Literary Fiction by People of Color discussion

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Buddy Reads > Buddy Read: No Ashes in the Fire

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message 1: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 2892 comments Mod
This thread is for the discussion of No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America by Darnell L. Moore.

The book discussion will begin on Wednesday, June 20th.


message 2: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Thanks, Beverly!

Wiki:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darne...

Unbound:
W/Brittney Cooper, Marc Lamont Hill and others...
https://youtu.be/UevEZle7rFk

NY Journal of Books review:
https://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book...


message 3: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Prologue June 20th

Passage June 22nd
Camden’s flames

Ripples June 24th
Boo Boo’s flames (of another sort)


message 4: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Has anyone else started No Ashes?

Here’s a bit from the author

https://youtu.be/-seRMp6obzY


message 5: by Gabriella (new)

Gabriella (quietbandit) | 13 comments Hi y'all!

Flipped back through to remember my reactions to the Prologue, and I think one thing that struck me was the great desire Moore has to share and uplift the people around him through his narrative—his family, his Camden community, disenfranchised QTPOC, etc. Moore is telling his specific story, but also recognizing that "this story is not new. And my story is not unique."

I've read a handful of memoirs this year, both by white and (Q)POC authors, and I think this desire to speak for more than yourself is very specific to the latter group. While reading When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, I noticed that Patrice Khan-Cullors, another author/activist, exhibited the same urge to share the life experiences more than just herself.

This was STRIKINGLY different than Ariel Levy's navel-gazing in The Rules Do Not Apply, or even Leslie Jamison's mostly failed attempts at universality in The Recovering: Intoxication and Its Aftermath.

Has anyone else found this phenomenon (memoirs from queer and/or POC folks seeming to put the whole team on their backs), or am I overreacting?


message 6: by Ify (new)

Ify (ifeyinwa) | 10 comments I'm picking this up from the library tomorrow, and plan to start reading it soon so I can participate in this conversation!


message 7: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Ifeyinwa wrote: "I'm picking this up from the library tomorrow, and plan to start reading it soon so I can participate in this conversation!"

Great! It’s very readable if you know what I mean, Ifeyinwa. You start reading and it just flows. Even though some of the material is difficult.


message 8: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Prologue:
“I knew writing an honest memoir would require me to tell the truth about my life, which has been full of hostility and splendor. Discovering the difference between what’s true and all the lies one comes to believe requires a direct confrontation with the past.”
I liked that statement a lot.

What I like about this book and is quite different from many memoirs I’ve read, is that he doesn’t use “imagined” dialogue in the scenes. Some authors will neglect to use a disclaimer that full scenes described in the book may not be as they really are. I think it’s why many people dislike reading memoirs. It just comes off inauthentic. The fact that you can recall a full five page conversation at the tender age of four. I might call it the James Frey effect.


message 9: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Gabriella wrote: "Hi y'all!

Flipped back through to remember my reactions to the Prologue, and I think one thing that struck me was the great desire Moore has to share and uplift the people around him through his ..."


I must read that Patrice Khan-Cullors book. I’ve heard some awesome things about it. I’ve also heard really good things about I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness. Particularly the first essay, White People Are Exhausting.

Oh, and wouldn’t you know, The TERRIBLE arrived in the mail yesterday.


message 10: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Passage

Mr. Moore introduces us to Camden, NJ and also his family in this chapter. Particularly, his maternal grandparents, Jean and George. Both the city and his family will play a vital role throughout this book. His grandfather most profoundly.


message 11: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Ripples

There’s a lot of abuse in this chapter. Darnell’s father nicknamed Boo Boo is very abusive to his mother. This is really difficult to read.


message 12: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 3892 comments Mod
Darnell L. Moore will appear on The Daily Show w/Trevor Noah this Thursday. And while I’m at it, Janet Mock will be on Wednesday.

Happy Pride!🏳️‍🌈


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