no longer on the Forbes site. All that you can find is this article from the LA Times that talks about the backlash received and even the link in the L..."

Oh, that's interesting! I tried again from a friend's link on facebook, hoping I could get to it from there, but I got the same thing.


message 7: by Meli (new)

Meli (melihooker) | 3151 comments OK, I thought it was just me.

This topic came up in my book club Sunday though... strange, strange times.


message 9: by annapi (new)

annapi | 4914 comments I was able to read the article a few days ago, before Nicole posted this. It was a load of bovine excrement, sounded like a rich privileged brat yapping about stuff they were totally ignorant of. I did wonder if it was deliberately done to ruffle feathers and see what response it would get, it seemed to me to be intentionally provocative.


message 10: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2063 comments I wonder if he has ever spent a day, just one full day in a library.


message 11: by KateNZ (new)

KateNZ | 2214 comments The original article read like attention-seeking Twitter-infused polemic (from someone long on opinion and short on evidence) rather than an informed but controversial comment. The comment on the takedown (Linda’s link) was interesting


message 12: by Karin (new)

Karin | 6926 comments I am much relieved to see that it was taken down. Amazon could never, ever replace the library. My kids loved the library when they were growing up; they still like it. Storytime needs to be LIVE. Books need to be free for the taking with a card. Libraries do a lot to help authors survive. I can't tell you how many times I've bought books as gifts after reading them from the library.

But there is so much more. I'll stop before I go on a long rant because obviously I'm preaching to the choir here.


message 13: by Karin (last edited Jul 25, 2018 03:44PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments annapi wrote: " bovine excrement..."

I like this. I'm not sure if I've ever used this exact combination of words or not, but am always happy to find ways of using this expression that avoid using a 4 letter word.


message 14: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2063 comments Here is a question for conversation.

Libraries all over are having trouble finding funding. Every city I've lived in but is always cutting hours, staff, programs, and new purchases. So, is there any innovation that could take place with libraries. I think e-libraries have helped but in my area many are not even aware this exists.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

This is the first place I've lived where the libraries are not only thriving but it's impossible to find parking. I usually just walk the mile to get there. But you are right Jason, in so many places libraries are having trouble finding funding. What is e-library?


message 16: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2063 comments Where you library uses overdrive or some other program to lend books, audio books, and magazines straight to your device.


message 17: by Karin (last edited Jul 25, 2018 03:57PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Jason wrote: "Here is a question for conversation.

Libraries all over are having trouble finding funding. Every city I've lived in but is always cutting hours, staff, programs, and new purchases. So, is there ..."


But not all libraries are suffering. The Boston Public Library has recently finished a large renovation; I saw it when I visited Boston in June. They also have a cafe and it is a spot for some TV or radio talk show (I don't remember which) on public TV/radio.

Our local library has not cut any programs or hours and hasn't for years, and we are not in a large city. But some smaller areas have failed because the state government won't give funds if the city or town government doesn't give enough money. One of our neighbouring towns has increased their hours over the past 20+ years we have lived in this area.

BUT there are important things that they have done that I think need to be done.

1. Both of them have computers for patron use.
2. Both of them lend out ebooks, audiobooks and more.
3. Ours had a Friends of the Library that raises money for passes that offer discounts to a number of museums, zoos and other places, including all the way in Boston, Plymouth and Rhode Island (the zoo in RI for one).
4. Lots of programs for kids, including summer reading programs.
5. Paying attention to teens. The Boston Public Library, which is large, has a special room just for teens. Our local one is finally setting up a dedicated section for y/a instead of mixing it up. Also, they have a large manga section.
6. DVD movies to borrow.
7. Live events.

Now, while I've listed things above, here is an article I found for unconventional ways to raise money for libraries:
http://librarystrategiesconsulting.or...

Here are a few other interesting links:
https://www.pinterest.com/sheehanj/li...


message 18: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2063 comments Thanks for that info. Glad to hear all libraries are not suffering.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Jason wrote: "Where you library uses overdrive or some other program to lend books, audio books, and magazines straight to your device."

I have not heard of that. It's nice that some have implemented that.


message 20: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2063 comments Rachel, ask your library of it uses overdrive or a like service.


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Jason wrote: "Thanks for that info. Glad to hear all libraries are not suffering."

I live in Flagstaff, which is a university town so I'm sure this also helps as far as funding goes. Its a town of 60,000 and the university is the largest employer here. There is a community college here as well. This library holds so many unique events. For the summer its breweries and books since there are so many small breweries here. So folks meet at the breweries once a week, talk about books and it also helps the local businesses. Tourism from the valley also brings in the money here so local business is a big deal I'm sure this also makes the difference. The fact that the library has programs that also supports local business is a big deal here. I've never lived in a place where they have done this but I really like it and it seems to thrive.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Jason wrote: "Rachel, ask your library of it uses overdrive or a like service."

I will Jason. I have to go there tomorrow to pick up a book I have on hold so I'll check it out.


message 23: by Amy (new)

Amy | 8290 comments Our library is doing fabulously! It has a lot of supporters, and a number of floors of different kinds of resources. It has programs all over the place. And now it will have my extra $15 for the water damaged book. As I said, I love some of the extra touches like the community puzzles that they have now. You can even check out puzzles. You can check out games.


message 24: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 5641 comments Karin wrote: "annapi wrote: " bovine excrement..."

I like this. I'm not sure if I've ever used this exact combination of words or not, but am always happy to find ways of using this expression that avoid using ..."


One thing I love about the old M*A*S*H TV series was the colorful expressions Col Potter used for "bovine excrement" - Horse hockey!


message 25: by annapi (last edited Jul 25, 2018 04:56PM) (new)

annapi | 4914 comments Speaking of librarians.... I can't remember if I found this here on PBT or somewhere else, but in case you all missed it, here's a library that seems to be doing ok: https://www.boredpanda.com/library-so...

And this article contains a librarian "mean tweets" video: https://mashable.com/2017/10/15/karda...


message 26: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 1182 comments My small local library is doing pretty well. I live in a town with a liberal arts college, so the town and gown provides a pretty diverse reading selection! It’s always busy there- parking is premium. Especially on senior education program days.


message 27: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2063 comments Maybe I am the bad luck to libraries. Haha. Or it's just Georgia.


message 28: by Karin (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Book Concierge wrote: "One thing I love about the old M*A*S*H TV series was the colorful expressions Col Potter used for "bovine excrement" - Horse hockey!."

I wonder if I ever saw that episode and then forgot it.


message 29: by Karin (last edited Jul 25, 2018 06:37PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Rachel wrote: "I live in Flagstaff, which is a university town so I'm sure this also helps as far as funding goes. ."

Boston is a college town--not kidding--it has the country's, and perhaps the world's--most number of universities & colleges in a square mile, too. The population during the school year is about 1/3 college/university students.

But I don't think that's the only reason their library is doing well. I think that the older part of the building is a historic landmark, what with all of the murals on the walls and the architecture--I would guess it was very expensive to build.


message 30: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 1182 comments Karin wrote: "Rachel wrote: "I live in Flagstaff, which is a university town so I'm sure this also helps as far as funding goes. ."

Boston is a college town--not kidding--it has the country's, and perhaps the w..."


The Boston Public Library is stunning! We visited a few years ago.


message 31: by LibraryCin (last edited Jul 25, 2018 08:21PM) (new)

LibraryCin | 8128 comments Jason wrote: "Here is a question for conversation.

Libraries all over are having trouble finding funding. Every city I've lived in but is always cutting hours, staff, programs, and new purchases. So, is there ..."


E-books still cost. The library still needs to pay for the ebooks. Often, there is a limited number of uses (to mimic a physical book that would eventually be so worn, as to be no longer useful). In fact, I think a physical book can often be used more than the number of times some publishers allow an ebook to be used. Physical book can be repaired, etc.

Also, a library has to pay for however many licenses to lend out multiple copies at the same time. It's why you still sometimes see only one "copy" of an ebook and have to put it on hold.

You may not need space for e-books, but you still need staff to negotiate the licenses for the ebooks, and IT staff, as well, to make sure it's all running smoothly.


message 32: by Ladyslott (new)

Ladyslott | 1880 comments Karin wrote: "Jason wrote: "Here is a question for conversation.

Libraries all over are having trouble finding funding. Every city I've lived in but is always cutting hours, staff, programs, and new purchases...."


Karin- Our library also has all the things you listed. They also have SAT study groups/rooms for those prepping to get into college. It's always busy and they are always trying to stay relevant.


message 33: by JoLene (new)

JoLene (trvl2mtns) | 1532 comments Our county libraries are doing well —- some libraries do author events, some have several book clubs, specific skill development. However, the one thing that I’ve noticed at my particular branch is they seem to have less physical books on hand. However, I do know they made investments in the digital services.

I believe that libraries are an important part of the community. I think a lot of the funding comes from property taxes.


message 34: by Idit (new)

Idit | 1028 comments We love our local inner Sydney library.
I think City of Sydney needs to put some more money into their audiobook collection, (and choose better!%^#)... but other than that - they are brilliant.

Our neighborhood branch is our go-to location for any rainy day.
It's a beautiful building, it has a community centre above it - which has craft clubs, any support group that someone can think of making (AA, IT skills for pensioners, whatever)
The library itself has craft and book reading for kids every week, page colouring always on the ready, friendly staff, computers, newspapers, magazines, wifi, etc

a year ago they had an amnesty in which they erased all past debts and stopped giving fines for late returns - so we love them even more.

They are building a posh new library in a new up & coming suburb, and few weeks ago they were going to close down a smaller branch near by, but parents from our schools started a petition, and the community managed to stop that library closure.


message 35: by Amy N. (new)

Amy N. | 256 comments I love hearing about everyone's libraries! Each library is unique to serve its unique community, and I love it. Ours has a huge emphasis on programs (we're kind of the only free thing parents can take their kids to in the summer). Recently we had a Harry Potter night where we turned the library into Hogwarts and the kids came dressed up in their robes, made wands, got to meet Dumbledore and McGonagall, got sorted into houses (I'm Hufflepuff). It was a huge hit.

I will second everything LibraryCin said about e-books-- I had no idea they were so expensive until my director started having me deal with them. You can easily drop $100 on a single title, and that number only goes up the more 'features' you get, like being able to let more than one person read it at a time. I'm reasonably certain it's possible for a large library to spend over $1,000 on a single title, all because of those pesky licenses, collectively known as Digital Rights Management (the thing that makes it so you can't rip a DVD to your computer, for example).

I wrote my college thesis on the impact of e-books on libraries, so the subject is one I'm interested in, though my info is almost ten years out of date -_-; Whenever someone comes into the library and asks how long until we're replaced by computers I have to laugh. Until Digital Rights Management gets under control print books will still have plenty of advantages over e-books, and one of those advantages is often overlooked: getting young children to read. The nostalgia factor for print books that people assume will dissipate over time is not going to go away until there is some digital equivalent to handing a toddler a book and getting that tactile engagement children respond so well to. Board books, for instance, will never have e-book equivalents because half the point of those is to be able to give them to a baby and let them chew on them haha.

In a tinfoil hat aside, in my opinion DRM won't get under control until copyright laws in general stop having such a stranglehold on creative works: because of the expert lawyers of the Disney company, copyrights now last for the life of the author plus 70 years, which is a little longer than ol' Walt has been dead. When we start coming up on 70 years since his passing, expect the Mouse to start trying for life plus 120. (/tin foil hat off)

In the interest of not sounding like a total Luddite, I do like e-books-- in concept, anyway. I don't personally read them much myself, so maybe I am a little of a Luddite.


message 36: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) I knew e-books weren't a cheaper alternative to hardcovers, but I had no idea that they were that much more expensive. I find it surprising, then, that I see so many (relative to my expectations!) in the libraries I patronize.

Libraries are paper books, digital books, programs, air-conditioned refuges with clean bathrooms, wi-fi hotspots, public computers, and *so* much more. I have no idea what the Forbes article said, but if it was some sort of claim that they were not needed and a waste of taxes, the author is def. an idjit or a troll.


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