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Featured Series and Cozies > Rosie the Riveter (Don't Die Under the Apple Tree) - Amy P. Meade

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message 1: by jaxnsmom (new)

jaxnsmom | 2408 comments Mod
August

Don't Die Under the Apple Tree by Amy Patricia Meade Don't Die Under the Apple Tree

Here's where to discuss the book.

Straighten Up and Die Right


message 2: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 182 comments I love this title! Not sure I'll be able to get to this, but I'll put it on my list!


message 3: by Melodie (new)

Melodie (melodieco) | 653 comments I read this one when it came out a couple of years ago and liked it. There was supposed to be a second one last year, but it apparently was never published. If you like stories set in WWII America, this is pretty good.


message 4: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca | 107 comments I tend to struggle with cozies set in the past...but this one looks good!


❂ Murder by Death  (murderbydeath) I really liked this one as well and was really disappointed that there wasn't a second one.


message 6: by Randa (last edited Aug 04, 2014 03:20PM) (new)

Randa | 175 comments Boy I seem to have picked books with missing follwup or so called published books that just were't. While making my selection one of the criterria was there had to be at least a second book, I just never thought to make sure it actually existed. Live and learn.

I liked the book though and was looking forward to reading the second.


message 7: by jaxnsmom (last edited Aug 17, 2014 08:19AM) (new)

jaxnsmom | 2408 comments Mod
I'm about halfway through and liking the book more than I thought I would. WWII and the shipyard showing women's role is a unique setting and is interesting on it's own, but even more fascinating to me is the overall attitude of patriotism and willingness to do what's necessary. That's so in contrast to today's attitude in the US.

I think I'm most saddened by today's unwillingness to do something for the greater good instead of thinking only of one's self. There is such a sense of entitlement that only seems to get worse with each generation. If it weren't for all of the people who do make meaningful contributions, I think I'd lose hope about the future of our world. Do you think that with the more we have of luxury items that are considered necessities, the less we are willing to give up?


message 8: by Randa (new)

Randa | 175 comments jaxnsmom wrote: "I'm about halfway through and liking the book more than I thought I would. WWII and the shipyard showing women's role is a unique setting and is interesting on it's own, but even more fascinating ..."

I'm not sure that people aren't willing to give things up, but I do believe people give differently now. I know a lot of people who give of their time because they can't afford to give money. Others who support food pantries by donating a small bag of groceries or even one lone item. We are constantly bombarded with requests for money; on any given day I throw out one or two charities requesting money through the mail. We can only give so much and still pay for our kids' colleges, put money aside for retirement and yes enjoy the luxuries we work so hard for. I think we still are a very generous nation, and with all the youngsters taking part in food drives, ALS challenges, big brother/sister, habitat for humanity, etc i believe we will continue to be a very generous nation for years to come.


message 9: by jaxnsmom (new)

jaxnsmom | 2408 comments Mod
I think you're probably right on a nationwide basis. My view is colored by all the people I see and hear expecting help from all the aid programs while doing nothing to help themselves. I also see many younger people who think the luxuries are necessities - receiving welfare, WIC and whatever else they can get, while having all the latest technological devices.

I do think this nation is generous in helping people who've been affected by natural disasters, but I've seen programs that depend on contributions having to cut back on services to local causes. I have to admit I've become very cynical because I believe there are too many people abusing the system while those who really need help aren't getting it.


message 10: by Randa (last edited Aug 21, 2014 12:36PM) (new)

Randa | 175 comments Agree. Giving to charity is much easier than having to ask for it for many people, for others not so much. It seems some people start viewing the help as their right and not a gift or sacrifice from others. Where I volunteer I have to focus my heart on those I see who truly appreciate the help received not on those who demand more or question why someone got what they perceive to be more.


message 11: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (debbiejones) I have to say I was really opposed to reading this book. The cover and mystery series title just seemed so cliché to me. I actually really liked it! I'm upset that the second hasn't come out...I looked up the author's facebook page and I think she's having a hard time getting it published.. She said she might actually publish it herself. Also, this is the first time that I've joined a book club on here and actually read both books! Yay!


message 12: by Randa (new)

Randa | 175 comments Jessica wrote: "I have to say I was really opposed to reading this book. The cover and mystery series title just seemed so cliché to me. I actually really liked it! I'm upset that the second hasn't come out...I..."

I never thought to look on an authors facebook page. I do hope she is able to publish the second book as like you I enjoyed this book.

Also welcome Jessica to the book club.


message 13: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (debbiejones) Thank you Randa!


message 14: by jaxnsmom (new)

jaxnsmom | 2408 comments Mod
Jessica wrote: "I have to say I was really opposed to reading this book. The cover and mystery series title just seemed so cliché to me. I actually really liked it! I'm upset that the second hasn't come out...I..."

Welcome, and thanks for making us your first group to join! I hope you'll get to read more group books! I saw you have Bunnicula listed as one of your favorites. It's one of the most original and fun stories I've read.


message 15: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (debbiejones) Yes jaxnsmom...I actually read it when I was 7 or 8.. And still love it till this day!


message 16: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie (quiltsrme) | 40 comments I didn't like the title, but otherwise, I enjoyed the book. I felt the author did quite a bit of research for this book and although the speech mannerisms were not consistent, it did not take away from what I felt were good characters and plot.

My grandmother worked on submarine scopes during the war years. It was very difficult to get her (or the other elderly gals) to talk of those times or their interactions at work. For my grandmother, at least, it brought up anger because she was let go after the war when she WANTED to keep working!


message 17: by jaxnsmom (new)

jaxnsmom | 2408 comments Mod
I think many women were angry and frustrated after the war. They'd been expected to fill in for men and were earning their own money, and the were expected to be content with going back to their old roles. And I'm sure there was a lot of what Rosie went through, in the way the men treated the women.

I was surprised at how much I came to like Clinton Kilbride. I can see he and Rosie developing a good brother and sister type relationship, and I hope he stays involved in the book that will apparently never be published. One thing that really bothered me was (view spoiler)


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