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Circe > Circe: Sir-see or Kir-kee?

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message 1: by Veronica, Supreme Sword (new)

Veronica Belmont (veronicabelmont) | 1729 comments Mod
I need to know before next week! 😬


message 2: by Mer (new)

Mer | 187 comments S


message 3: by Sean Lookielook (last edited May 24, 2018 02:39PM) (new)

Sean Lookielook Sandulak (seansandulak) | 433 comments It's "keer-key" in the original Greek

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXW5w...

but it is often pronounced as "sur-see" in English. Either is correct. #teamsoftc

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/def...


message 4: by Ben George (new)

Ben  George | 66 comments Sir-see = greek
Kir-kee = roman

I don't know which fits the book better.


message 5: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 4282 comments Ancient Greek pronunciation is like "keer-kair." Most commonly it's pronounced "Sirsea" today.

At the link below, I most liked this comment:
"In ‘murrican English it is 'SUR-see.' In Greek it is 'KEER-keh.'"
https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-pron...

'Murica!


message 6: by David H. (new)

David H. (farrakut) If you say Caesar "See-sir," you should say Circe "Sir-see."

I don't think there are sufficient Greek or Roman purists to get enough people to say it in the original manner--whenever I do, it always seems strange unless I know they're doing it for effect.


Ian (RebelGeek) Seal (rebel-geek) | 840 comments I’m going to pronounce it like Cersei Lannister.


message 8: by Veronica, Supreme Sword (new)

Veronica Belmont (veronicabelmont) | 1729 comments Mod
OK, Cersei it is!


message 9: by TraceyL (new)

TraceyL | 76 comments The audiobook says Sir-See


message 10: by Phil (last edited May 24, 2018 05:10PM) (new)

Phil | 1186 comments Oops, I've been saying it in my head like it rhymes with "fierce".


message 12: by Mark (new)

Mark (markmtz) | 2593 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "Murica!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0exi2...


message 13: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8962 comments “Dara”


message 14: by William (new)

William | 434 comments Say it like King Arthur's maritime champion: Sir Sea

Btw there were many other often forgotten knights, I've always been a fan of that well rounded character - Sir Cumfrence, but we should never forget the ever-sure Sir Tain or, of course, that great drinking champion - Sir Osis of DaLiver.


message 15: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (last edited May 24, 2018 10:28PM) (new)

Tassie Dave | 3677 comments Mod
I would have assumed Circe was a fairly well known character from Greek legend :-?

It's always been Sir-See in every remake of the Ulysses/Odysseus legend that I've seen.

If you want some fun with pronunciation, try saying the name of the island she lives on in the Myth without looking it up ;-)

Aeaea


message 16: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8962 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "Aeaea "

Named by the person who discovered it while simultaneously stepping on a sharp rock.


message 17: by Dara (new)

Dara (cmdrdara) | 2702 comments Trike wrote: "“Dara”"

Points! I should read this book and make so many threads just to have fun with V. :-D


message 18: by Brendan (new)

Brendan (mistershine) | 930 comments Trike wrote: "Named by the person who discovered it while simultaneously stepping on a sharp rock."

My first thought on reading that name in the story last night went immediately to Monty Python's "Castle of AUGHHHH".


message 19: by Mark (last edited May 25, 2018 07:34AM) (new)

Mark (markmtz) | 2593 comments Found this pronunciation guide for the Odyssey

http://www.wfbschools.com/faculty/psi...

Whitefish Bay School District (Wisconsin) educators are on Team Sirse ;P


message 20: by Mark (new)

Mark (markmtz) | 2593 comments Mark wrote: "Found this pronunciation guide for the Odyssey

http://www.wfbschools.com/faculty/psi...

Whitefish Bay School District (Wisconsin) educators are on Team Si..."


Which leads to this interesting page of audio pronunciation guides for Greek & Roman mythology

http://www.classics.upenn.edu/myth/ph...


message 21: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments It's Kir-kay, just like it's Ki-ker-o and Kai-zar.


message 22: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments Mark wrote: "Found this pronunciation guide for the Odyssey

http://www.wfbschools.com/faculty/psi...

Whitefish Bay School District (Wisconsin) educators are on Team Si..."


They also think the "ch" in Charybdis is pronounced like church instead of Bach, so ...


message 23: by Phil (new)

Phil | 1186 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "I would have assumed Circe was a fairly well known character from Greek legend :-?

It's always been Sir-See in every remake of the Ulysses/Odysseus legend that I've seen.

If you want some fun wit..."


I'm familiar with the character from reading but I don't think I've ever seen a movie or tv show with her in it.


message 24: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1254 comments I think her name should be said like “Sir Sea” and the island is “Aye-Aye-a” (like aye aye cap’n)


message 25: by Stephen (last edited May 25, 2018 10:57AM) (new)

Stephen Richter (stephenofskytrain) | 1391 comments Hello,
Here is Madeline Miller reading a snippet from my favorite 2018 book.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMAl3...

" Truth is, men make terrible pigs."

I love this book!!!!!


message 26: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8962 comments Stephen wrote: "Hello,
Here is Madeline Miller reading a snippet from my favorite 2018 book.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMAl3...

" Truth is, men make terrible pigs."

I love this book!!!!!"


Well, there you go, straight from the Greek scholar’s mouth.


message 27: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (last edited May 25, 2018 03:19PM) (new)

Tassie Dave | 3677 comments Mod
Trike wrote: "Tassie Dave wrote: "Aeaea "

Named by the person who discovered it while simultaneously stepping on a sharp rock."


Obviously ;-)

Sean wrote: "It's Kir-kay, just like it's Ki-ker-o and Kai-zar."

How do you say Celtic? I prefer the hard C - Keltic to the soft c - seltic.

Phil wrote: "I'm familiar with the character from reading but I don't think I've ever seen a movie or tv show with her in it."

My favourite was the 1954 movie Ullysses with Kirk Douglas as Ullysses

Silvana Mangano as Circe

description

That movie was on high rotation on my local TV station during the 60s and early 70s. I loved it as a kid :-)

The 1997 TV mini series The Odyssey was good with Armand Assante as Odysseus and the lovely Bernadette Peters as Circe

description

There have been several other adaptations over the years, but they are the 2 that I remember the best

This wikipedia page lists a few other shows and literature she has been a character in:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circe_i...


message 28: by Sean Lookielook (new)

Sean Lookielook Sandulak (seansandulak) | 433 comments I used to say sell-tic (Celtic) and ser-bur-us (Cerberus) but now I lean toward the hard c for those. "Circe" looks to much like "circle" for me to easily change though.

I'm always torn between being culturally and historically accurate, and trying not sound like a pretentious, pedantic twit.


message 29: by Julie (new)

Julie (3x5books) | 110 comments I feel like if Miller wanted us to pronounce it in the Greek way, she would have done some Edward McCrorie-style transliteration (e.g Akhilleus, Kuklops, Huperion, "They found the home of Kirke soon in a hollow:/shining stone, raised quite high, with a broad view,")


message 30: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new)

Tassie Dave | 3677 comments Mod
Mark wrote: "Found this pronunciation guide for the Odyssey

http://www.wfbschools.com/faculty/psi..."


They went with Ay-ay-uh for Aeaea :-?
I've always known it as Ay-ee-ah, and prefer it that way.

They have some strange pronunciations:

Scylla = Skill-uh, instead of Sill-ah
Poseidon = Po-sigh-uh-den, instead of Po-sigh-den
Charybdis = Chuh-rib-dis, instead of Cah-rib-dis


message 31: by Gary (new)

Gary I've always pronounced it either "Sir C" or "Ser Sea." Take your pick. You could say "Sirs E" if you're all exotic, I guess.


message 32: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 4282 comments Sean Lookielook wrote: "I'm always torn between being culturally and historically accurate, and trying not sound like a pretentious, pedantic twit."

THIS! So much this!


message 33: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8962 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "Mark wrote: "Found this pronunciation guide for the Odyssey

http://www.wfbschools.com/faculty/psi..."

They went with Ay-ay-uh for Aeaea :-?
I've always known it as Ay-ee-ah, and prefer it that way...."


...and now I have the Donnie Iris song stuck in my head.

https://youtu.be/YH5Arbm47IQ


message 34: by Mark (last edited May 25, 2018 08:28PM) (new)

Mark (markmtz) | 2593 comments Will Wonder Woman make an appearance?

Wonder Woman vs. Circe




message 35: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 4282 comments My intro to Sersi was in the Eternals comic by Kirby. Regrettably no good pix of just Sersi seem to be available, so here's a page from one of the comics.

sersi_eternals


message 36: by Phil (new)

Phil | 1186 comments Ah, I forgot about her. She was a member of the Avengers for a while.


message 37: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (j-boo) | 322 comments I've always heard it with the soft C sound, so that's how I said it (in my head) while reading this book. Yes, just like Cersei Lannister :) But I am no Greek scholar.


message 38: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments Tassie Dave wrote: "
How do you say Celtic? I prefer the hard C - Keltic to the soft c - seltic. "


Keltic is the only acceptable way, basketball fans be damned.

They went with Ay-ay-uh for Aeaea :-?
I've always known it as Ay-ee-ah, and prefer it that way.


Shouldn't it be Ee-ee-ah, though?


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) | 2898 comments I'd go with how the author says it!

https://youtu.be/IMAl3ex7NPY


message 40: by Mark (last edited May 28, 2018 03:02PM) (new)

Mark (markmtz) | 2593 comments Will The Return of Circe by Nat Schachner be the August Sword pick?




message 41: by Baelor (new)

Baelor | 169 comments Ancient Greek is Kir-kay.

Ancient Greek also aspirated ph and ch, and th, so “philosophia” would have been pronounced “pee-lo-so-pee-ah” with slight expulsions of air after the “p” sounds.

Classical Latin had unvoiced sibilants, so Caesar would have been pronounced Kye-sar, not Kye-zar.


message 42: by Veronica, Supreme Sword (new)

Veronica Belmont (veronicabelmont) | 1729 comments Mod
Trike wrote: "Stephen wrote: "Hello,
Here is Madeline Miller reading a snippet from my favorite 2018 book.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMAl3...

" Truth is, men make terrible pigs."



I am content!


message 43: by Erik (new)

Erik Melin | 114 comments I think Aeaea is pronounced with a Wilhelm scream


message 44: by Joseph (new)

Joseph | 2333 comments By coincidence, I accidentally joined a Facebook discussion on the proper pronunciation of "drow" that's now up to about 1,000,000 comments.


message 45: by William (new)

William | 434 comments Joseph wrote: "By coincidence, I accidentally joined a Facebook discussion on the proper pronunciation of "drow" that's now up to about 1,000,000 comments."

OK...wow.


message 46: by Brendan (new)

Brendan (mistershine) | 930 comments William wrote: "OK...wow."

Were you rhyming your post with "drow"?


message 47: by Joseph (new)

Joseph | 2333 comments William wrote: "Joseph wrote: "By coincidence, I accidentally joined a Facebook discussion on the proper pronunciation of "drow" that's now up to about 1,000,000 comments."

OK...wow."


Which, by further coincidence, is the preferred pronunciation. (Me, I have to admit I pronounce it to rhyme with "show" because I learned bad habits in my youth.)


message 48: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (last edited May 30, 2018 12:59PM) (new)

Tassie Dave | 3677 comments Mod
I quite often get into friendly pronunciation arguments on forums.

Recently in a homophone discussion I argued, correctly, that bored, board, bawd and baud are homophones.

Others argued that bored & board are of each other only, and bawd and baud are of each other only.

Somehow these people vocalise the "R" in both bored & board , which is weird and as one of those words is my surname I should know how to pronounce it ;-)


message 49: by Tasha (new)

Tasha Well. Most Americans would vocalize those "R"s. Hard. They are not homophones to me.


message 50: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 4282 comments ^ In Boston Tassie Dave would be completely correct, but the words would all have two syllables. ;)


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