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message 1: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 22, 2018 01:02PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
A few years back the BBC had a similar initiative to find the favorites books in the United Kingdom. They identified the top 200, and then people voted
on the top 21. Before you peek, can you guess which ones were near the top of the list?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big...

Which were your favorites here?
I think I would have voted for many


The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman (The first book was titled 'Golden Compass' in the US)
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J. K. Rowling
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne
Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Captain Corelli's Mandolin by Louis de Bernières
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by Rowling
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by Rowling
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by Rowling
The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
Middlemarch by George Eliot
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
The Story of Tracy Beaker by Jacqueline Wilson
One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
David Copperfield by Dickens
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Persuasion by Austen
Dune by Frank Herbert
Emma by Austen
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
Watership Down by Richard Adams
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Animal Farm by Orwell
A Christmas Carol by Dickens
Far from the Madding Crowd by Hardy
Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian
The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Of Mice and Men by Steinbeck
The Stand by Stephen King
Anna Karenina by Tolstoy
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The BFG by Dahl
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Noughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
A Tale of Two Cities by Dickens
The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough
Mort by Terry Pratchett
The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton
The Magus by John Fowles
Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Pratchett
Guards! Guards! by Pratchett
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
Perfume by Patrick Süskind
The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell
Night Watch by Pratchett
Matilda by Dahl
Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
Ulysses by James Joyce
Bleak House by Dickens
Double Act by Wilson
The Twits by Dahl
I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
Holes by Louis Sachar
Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
Vicky Angel by Wilson
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
Magician by Raymond E. Feist
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel
The Colour of Magic by Pratchett
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
Katherine by Anya Seton
Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer
Love in the Time of Cholera by García Márquez
Girls in Love by Wilson
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome
Small Gods by Pratchett
The Beach by Alex Garland
Dracula by Bram Stoker
Point Blanc by Anthony Horowitz
The Pickwick Papers by Dickens
Stormbreaker by Horowitz
The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth
The Illustrated Mum by Wilson
Jude the Obscure by Hardy
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13¾ by Sue Townsend
The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat
Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
The Mayor of Casterbridge by Hardy
The Dare Game by Wilson
Bad Girls by Wilson
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Shōgun by James Clavell
The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham
Lola Rose by Wilson
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
Reaper Man by Pratchett
Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
Possession: A Romance by A. S. Byatt
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
Danny, the Champion of the World by Dahl
East of Eden by Steinbeck
George's Marvellous Medicine by Dahl
Wyrd Sisters by Pratchett
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
Hogfather by Pratchett
The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan
Girls in Tears by Wilson
Sleepovers by Wilson
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Behind the Scenes at the Museum by Kate Atkinson
High Fidelity by Nick Hornby
It by King
James and the Giant Peach by Dahl
The Green Mile by King
Papillon by Henri Charrière
Men at Arms by Pratchett
Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian
Skeleton Key by Horowitz
Soul Music by Pratchett
Thief of Time by Pratchett
The Fifth Elephant by Pratchett
Atonement by Ian McEwan
Secrets by Wilson
The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
Kim by Rudyard Kipling
Cross Stitch by Diana Gabaldon
Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
River God by Wilbur Smith
Sunset Song by Lewis Grassic Gibbon
The Shipping News by E. Annie Proulx
The World According to Garp by Irving
Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore
Girls Out Late by Wilson
The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye
The Witches by Dahl
Charlotte's Web by E. B. White
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
They Used to Play on Grass by Terry Venables and Gordon Williams
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder
Dustbin Baby by Wilson
Fantastic Mr Fox by Dahl
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
The Suitcase Kid by Wilson
Oliver Twist by Dickens
The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay
Silas Marner by Eliot
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Diary of a Nobody by George and Weedon Grossmith
Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh
Goosebumps by R. L. Stine
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence
The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
Man and Boy by Tony Parsons
The Truth by Pratchett
The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
The Horse Whisperer by Nicholas Evans
A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
Witches Abroad by Pratchett
The Once and Future King by T. H. White
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
Flowers in the Attic by V. C. Andrews


message 2: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments Fewer books that were "pop fiction" there, and they allowed more than one entry per author. Interesting that the process differed.


message 3: by Heather (last edited Jun 07, 2018 02:27PM) (new)

Heather (bruyere) I'm guessing they picked mostly classic and popular British novels but for sure LOTR and Narnia! I find it curious how many kids books are on here.

So many good choices but here are some I couldn't live without:

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley


message 4: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Jun 07, 2018 02:37PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
I moved this over from the other thread. (I mistakenly posted it twice.)

Sheila wrote: "Nice list. Good to see Neil Gaiman make the list"


message 5: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments There are lots of French and Russian classics, as well as some American authors.


message 6: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments And don't call Oscar Wilde "British" in too loud of a voice, lol!


message 7: by NancyJ, Moderator (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Fewer books that were "pop fiction" there, and they allowed more than one entry per author. Interesting that the process differed."

Yes, I think the original list came from all public nominations, rather than segmented in any way. When they ran the poll for the top 21, they added the rule to limit it to one book or series per author.


message 8: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) Love this listing. I remember checking out Katherine by Anya Seton because it was on this list. An incredible read!! I was absorbed and cried at points.


message 9: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 19, 2018 07:45PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Kirsten wrote: "Love this listing. I remember checking out Katherine by Anya Seton because it was on this list. An incredible read!! I was absorbed and cried at points."

Thanks for the rec,. I think I have her on my list too.


message 10: by NancyJ, Moderator (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Bruyere wrote: "I'm guessing they picked mostly classic and popular British novels but for sure LOTR and Narnia! I find it curious how many kids books are on here.

So many good choices but here are some I couldn..."


Thanks for the highlights Heather (Bruyere)
His Dark Materials is one that I need to look up.

Does anyone else have favorites on this list that aren't on our list?


message 11: by Cathy (new)

Cathy (cathy1015) | 54 comments I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world and point of view of the rabbits. There seemed to always be some type of danger in their world which made for a lot of suspense balanced by how much they looked out for each other.

Another favorite on this list that is not on the GAR is The Day of the Jackal which is a fabulous thriller - although my all time favorite of Forsyth is the Odessa File.


message 12: by NancyJ, Moderator (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world and point of view of the rab..."

Until this year, I would have guessed Watership Down was a war or boat movie. It has a lot of fans on goodreads. I'd like to read it.


message 13: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world and point of v..."

When I was a teenager, it seemed a bit long. If I had time to re-read it, I wouldn't mind it now. I remember when I was visiting a friend in a small town in Scotland, actually seeing a warren, right in the middle of a town, close to the riverbank, and recalling that book!


message 14: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments When I was young, I loved "The Secret Garden", and I think I was past the usual age for reading it. James and the Giant Peach was out there, but fascinating. I read a lot of the Black Beauty books when I was young, but that was because I was obsessed with horses, and there were mostly these and the "My Friend Flicka" books. I don't remember anything in particular about the writing.

As an adult, I loved "Far from the Madding Crowd". This is the book that has made me give authors a second chance, since I also hated "The Return of the Native" when asked to read it in hs.
The Hobbit
The Poisonwood Bible
There's a lot of Pratchett on the list, isn't there? And oddly enough, the "Flowers in the Attic" made it as well.


message 15: by Jess (new)

Jess Penhallow | 28 comments I'm not surprised that His Dark Materials is not on the American list given its anti-religion themes. They probably wouldn't go down well with a lot of American readers.


message 16: by Allegra (new)

Allegra | 11 comments So is this list in order or are the top 21 listed elsewhere? I've read many more on the PBS list. I guess I need to discover Terry Pratchett and Jacqueline Wilson. Any suggestions?


message 17: by Parker (new)

Parker | 204 comments Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world and point of view of the rab..."

Watership Down is one of my favourite books too. My husband even had a cat named Fiver.


message 18: by Parker (new)

Parker | 204 comments Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "When I was young, I loved "The Secret Garden", and I think I was past the usual age for reading it. James and the Giant Peach was out there, but fascinating. I read a lot of the Black Beauty books ..."

I attempted to read Black Beauty when I was young, and couldn't get past the abuse. Still haven't read it all the way through.

I discovered The Secret Garden as an adult, and love it.


message 19: by Jess (new)

Jess Penhallow | 28 comments Allegra wrote: "So is this list in order or are the top 21 listed elsewhere? I've read many more on the PBS list. I guess I need to discover Terry Pratchett and Jacqueline Wilson. Any ..."

Jaqueline Wilson books are middle grade she was an author I loved as a preteen. I pretty much got through her whole back catalog between the ages of 9 and 12!

My favourites were Bad Girls, Double Act, The Illustrated Mum, The Suitcase Kid,Vicky Angel and The Lottie Project and of course The Story of Tracy Beaker which is probably her most well known having been made into a CBBC series.

And then you have the Girls series starting with Girls in Love which is aimed at a slightly older age group (like 12-15).

Her books are great because even though they are aimed at children they always deal with kids that are in some really tough situations (foster kids, parents going through a divorce, homeless kids etc) and I found it really taught me a lot of empathy.


message 20: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments Parker wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world and point of v..."

because he's nervous? lol


message 21: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments looking at that list again, it's about 25% books written with young people in mind.


message 22: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 22, 2018 01:37PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Jess wrote: "I'm not surprised that His Dark Materials is not on the American list given its anti-religion themes. They probably wouldn't go down well with a lot of American readers."

I looked it up, and the first book in the series was titled Golden Compass in the U.S. I did hear of it, but I didn't read it or see the movie. (I thought I did, but I think I would remember Nicole Kidman.)

I don't think the majority of Americans worry too much about religion in fantasy books (just my opinion). But if they specifically criticized the Catholic Church, that's a big bear (with assets and lawyers) to poke.

A librarian told me that banning books often backfires. It seems to make people want to read them more, especially teenagers, so it can be good for sales. A few religious groups were vocal about the witchcraft in Harry Potter. As if there weren't already hundreds (or thousands?) of other books for kids/teens with witches and other supernatural characters. I guess HP was a bigger target.


message 23: by NancyJ, Moderator (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Allegra wrote: "So is this list in order or are the top 21 listed elsewhere? I've read many more on the PBS list. I guess I need to discover Terry Pratchett and Jacqueline Wilson. Any ..."

Yes the list is in order. The larger list was in order of the original votes (survey type voting). Then they took the top votes, eliminated author duplicates, and put them into a well publicized vote (like we're doing now), to create a ranking of the top 21.


message 24: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 22, 2018 02:11PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Parker wrote: " Black beauty.. abuse ..."

I loved horse stories when I was a kid. I have warm fuzzy memories of Black Beauty and the book's ending (it gets better). I remember a whole series of horse books. Black Beauty had a big impact on the way people viewed and treated horses. It really helped improve empathy because people could see the world from the horse's viewpoint.

Even as an adult, one of my favorite films is Seabiscuit. I loved the story about the horse, but also about all the people involved. To me, it was about a broken horse and 3 broken men who all put each other back together. It demonstrated a lot of positive psychology principles.


message 25: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 22, 2018 02:20PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Jess wrote: " "

I agree Jess. Maybe that's why I also like books about foster kids, orphans, etc. I didn't experience that myself, but they helped build empathy.

Both the BBC and GAR lists have books that we loved as children. (Unlike lists written by scholars or critics.) For me those books feel more personal somehow. Perhaps because they were reread, and later read to my children. I find myself voting for Charlotte's Web once in a while because of that emotional connection. Tom Sawyer isn't necessarily a children's book, but I loved reading it as a child. I still remember my heart pounding during the exciting parts.


message 26: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments NancyJ wrote: "Parker wrote: " Black beauty.. abuse ..."

I loved horse stories when I was a kid. I have warm fuzzy memories of Black Beauty and the book's ending (it gets better). I remember a whole series of ho..."


haha, how many times have you watched "The Horse Whisperer" and "Hidalgo"?


message 27: by Parker (new)

Parker | 204 comments Linda, I haven't seen either of those films, and I won't. I've worked with abused animals most of my life, and the effects sometimes are lasting.


message 28: by Allegra (new)

Allegra | 11 comments Jess wrote: "Allegra wrote: "So is this list in order or are the top 21 listed elsewhere? I've read many more on the PBS list. I guess I need to discover Terry Pratchett and [author:Jacqueline Wil..."

Thanks for the suggestions, Jess. I like to keep in touch with my pre-teen side, so I'll start looking for one or two to try.


message 29: by NancyJ, Moderator (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Parker wrote: " Black beauty.. abuse ..."

I loved horse stories when I was a kid. I have warm fuzzy memories of Black Beauty and the book's ending (it gets better). I remember a who..."


I read and watched Horse Whisperer, but not Hidalgo. Now that I think about there have been a lot of horse movies. I liked National Velvet, War House, Dreamers, Wild Hearts Can't be Broken, and ? There was a funny bit about horses in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn too.


message 30: by Linda (last edited Aug 22, 2018 05:32PM) (new)

Linda  | 915 comments NancyJ wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Parker wrote: " Black beauty.. abuse ..."

I loved horse stories when I was a kid. I have warm fuzzy memories of Black Beauty and the book's en..."


My orthodontist (who always has Disney films going in his practice, whenever they're open) was amazed that I'd never seen "The Indian in the Cupboard" and says that he always tears up at that scene. I still haven't seen it, but I think it's similar to that scene in Hidalgo.
But in "Hidalgo", (based on a true story), it's just the man who's broken, not the horse.


message 31: by Cathy (new)

Cathy (cathy1015) | 54 comments Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world..."

Wow - I would love to see a rabbit warren. Funny that you see habitats like a prairie dog colony at zoos but not a rabbit warren. Will try to find one if I ever go to Scotland.

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh was another favorite of that genre when growing up.


message 32: by Linda (last edited Aug 23, 2018 03:51PM) (new)

Linda  | 915 comments Cathy wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much dep..."

It just popped up, when we went to feed the ducks on a slow, late summer evening (my friend's a bit older than I, and it's a small town). Truth is, I probably have one where I live now, just don't see that many at one time (I think 4-6 is the max so far). It's an old estate with lots of green space, though I think we had more rabbits before they took down this fantastic old tree in the backyard, in order to roll a house onto the property and plunk it down there.
I remember thinking that there were similarities between the two ages ago when I read it.


message 33: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 23, 2018 04:15PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Cathy wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both time..."

I have no idea what a warren looks like, but there are a lot of rabbits in my area. They make it hard to have a vegetable garden. We're fixing up our old house now and my husband told me that the rabbits moved in after the dog moved out (in the yard, not the house).

My kids used to love feeding ducks in the park. They don't allow it anymore.


message 34: by Linda (new)

Linda  | 915 comments NancyJ wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Cathy wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ..."

yes, people feed them white flour and it's not good for them


message 35: by Cathy (new)

Cathy (cathy1015) | 54 comments Parker wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then again a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. So much depth and creativity in creating the world and point of v..."

Fiver - what a great name for a cat. The rabbit Fiver had a sixth sense and cats are so sensitive and all - it fits.


message 36: by Cathy (new)

Cathy (cathy1015) | 54 comments Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Cathy wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership Down! I read it as a teen and then aga..."

Oh no, as a kid, we fed bread to geese too...glad there is an awareness now about the white flour. I did save a Canadian goose once that was caught in a fishing line (with the help of a park ranger).


message 37: by Linda (last edited Aug 23, 2018 07:25PM) (new)

Linda  | 915 comments Cathy wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Cathy wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I'm a fan of Watership..."

Yeah, I saw I sign when I was in Galway, Ireland a few years back. They've tons of swans down by the harbor and the Spanish Arch. And the sign said they can't digest processed white flour well. Who knew? When I was a kid on the lake, the ducks gobbled it up.....but then, we tossed it into the water, so by the time they got to it, it was pretty soggy, Didn't stop them from coming round for more, lol!
And it doesn't stop, I'll be nice here, pesky seagulls, either. When my niece and her kids visited two weekends ago, they ate their lunch sandwiches and chips in the car. I was driving, so I got the chips. They hit the water immediately, while I tried to cover up our stuff as much as possible, get settled into the beach chair. I'm wearing a visor and holding what I had left of my sandwich literally 4 inches from my mouth (because I know), when I felt a thump on my head and visor, and he made off with the 1/2 or 1/3 that was left! I hope that one got a stomach ache! :D


message 38: by NancyJ, Moderator (last edited Aug 24, 2018 01:26AM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 1835 comments Mod
Cathy and Linda

In one park near me I think the food attracted too many birds, and some were too aggressive with the little kids.

My mother in law used to keep geese. They used to chase the kids and bite their rears. Ouch. On my first visit, they went after my husband but left me alone for some reason.

They lived by the ocean so there were also seagulls. They never got that close to the people when I was there. That would keep me off the beach for sure.


message 39: by Charley Girl (new)

Charley Girl (charleygirl9) | 24 comments NancyJ wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "NancyJ wrote: "Parker wrote: " Black beauty.. abuse ..."

I loved horse stories when I was a kid. I have warm fuzzy memories of Black Beauty and the book's en..."


Loved that bit about the horse in A Tree grows in Brooklyn. LOL!


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