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The Foundling
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Group Reads > The Foundling June 2018 Read: Spoilerland

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Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
Fair warning - this is the spoiler thread!


What did you think?


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
So let me just say that I am completely in love with Gideon.


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1430 comments You’ll have to fight me for him, Critterbee!


message 4: by Susan in NC (last edited Jun 02, 2018 01:56PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments I love how Heyer took the typical Regency hero that she pretty much created, and turned him into an important, but supporting player! Gideon is a great wingman for Gilly, I would’ve loved it if she gave him his own story- but I guess she did, in so many of her other romances (just with different names).


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
Strong, caring, sensitive, loyal, intelligent, great sense of humor!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments And generous- he was willing to stand back and support Gilly, not run his life or push his opinions on him.


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
And generous, too! And able to stand up to his Father, but still be respectful.


message 8: by Jackie (new) - added it

Jackie | 1407 comments oddly, I never thought to be attracted to Gideon but now that you point it out, he IS more like a "leading man" than Gilly is. I love this book for the adventure and the comedy, especially. I was just posting in the first thread how I have come to appreciate the beginning, even though I felt it was too slow back when I first read it but it was so important to show us exactly how the relationship between Gilly and his Uncle starts so we appreciate how it ends up.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Jackie wrote: "oddly, I never thought to be attracted to Gideon but now that you point it out, he IS more like a "leading man" than Gilly is. I love this book for the adventure and the comedy, especially. I was j..."

Yes, on this, my second reading, I am about 2/3 through the book and glad that the comedy still works for me - although I think I’d strangle Tom and Belinda if I were responsible for them!


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1430 comments I like Gilly’s ingenuity in rising to all the challenges that come his way. He really grows by thinking through all the situations.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments I know, makes me so proud! And I love Gideon’s reactions as he follows Gilly’s path and learns how he’s handled things.


message 12: by Nick (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 443 comments I imagine Gideon as a more handsome, younger, James Purefoy.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Perfect - I can see it!


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
For a moment, I was wondering which Heyer book James Purefoy was in, then I realized that it was an actual person!

Ah Gideon, why did you never get your own book? Are you still waiting for me to arrive so we can live happily ever after? /attempts to elbow Abigail out of the way/

I love the interaction when Lord Lionel scolds Gideon for calling Gilly Adolphus.


His father rounded on him. ‘How many more times am I to tell you not to call him by that name?’ he demanded, venting an irritation of spirit that had no relation at all to anything Gideon had said.

‘I must leave that to yourself to decide, sir,’ replied Gideon, willing to draw his parent’s fire.



Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Gideon and his father have a very good, healthy relationship!


message 16: by Nick (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 443 comments Gideon and Gilly - there's another reason why Liversedge is so ridiculous and funny to me. That moment when he assumed that naturally any man with any commonsense would want to murder his cousin in order to inherit his estate! It made me laugh to see Liversedge unable to imagine what it's like to be a normal decent human being.

Actually, I was also pretty amused by how calm Gideon's servant was about the attack, just a very laconic, 'Well, I see you've been astrangling him sir.'


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
Nick wrote: "...It made me laugh to see Liversedge unable to imagine what it's like to be a normal decent human being..."

Unfortunately, however ridiculously, outrageously over the top Liversedge's character is, I see people who are like him in the world. I wonder if he is based on a person from Heyer's life, or if he is completely from her imagination.


message 18: by Nick (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 443 comments I daresay people like him do exist - I've been lucky enough never to encounter someone like that in real life! To the best of my knowledge, I've never known a real life groomer, murderer, blackmailer, or kidnapper. Surely such people are quite rare.

I still haven't got round to reading the Heyer biography - if anyone's read that they might be able to shed some light on the inspiration for this novel.


message 19: by Jackie (new) - added it

Jackie | 1407 comments Nick wrote: "Gideon and Gilly - there's another reason why Liversedge is so ridiculous and funny to me. That moment when he assumed that naturally any man with any commonsense would want to murder his cousin in..."
yes, I agree with this post, and it's nicely put @Nick (that@ sign doesn't do anything does it? well it lets you know who I meant, anyway. ;-)


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments No real criminals for me, either, Nick! (Hooray)

And I love Gideon's man Wragby, too; "What! Are we going to take this rasher of wind with us?" He gets some of the best lines in the book!


message 21: by Jackie (new) - added it

Jackie | 1407 comments yes, he does; I love Wragby


Teresa | 1840 comments I loved it!! The cant was brilliant in this one. I do so love that in Heyer's books. Whatever about Tom, I'd definitely have strangled Belinda. What a ninny!! Poor Mudgley. I don't know what kind of life he's going to have.


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments It cracked me up, too, that as soon as anyone talked to Belinda, they wanted to strangle her. It says a lot for Gilly that he didn't abandon her!


Teresa | 1840 comments Gaylord is another one I'd like to flatten. Gosh I'm being very aggressive tonight!!


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Spoiled & arrogant - not my favorite qualities!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Belinda was aggravating, but when she was telling Gilly and Harriet about being a foundling and knowing she was alone in the world - not whining, just sad acceptance- I felt their compassion for her and felt slightly guilty for wanting to strangle her...


Teresa | 1840 comments I think you might be alone there Susan :-)


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Fair enough.


Teresa | 1840 comments ;-) :-) That's a real Irish statement you've come out with there. Sure you haven't Irish blood in you???????


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments I have!


Teresa | 1840 comments Knew it!!!! Welcome to the family:-):-)


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Thanks!


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments You know, that's true, Susan. I think if I actually met someone like that I would feel sorry for her, since she wasn't whining or complaining. I'm not saying I'd enjoy a day spent in her company, mind you...


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Well, no, but when I really thought about it, I realized how hard it would be to be an orphan back then (especially a beautiful, albeit not terribly bright orphan...)


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Especially hard for the not-bright!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Yes! And men were constantly pursuing her - might be fun and flattering to be a diamond of the first water if you had a fond papa and doting dragon of a mama to guide and guard you, but if you were on your own, yikes!


QNPoohBear | 1436 comments Susan in NC wrote: "Yes! And men were constantly pursuing her - might be fun and flattering to be a diamond of the first water if you had a fond papa and doting dragon of a mama to guide and guard you, , but if you were on your own, yikes! ."

I agree. If you dig deeper, Belinda is an example of the darker side of Regency life. Her low IQ also puts her in harm's way. Having empathy for her doesn't mean the reader doesn't want to strangle her though!


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Strangely enough, she's also humble. She doesn't seem to notice her beauty!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Exactly, PoohBear and Karlyne! I was so relieved that they found her nice farmer, but I thought it was very insightful, what Harriet said, about her never really being capable of “caring profoundly for anyone. It is very sad!” But as Gilly so wisely points out, she may always be silly, but Mudgley isn’t overly nice in his sensibilities and they should deal well together - I hope so, I was relieved they had a safe place to unload Belinda! I couldn’t imagine what else might happen to her with the likes of Gaylord lurking, purple dress notwithstanding.


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments And she would never have been able to take care of herself after her beauty was gone - I don't see her being able to handle investments or money, for instance. Not a drop of avarice in her make-up, and if she'd become a ladybird, she would have needed some.


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Karlyne wrote: "And she would never have been able to take care of herself after her beauty was gone - I don't see her being able to handle investments or money, for instance. Not a drop of avarice in her make-up,..."

Exactly.


message 42: by Nick (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 443 comments Yes, I was slightly surprised by everybody's heartless acceptance of Belinda's fate: 'Oh well, she's just Haymarket Ware, what can you expect?' It was rather cruel!


Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3722 comments Nick wrote: "Yes, I was slightly surprised by everybody's heartless acceptance of Belinda's fate: 'Oh well, she's just Haymarket Ware, what can you expect?' It was rather cruel!"

That’s what made me pity her; as annoying as she was, everyone was ready to write her off! Honestly, with her willingness to go off with anyone who promised her gifts, I’m surprised she managed to stay so innocent for so long.


message 44: by Jackie (last edited Jun 11, 2018 08:09AM) (new) - added it

Jackie | 1407 comments Nick wrote: "Yes, I was slightly surprised by everybody's heartless acceptance of Belinda's fate: 'Oh well, she's just Haymarket Ware, what can you expect?' It was rather cruel!"

yes, except Gilly! and, just maybe, Gideon did some thinking about it after Gilly told him off on the subject. granted, with Gilly at least some of it was pride - he had made himself responsible for her and was angry at interference - but it was also, clearly, largely compassion. He is not just a Duke, but a good man.


message 45: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy (aggieamy) | 422 comments I was just thinking that Gilly could have been in real trouble setting that door on fire when he was locked in the cellar. It easily could have been him dying of smoke inhalation in there. I wonder if that was a bit of a plot hole for GH not to think of it or if a room that size takes longer than I think to fill up with smoke?


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "I was just thinking that Gilly could have been in real trouble setting that door on fire when he was locked in the cellar. It easily could have been him dying of smoke inhalation in there. I wonder..."

I wondered that, too!


Teresa | 1840 comments Yes it was something that puzzled me too. It could have gone horribly wrong.


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments It was one of those do-or-die things where you are apt to suddenly think "I could have died!". With a big gulp.


message 49: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 111 comments Amy wrote: "I was just thinking that Gilly could have been in real trouble setting that door on fire when he was locked in the cellar. It easily could have been him dying of smoke inhalation in there. I wonder..."

That never really seemed plausible to me. I enjoyed the rest of the book anyway, but that bit - I kind of had to ignore my doubts. The door might have been too damp to burn. It might have burned so briskly he would have been burned getting through it. Or he might have suffocated. I mean, really, setting fire to the only exit??


Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2745 comments Mod
Maybe his recent head injury was affecting his thinking.


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