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Bulletin Board > What was your moment when you knew you knew you “made it” as an author?

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I was interviewed on Annette Drakes blog today about the moment I thought I had made it as an author and it's not about money. If it were about money I don't think I would ever "make it." How does your story relate to mine?

Here is the link: http://annettedrake.com/author-spotli...

Richard Brawer
wwww.silklegacy.com


message 2: by Author William (new)

Author William Fripp (william_fripp) | 20 comments When my work was picked up by a legitimate agent and sold to a publishing house...


message 3: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Clough (brendaclough) | 361 comments When Harlan Ellison phoned me. He had just read HOW LIKE A GOD, and he said to me (and I quote): "You write like an angel." Like an idiot I did not instantly snap back, "May I quote you on that on the back of every book I ever write from now until the end of time?"


message 4: by Geoff (new)

Geoff Woodland | 65 comments When a publisher asked me if they could publish my novel after reading the e-book version. Plus, of course, receiving the first cheque, however small :-o)


message 5: by Arabella (new)

Arabella Thorne (arabella_thornejunocom) | 354 comments When my bank account reflects enough earnings that I can quit my day job. Seriously.


message 6: by S. (new)

S. Aksah | 387 comments When my current single digit sales become four :)


Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell (neniacampbell) When I got interviewed by the Washington Post.

(Granted, that was more about my reviews than my books, but it still seemed to speak volumes about my visibility on this site so woo.)

I still wouldn't say I've made it, though. :o


message 8: by Renee E (new)

Renee E Brenda wrote: "When Harlan Ellison phoned me. He had just read HOW LIKE A GOD, and he said to me (and I quote): "You write like an angel." Like an idiot I did not instantly snap back, "May I quote you on that on ..."

That is STRONG!


message 9: by S. (new)

S. Aksah | 387 comments Or if you've got thrashed in a review. Thats a sign too.Havent got that yet.


message 10: by Linda (new)

Linda Jenkinson (linjen) | 27 comments Still to come! Watch this space.


message 11: by Geoff (new)

Geoff Woodland | 65 comments Even though the book has been commercially published and I've had some cash for my efforts, I don't really feel as though I've made it - perhaps after the next book or the one after that or. . . . .


message 12: by James (new)

James Corkill | 36 comments I don't write for the money, and I don't care about being famous. My first time feeling like I've made it as an author was when I received my first review and they actually enjoyed my story. I write because I get great satisfaction creating something from nothing.


message 13: by Author William (new)

Author William Fripp (william_fripp) | 20 comments I want fame and money


message 14: by James (new)

James Corkill | 36 comments Good for you, William. I hope you get it. Frankly, I couldn’t stand all the attention.
I guess that’s why I was a Federal Firefighter for thirty-two years. I like being the background hero, who nobody knows about.


message 15: by Jim (last edited Aug 06, 2014 07:39PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1047 comments I personally do not consider myself to be a successful author; however, because the publisher created and maintains a promotional website for my one and only novel, published Aug. 9, 2011 and it is still available via a number of commercial vendors in several formats, there are some readers, fans, and followers who seem to seem to think that I am.

The majority of sales favor the paperback format, followed by the e-Book, then audio book download, with the audio book on CD generating the least sales.

I still receive a quarterly sales report and royalty check from the publisher. Fortunately, I am not dependent upon that income. If I were, I would soon starve to death.


message 16: by Martyn (new)

Martyn Halm (amsterdamassassinseries) | 916 comments When I talked the acquiring editor of a Big 5 publishing house into reading my synopsis and sample and they send me a letter a month later requesting the full manuscript.

However, the contracts I was offered were less appealing, and after a few offers of meager advances and boilerplate contracts, I decided to self-publish.

Second time I felt I 'made it' is when I received fanmail from total strangers gushing how they enjoyed my books and asking when the next book was going to come out.


message 17: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) When my wife doesn't start to object when I tell her I have to pay for another book cover.

I'll up that standard when it actually happens.


message 18: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 2165 comments While I've sold copies of my books and done countless interviews I don't think I am anywhere close to saying I have made it as an author. I'm sure others feel this way too as it takes more then what i've mentioned to feel as though you've made it in this industry.


message 19: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments i dont feel like i've 'made it' yet. so i gotba few books pubblished. *shrug*. i hope to make enough to leave the hood. it would be nice. but dreams are nothing but...


message 20: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) When I held the first hard copy in my hands.


message 21: by Roland (new)

Roland Nuñez | 19 comments James wrote: "I don't write for the money, and I don't care about being famous. My first time feeling like I've made it as an author was when I received my first review and they actually enjoyed my story. I writ..."

I have to agree with this. I started writing because I had a story that I wanted to tell. For me, it was more about having people read it and enjoy it than it was about the money. I only sell the books and not give them away so as to no go bankrupt with my hobby, but my goal was never to become rich and famous from it.

With that said, I felt I made it as an author either when I got my first review of someone enjoying my work, or the time that a person I did not know previously recognized me as the author of one of my books (meaning that someone outside of my friends, family, and blog reviewers had read it).


message 22: by James (new)

James Corkill | 36 comments Roland wrote: "James wrote: "I don't write for the money, and I don't care about being famous. My first time feeling like I've made it as an author was when I received my first review and they actually enjoyed my..."

Hi, Roland. I know how you felt when recognized. The same thing happened to me at Walmart, and it was a great feeling.


message 23: by Roger (new)

Roger Cave | 70 comments James wrote: "I don't write for the money, and I don't care about being famous. My first time feeling like I've made it as an author was when I received my first review and they actually enjoyed my story. I writ..."

James, good for you. I thought I had made it in a small way when I was offered a contract for my books. Then the company was bought out and the contract put on hold!

So nearly there.

Nevertheless, every sale, and especially every review, make me smile. I may never `make it`but I love to write and tell a story. Just as long as someone else gets something from it, then I've achieved my goal.


message 24: by Khristina (new)

Khristina Chess (khristina_chess) I said that all I wanted was to have a stranger read my work and like it. When my first stranger posted a review (and sent me an e-mail to let me know how much she liked my book), I nearly hyperventilated. What a rush.

I know I'm not getting rich at this thing. But man, if I could keep getting shots of that, I'd be so happy!


message 25: by David (new)

David Staniforth (davidstaniforth) | 80 comments When sales started to come without having to promote so much.


message 26: by Nihar (new)

Nihar Suthar (niharsuthar) | 386 comments I write inspirational books, so I think my best moment as an author was hearing from readers how much my work helped improve their daily lives. It really motivates me to continue writing :)

-Nihar
www.niharsuthar.com


message 27: by Martyn (new)

Martyn Halm (amsterdamassassinseries) | 916 comments Roger wrote: "James, good for you. I thought I had made it in a small way when I was offered a contract for my books. Then the company was bought out and the contract put on hold!"

So, the contract fell through, but the validation stands. If a stranger wants to put up money to publish your work, then your work has attained the right standards.

I got that same validation, except I didn't like the standard boilerplate contracts, so I became a self-publishing author. Still, I had the validation that my work was 'trade-publishing worthy', so that's enough for me.


message 28: by Loretta (last edited Aug 07, 2014 04:17AM) (new)

Loretta (lorettalivingstone) | 134 comments I have to admit that I don't feel I have made it yet. But when a couple of well-established, traditionally published authors with big fan bases actually bought one of my books (without me even suggesting it to them) and reviewed in (one on my website, one on Amazon) it did give my self-esteem a huge boost.


message 29: by Anfenwick (new)

Anfenwick (anne-fenwick) | 10 comments That's really impressive everyone...
I'm going with: when the darn book is finished and I know it's good and I know there's a next one with the potential to be good too. Most of the rest is in the hands of other people.


message 30: by Renee E (last edited Aug 07, 2014 06:22AM) (new)

Renee E I'm with you on this, Anne.

Although an attagirl from someone of Harlan Ellison's stature would feel really good :D


message 31: by Lee (new)

Lee Cushing | 81 comments When you get regular royalties (even if it is only a couple of pounds a month)


message 32: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 08, 2014 12:34AM) (new)

One's personal perception of success as an author depends, I think, on the motivation for writing in the first place.

Some of us may be bursting with ideas we just want to broadcast (for more or less altruistic or self-centred reasons) and simply putting those ideas together (in a more or less professionally articulate and literate manner) and presenting them as a finished work, will signify having "made it" to that individual ... but not necessarily the rest of the world.

For others of us, the measure of success may be in peer and/or public acknowledgement of the quality and/or significance and importance of the work ... and not necessarily in volume of sales.

For others again, writing may be a personal artistic expression - abstract or surreal or whatever - an inner urge that is given release, and measures of success are largely unimportant: it's DOING it that is the reward in itself.

Lastly, and certainly not leastly, is the cash register.

However, for most of us, I suspect varying amounts of the ingredients of the above recipe go into baking our celebratory cake.

The really, really good thing about writing these days is the democratisation that has come with e-book self-publishing (bless you Smashwords, Amazon et. al.) where even someone like me who has rejection letters from all over the English-speaking world (not surprising when you see what - and maybe how - I write) can get someone to produce great-looking covers, put together a bouncy promo video on their home computer and promote themselves as an internationally celebrated author all over social media.

Twenty years ago I didn't have a hope of ever making it. Today we can all attain a measure of success in some form, and I think the literary world is better place for it.


message 33: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Blake | 73 comments I was elated when I sold my first short story. It was about my ancestors and I sold it to a magazine. I then wrote more short stories about my family/ancestors and sold them to various magazines. I'm now a self-published and publisher-published author of books.


message 34: by Linda (new)

Linda Jenkinson (linjen) | 27 comments Linda wrote: "Still to come! Watch this space."

I don't know if I have "made it" as an author, but I grew enormously today when my book The Heart Is a Pool: Poetry in the Shades of Love received a stunning review.

The review both humbled me and made me proud to be an author. If that's what "made it" is, then I guess I have. It wasn't just that the reviewer liked the content, but more that he recognized the work, planning, and creativity-- the craft --that went into writing it. I think that's the most we can ever expect from our readers.

The review is live at Amazon.com and here in the book review link.


message 35: by Tiger (new)

Tiger Gray (tiger_gray) | 5 comments I don't think I will feel I have made it until there's fanfiction of my work :)


message 36: by Jim (last edited Aug 18, 2014 01:47PM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1047 comments I don't think the word successful would be applicable; however, three experiences have made me feel worthy to claim the title of author.

When the first strangers started to contact me via the communication page of the website, created and maintained by the publisher's IT group to promote and support my novel.

When my two older grandsons informed me that they had proudly pointed out the paperback and audio book on CD formats of my novel to their teacher and classmates during a school-sponsored trip to the public library.

The quarterly sales report and royalty check, from the publisher, received in the mail every three months for the past three years, have been an ego booster as well.


message 37: by Jason (new)

Jason Crawford (jasonpatrickcrawford) | 62 comments When I got my first unsolicited fan feedback from someone I didn't know. That was what made me feel like I was really doing this author thing :)


message 38: by Rory (new)

Rory | 104 comments Jason wrote: "When I got my first unsolicited fan feedback from someone I didn't know. That was what made me feel like I was really doing this author thing :)"

Jason, I agree totally. I originally thought it would have been when I got my acceptance and contract from my publisher. But really the first time an unsolicited reader rated and made a positive comment on my book - that was when all the hard work seemed to finally pay off. Rory Church Home by Christmas


message 39: by Charles (new)

Charles Ameringer (cda1) | 85 comments I agree with most of the comments above. A postive rating or review on Goodreads from readers out there in cyberspace is a most gratifying experience. It gives you a glow inside and makes you feel you belong. The Old Spook by Charles Ameringer


message 40: by Michael (new)

Michael Coorlim (mcoorlim) | 22 comments When I started meeting people who had already read my books.


message 41: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 92 comments I will feel I have made it when someone finally introduces me as "Ms. Falconer, the author."


message 42: by Al (new)

Al Philipson (printersdevil) | 88 comments When FTL contacted me and asked to publish Children of Destruction.


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