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Marketing Tactics > What's your biggest issue when choosing which genre to write in?

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message 1: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments As I begin to write my debut novel, I struggle with the constraints of genres. My writing is literary fiction. But I wish I could sell to the much larger mass market.

Any thoughts on genre / category busting, while also meeting the needs (and expectations) of your key readers?

Thanks!


message 2: by Tomas, Wandering dreamer (new)

Tomas Grizzly | 731 comments Mod
I admit I always thought writers wrote in genres they like to read and thus know.
And it works for me. I prefer reading fantasy and what I am working on is fantasy as well. And by writing in the genre I like to read, I have some idea of what people might want to see there.


message 3: by Lori-Ann (new)

Lori-Ann Claude | 76 comments Adding to what Tomas is saying, the added advantage of writing in a genre you like to read is you'll be more passionate about it.

If that's not the issue (being passionate about what you're writing), then it comes down to market. To get into the mass market, most of the time, authors go through big publishers and are often known (or the publisher is taking a gamble). Mass market means making a profit through volume. Literary fiction rarely applies to that kind of mass market. But keep in mind, mass market, the author doesn't earn much per book.

Some sites like Kindlepreneur recommend looking for categories with few competitors to get a good sale ranking and thus sell more per day. Kindlepreneur will explain how to find those categories.

If you're curious about market share analysis, I suggest looking at the reports in the Authorearnings web site.


message 4: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 1126 comments Without knowing the book's content and subject, it's hard to say which genres and how to classify. But literary fiction is a broad category. There is a lot over of overlap. Your cover should give an indication to encourage/discourage certain readers. Unless the content is on the extreme end of genres, the sub-categories and key words available allow for interpretation.


message 5: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments My suggestions are...

Write what you want to write without regard to genre. To thine own self be true, and all that. Forget about writing for some specific demographic and concentrate on your own voice.

To me it seems that trying to tailor your work to a particular set of readers is putting the cart before the horse. Write passionately from your own desires, toward your own statement/message and then find readers for that, rather than the other way around.


message 6: by Wanjiru (new)

Wanjiru Warama (wanjiruwarama) | 204 comments I write what comes to mind and what triggers my interest.


message 7: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4358 comments Mod
Mark wrote: "As I begin to write my debut novel, I struggle with the constraints of genres. My writing is literary fiction."

This's largely why I do literary fiction, too. Writing in genres feels too confining to me.

The upside of writing literary fiction is I believe my work is leaps and bounds better than it would be if I tried to force myself to write a more popular genre. The downside is, books like this are really hard to market. My first novel (and my second, actually) have some strong elements of romance in them, but would hardly pass in the Romance genre. I have tried to market the first thus - getting tons of clicks on the book, but very few sales.

I've taken some time off from marketing, but will be hitting it hard in a few weeks when the next novel is out. I have no idea how I will try to present it to get the attention of the masses when it will likely only appeal to a small portion of the populace.


message 8: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4358 comments Mod
No links, please.


message 9: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments That's how I'd like to approach it too, Tomas.


message 10: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Thanks Lori-Ann for you comment and mentions of AuthorsEarnings website. It shows the leading categories/genres in terms of sales as: Literature and Fiction (a catch-all); Mystery, Suspense, Thriller; and Romance.

Just wishing I could appeal to all three without diluting my literary writing. :-)


message 11: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Micah wrote: "My suggestions are...

Write what you want to write without regard to genre. To thine own self be true, and all that. Forget about writing for some specific demographic and concentrate on your own ..."


Sage advice, Micah.

I was just wondering how to reach a broader audience while satisfying the one that I'm true to. Every author's pipe dream, yes?


message 12: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Alex wrote: "My stories dictate the genre I write in..."

Interesting approach, Alex.


message 13: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Dwayne wrote: "This's largely why I do literary fiction, too. Writing in genres feels too confining to me.

The upside of writing literary fiction is I believe my work is leaps and bounds better than it would be if I tried to force myself to write a more popular genre. The downside is, books like this are really hard to market. ..."


My point exactly, Alex. Seems the problem with writing what you love, for the kinds of readers who are simpatico with you, places firm limits on the potential reach of your (slaved over) work.

Doesn't seem quite fair.


message 14: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 1126 comments If you haven't set up an Author page in Amazon, it's a good idea to set one up, set up a book title and start looking at categories and key words. It's amazing how specific can get. Have to do it anyway! :) Being somewhat familiar with it now will save your eyeballs later. They do change too.


message 15: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments I was just wondering how to reach a broader audience while satisfying the one that I'm true to..."

I'll worry about that once I actually have any audience!


message 16: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Mark wrote: "Any thoughts on genre / category busting, while also meeting the needs (and expectations) of your key readers?..."

Hi Mark, you will need to meet the 'conventions,' of whatever genre you will be writing in, the important thing is to manage to insert a 'fresh take,' on those conventions.


message 17: by P.D. (new)

P.D. Workman (pdworkman) Lit fic doesn't generally sell well. If you are looking to make a higher number of sales, you need to write in a hot-selling genre. Romance, erotica, cozy mystery, space opera, YA fantasy, etc.

Yes, you'll be expected to meet the conventions, tropes, and constraints of those genres. Covers, titles, plots, beats, twists, endings, etc. Sometimes that is challenging, sometimes it is freeing. Constraints can result in a well-structured, better story.

Writing to market doesn't mean selling out. It means finding the niche that you can enjoy writing in and tell the stories you want to tell in and reach a particular audience of readers. If you write to bigger, hungrier, well-established audiences, you will sell more books with less effort.


message 18: by Mark (last edited Jul 03, 2018 04:26PM) (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments P.D. Workman (Pamela) wrote: "Lit fic doesn't generally sell well. If you are looking to make a higher number of sales, you need to write in a hot-selling genre. Romance, erotica, cozy mystery, space opera, YA fantasy, etc. ..."

Hi P.D., your advice makes infinite pragmatic sense. Writing in a genre that sells oodles more readily is an obvious solution.

But what happens if your lifelong reading experience, and writing sensibilities, are in the literary realm? Would it not be inauthentic, and a form of pandering, to write instead for a mass market expressly to increase sales?

p.s. Any relation to Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse? :-)


message 19: by Robert (new)

Robert Edward | 42 comments Micah wrote: "Write what you want to write without regard to genre. To thine own self be true, and all that. Forget about writing for some specific demographic and concentrate on your own ..."

What he said. If what you're writing is good, there's an audience out there somewhere. You may just have to look harder to find it. So either write something about which you're not very passionate and jump into the glut of other authors doing the same thing, or do something fewer people are doing but in greater obscurity. Either way, the first step is to write something good, and you're far more likely to do that if you write what you want.


message 20: by Haru (new)

Haru Ichiban | 255 comments As an independent author who doesn't have large bucks to spend on publicity, you're going to have a hard time selling at first no matter the genre (trust me, romance and erotica don't mean huge insta-selling). If on top of that you write something that you don't like, you will hate your life. You'll never write with passion and never do your best.
Advice from someone who worked for eleven years in a career she never liked. Don't be like me.


message 21: by Leah (new)

Leah Reise | 356 comments I hope I don’t offend anyone, but I don’t think a writer “chooses” which genre to write. I think the genre chooses the writer. Your story is something that comes from inside you. I don’t think you choose what it will be. I think the story comes to you, influenced by your experiences and personality and maybe some other things lol.


message 22: by P.D. (new)

P.D. Workman (pdworkman) Mark wrote: But what happens if your lifelong reading experience, and writing sensibilities, are in the literary realm? Would it not be inauthentic, and a form of pandering, to write instead for a mass market expressly to increase sales?

It takes time and effort to find a genre that is selling well that will work for your stories and allow you to write authentically in a space that will be more profitable. You need to really put some research into it. There's no silver bullet and what works for one writer won't work for another.

You can also split your efforts. While I write to market in a couple of genres, I still write passion projects in others. They earn me awards, but not a lot of sales. They are stories I need to tell.

The more I build my readership, the more people there will be who are willing to drift from one genre to another because they already know they like my writing, so I believe that good writing in popular genres will improve the readership and sales of my books in niche genres as well.


message 23: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 1126 comments Speaking about the title question: what is your biggest issue choosing a genre to write in? I don't have an issue, the stories are in the categories I read, crime, fantasy, SF, some literary, and children's lit. Just write.


message 24: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 552 comments Leah has a very good point. My stories 'came' to me, sort of plopping into my head! Yes, of course they were influenced by my own life experiences, preferences and so on, but the actual stories sort of wrote themselves propelled by the characters who'd developed, first in my head, then grown on the page.

I like writing like that. If I followed the loot, I'd have stuck to one genre like crime or romance. But I'd not enjoy writing them so much as I do now. My books are in different genres - even my trilogy morphs genres from book to book, gently but surely.

However, literary fiction, Mark, is what I also write in for some of my books but one can add other genres to it if writing for Amazon. When you upload your book, Mark, you'll be given a choice of two, with sub genres to choose from as well. Also, key words (up to 7) so you could have literary fiction as one of your main genres, then add, say, historical, then in the keywords you could put romance, mystery, crime and so on.

I would say don't force yourself into writing a particular top-selling genre if it's not for you.

If you're after the money (and most of us can understand that) then search the top 100 paid books on Amazon and see what the genres are. P.D. Workman's little list is useful too. As are her words about readers drifting from genre to genre if they like your style. There's good advice in this thread from others too.

Hope it goes well for you.


message 25: by Mark (last edited Jul 04, 2018 07:08AM) (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments P.D. Workman (Pamela) wrote: "You can also split your efforts. While I write to market in a couple of genres, I still write passion projects in others. They earn me awards, but not a lot of sales. They are stories I need to tell.

The more I build my readership, the more people there will be who are willing to drift from one genre to another because they already know they like my writing,..."


Great point, Pamela.

May I ask, though, if you use pen names for these niche genres you also write in? Because if so, how do readers know to follow you from one genre to another?

And if not (i.e. you use your same name on works for very distinct genres), does this cause confusion with your readers, and/or dilute your perceived expertise in any one genre?


message 26: by Tomas, Wandering dreamer (new)

Tomas Grizzly | 731 comments Mod
Maybe that's another thing to consider in such case: whether to write under one name and risk having split readership with little overlaps or to split the writer and have a specific audience for each.


message 27: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Micah wrote: "My suggestions are...

Write what you want to write without regard to genre. To thine own self be true, and all that. Forget about writing for some specific demographic and concentrate on your own ..."


Basically this. I don't confine myself to a single genre and write only what I would want to read. When it comes to categorizing my books later on, it's easy enough to use keywords to get my books into all appropriate genres. Deciding "I'm going to write a sci-fi" or "I'm going to write a romance" seems ill-fated at best.


message 28: by P.D. (new)

P.D. Workman (pdworkman) Mark wrote: "May I ask, though, if you use pen names for these niche genres you also write in? Because if so, how do readers know to follow you from one genre to another?

And if not (i.e. you use your same name on works for very distinct genres), does this cause confusion with your readers, and/or dilute your perceived expertise in any one genre?"


There are different approaches and different schools of thought, and it really depends on the genres. I could write a whole article on the subject. Authors like Joanna Penn may choose to use separate names for fiction vs. non-fiction writing. While she markets both on her website, they show up separately at stores, so her readers of thrillers see lots of thrillers rather than how-to-write books and vice versa. People who follow her know that she writes both, but reader recommendation algorithms are kept "clean" at the storefronts.

You want to meet reader expectations, so you don't want a reader to pick up an erotica book thinking it is a clean romance if you write in both genres. For something like that, you're probably going to want two different pen names, though some authors advertise the differences between the two with covers, keywords, advertising copy, separate series, etc.

If you do write under two separate pen names, you might keep readers informed of your other pen name, genres, and titles through your newsletter, back matter, author central, bios, website, social media, etc. "If you also like genre x, check out my books under the name..."


message 29: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (last edited Jul 05, 2018 08:40AM) (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4358 comments Mod
On the other side of the coin, some of my favorite authors wrote a myriad of different kinds of stories and books. They published them all under their real name or one pen name. I love them all the more for it. Everything I do could be called general fiction, but they're all different. Some are downright silly, some are somber. Some are dirty, some are clean(ish). They're all loosely connected, so I can't see writing under a lot of pseudonyms.


message 30: by R.S. (new)

R.S. Merritt | 17 comments Just write and hope your writing style is like enough by your readers that they'll bop around to different genres to see who you approached them. Commercially speaking you probably should stick to one base genre but to grow as a writer and to experience writing in different genres you obviously need to write what you're thinking of.


message 31: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4358 comments Mod
Comment deleted for linking.


message 32: by P.D. (new)

P.D. Workman (pdworkman) Sorry. It's right there in the Group Rules. No links. pdw needs to read...


message 33: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments I would like to thank you all for contributing your very helpful thoughts on this topic. Best of luck to each of you as you pursue your own writing!

MDS


message 34: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4358 comments Mod
Thank you, Mark.


message 35: by Tantra (new)

Tantra Bensko (tantrabensko) | 14 comments I used to write only Literary for much of my life. But I teach and edit all genres so I needed to know the exact rules for each one and also prove to students/clients that I could succeed in them, at least with published short stories. Those years of research and practice helped me to decide which genre to write when I wanted to have a chance of reaching a wider audience and getting a respectable number of reviews, to go beyond hobbyist and approach it as a business.

I studied the current market intensely and when it changed, I changed what I wrote. I wanted to do a series, so I shifted some manuscripts so they would all fit into one genre. I read and watched narratives in my chosen genre rather than watching the artistic avant-garde foreign films etc. I'd preferred, and it was amazing to see that I could willfully change my taste to become more attuned to genre (psychological suspense) than Literary. Turns out personality is very malleable.


message 36: by Mark (last edited Jul 07, 2018 11:23AM) (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Tantra wrote: "I used to write only Literary for much of my life... it was amazing to see that I could willfully change my taste to become more attuned to genre (psychological suspense) than Literary. Turns out personality is very malleable."

Tantra, you appear to be both a prolific and metamorphic author. From your Lucid Membranes to Remember to Recycle, so much output!

Regarding your chameleon-like capacity to write in varied genres, that must have taken a tremendous amount of work. Learning the respective tropes. Adjusting your tonality and lexical levels. I respect your efforts.

One comment, plus a question. Question first. As you switched categories, did you find yourself compromising at all re: abiding by the genre-du-jour's rules? I'd feel like Sybil in a blender after a while.

Now the comment. You said that "Turns out personality is very malleable." Might I qualify that by adding "to varying degrees"? I just can't see suddenly immersing myself in, say, sickly sweet romances (a genre foreign to me but which sells well), and willfully changing my taste away from LitFic.

Could it be that, unlike with your latest novel Glossolalia, I just haven't learned to speak in tongues yet? :-)


message 37: by Tantra (last edited Jul 07, 2018 11:32AM) (new)

Tantra Bensko (tantrabensko) | 14 comments Thank you, yes, prolific, and most of my Literary work is not on Amazon/Goodreads. I actually never felt like I was compromising, thank goodness. I think personality is malleable for some people more than others, too, though it was a big switch from experimental fiction to suspense, for me. But there are some genres that are already kind of a mix of lit and genre, like Gothic and Psychological Suspense.

But when you look at Gothic Romance on Amazon, which is a promising category for sales right now, it's not actually what it claims, but is mostly Paranormal Romance, something people love and I admire the authors, but it's fetishist and predictable, without the traditional meaningful and profound conventions of Gothic. To try to fit into the fetish world coming out of Lit would be pretty tough.


message 38: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Tantra wrote: "To try to fit into the fetish world coming out of Lit would be pretty tough."

Well, Tantra, at least we'd be able to be highly creative with our "safe words."

I agree with you about sticking close to the knitting. Wildly jumping from genre to genre, leaving not just your comfort zone but linguistic expertise and tastes far behind, is great for stretching one's abilities, however not so much for commercial success?


message 39: by Tantra (new)

Tantra Bensko (tantrabensko) | 14 comments For me, it's been sure better for success to change genres. The Literary books, like the hundreds of short stories I had in magazines, were never meant to sell, so the books have up to 5 reviews on Amazon. The psychological suspense books on the other hand have 80 and 50 reviews on Amazon.

However, when I had work published in all the commercial genres, that was short stories. I wouldn't do that with novels, but try to stick to one or two for a good while.


message 40: by L.K. (new)

L.K. Chapman | 150 comments Hi Mark,
When I was writing my debut novel I found myself struggling with the same sort of questions. I ended up writing something that doesn't fit neatly into any genres (it's a kind of sci-fi/ techno thriller/ family drama with elements of romance and also a lot of chapters about mental health!) The book was written in a "commercial" style; fast-paced with short-ish chapters, but it has always been a nightmare to market it. Occasionally it reaches people who like all the elements in the story and really enjoy it, but more often people like parts of it and not others, most commonly they like the main sci-fi plot and not the side stories, or occasionally it's the other way around.

I think I've written elsewhere in the group about how switching to writing in a popular genre and sticking more within its rules helped my writing career hugely. However I do feel that my debut novel was a case of me getting all the stuff out of my mind that was important to me at the time. It was about self-expression, and it needed to be that way for me to progress. Nowadays I actually find it freeing to stick more closely to the "rules" of my genre (psychological suspense/ psychological thrillers), and it still allows for enough creativity, while giving me more confidence that my books will probably sell once I have published them!

I admit I don't know much about literary fiction, but I would say that when I was writing my first book it was really more about just learning how to write a novel in an accessible, readable style, (even if the content ended up being a bit random!), and I then took what I learned forward into writing within my genre.

I'm not saying you should necessarily change your own style of writing, though. You might find as you write that your writing naturally evolves into what you really want it to be. I don't think you have to stop being true to yourself to make books more commercial, if that is something that is important to you (and I certainly don't think there is any shame in wanting to make money out of your writing!) As I said, I don't know much about literary fiction, but those are my observations from my own writing career - I hope some of it is helpful!


message 41: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments L.K. wrote: "Nowadays I actually find it freeing to stick more closely to the "rules" of my genre (psychological suspense/ psychological thrillers), and it still allows for enough creativity, while giving me more confidence that my books will probably sell once I have published them!"

Your reply is very thoughtful, L.K. It moved me to visit your website, and download a free copy of "Worth Pursuing." Will read later: the first few paragraphs look promising.

Given that you are a trained psychologist, it makes perfect sense that you have found satisfaction writing in your chosen genre. May I ask what you meant, though, by finding it "freeing" to stick more closely to the rules of your category?

I would have thought that your first novel, which you say didn't fit neatly into a single genre - yet captured what was important to you at that stage - would have been more liberating, if only by being less constraining.

So glad to hear that you are finding commercial success nowadays.


message 42: by L.K. (new)

L.K. Chapman | 150 comments Thank you Mark, and thanks for visiting my website :)

It's hard to explain exactly, but I think what I mean is that when I was in a situation where I wasn't trying to stick in a genre and I could write anything - that's actually a slightly scary proposition! I suppose it's a little bit like when people say they freeze when they're confronted with a blank page and need to start writing, because there can be something daunting about that.

If I start off by deciding I want to write a psychological thriller, I find that ideas come to mind more easily and I can start fleshing out a plot because I know what I'm trying to achieve (for example my books would tend have things like family secrets / emotional manipulation of one character by another character / frequent twists and turns in the plot / characters who aren't what they first seem/ a crime or mystery, but without covering police procedure and focusing on the relationships and emotional state of victim and perpetrator). Because I am keen to write my novels fairly quickly (it still takes me about 18 months, though!) having a starting point and a framework to follow helps my creative process. There's a lot of room within those themes to think of different plots- what is the family secret? Who is the person who seems nice but turns out to be nasty? What is the mystery/ crime that takes place? Why are people behaving the way that they do?

My stories still change and evolve a lot as they progress through drafts. They may end up being about something slightly different than when I start out, or maybe a character takes over and makes more of the story about them than I originally intended, but my genre can also guide my decision making when editing and developing the plot and characters. It doesn't have to be a completely rigid thing though, and I feel like I have my own style.


message 43: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 347 comments I am also one of those people who find what they write does not fit into any particular genre. A lot of what I have written is futuristic, so it becomes sort of scifi, but the messages I want to get through involve both economics and the need for logical thinking, while to make it attractive to read, it has a thriller component, and indeed that is the strongest. But to make the characters real, occasionally I even insert a small romance. Maybe that is why I am not a best seller, but that does not worry me. I feel that it is far better to write what you want to write, rather than confine yourself to some arbitrary set of rules that may not last anyway.


message 44: by Felix (new)

Felix Schrodinger | 138 comments I don't choose a genre - they choose me.


message 45: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 552 comments Well said, Ian.


message 46: by Haru (new)

Haru Ichiban | 255 comments I like that "Rules that may not last" part, Ian. Two of the genres I write in didn't exist a couple decades ago!

Remember the Smurfs, that have only one personality trait? It's as if writers (and artists) are forced to be Smurfs: Mystery Writer Smurf, Romance Writer Smurf, etc. We are human beings, not Smurfs. We are going to have bits of lots of things that interest us in our writing.

(However, strangely enough, I have met a lot of readers out there that ARE like Smurfs: OTP Reader Smurf, Clean Romance Reader Smurf. As a very eclectic reader myself, I never understood them.)


message 47: by Tomas, Wandering dreamer (new)

Tomas Grizzly | 731 comments Mod
Maybe some of them actually want to focus on one genre, because they feel they're strongest there. Or they have enough ideas in it to keep going.

What I am working on is fantasy and to exhaust all the ideas I have (should I write them all), I might need a decade at least. I'd like to give sci-fi a try but before I am done with this project, I probably won't even try to touch something for which I don't even have a developed idea (let alone concept for the storyline).


message 48: by Noor (new)

Noor Al-Shanti | 148 comments Personally, I scribble down ideas, sentences, descriptions, etc. as they come to me and then out of those scribbles eventually one story idea will feel developed enough to start seriously planning and writing and I'll write it. Sometimes it's sci fi, sometimes its fantasy, sometimes it's neither of my two favorite genres and it's something else completely. So like several others who have already commented, I don't "choose" the genre, each story develops in its own way and that's what dictates the genre it gets sorted into.

With that being said, because I've been developing my fantasy world for years now and I have different lands and maps and cultures and events I do find it easier to write in that world, because new ideas and stories can often fit in to it and fill in the spaces of that world. Perhaps this is why some authors like to stick to one genre... it becomes easier to work with what they've already built in that genre.

But personally, I could never stick to just one genre. Even if I wanted to, the stories won't let me.


message 49: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 787 comments Genres and categories are two different things IMO. You should write the genre your comfortable writing in and the issue tends to come after when your on Amazon and you find out that while they have your genre listed the sub categories are small or non-existent.

I mainly write horror and poetry but if I have an idea for another genre I still go ahead with it and try to sometimes appeal to the Amazon categories but only because I've done so much research that I know what's there and what isn't. What I don't know however is which of those genres sell the best which I suppose is an issue we all share.


message 50: by B.A. (new)

B.A. A. Mealer | 915 comments I'm one of those writers who write like they read. Different genres and categories. Each idea comes about from something that catches my interest. What they all have in common is the romance factor as it is part of life. When I get stuck on one book, I move to a different one. Currently, I'm editing a thriller and writing a contemporary romance, while doing the last little things on a Christian romance soon to be published. It's all about what you are comfortable with writing. For me, I have to keep the idea bunnies happy by pulling a few different ones out of the mix.


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