Reading the Chunksters discussion

53 views
Moby Dick > Moby Dick - Chapters 1-16

Comments Showing 1-50 of 200 (200 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4

message 1: by Dianne (last edited Dec 30, 2017 06:35PM) (new)

Dianne There are so many tidbits to each of these chapters that I am just going to post some notes as I go along. Please feel free to post your thoughts on the entire week's reading if you would like, or respond to individual chapter posts. The idea is to encourage a lively discussion, so feel free to ask questions, post pictures, digress about related topics, etc. And Happy New Year everyone! What a great way to start 2018! So happy to have you all here.

description


message 2: by Dianne (last edited Dec 30, 2017 11:00AM) (new)

Dianne Chapter 1 - Loomings

From the first line, "Call me Ishmael," we are all invited to have a close relationship with the narrator. It is remarkable how that one line alone can set the tone for the entire book, and draw the reader in as a confidante.

We learn that Ishmael takes to sea as a more pleasant alternative to suicide, it seems, and that he is an outcast/drifter independent type, but a humble one at that, saying, "who ain't a slave," after all.

Melville himself was drawn towards the sea multiple times due to a similar ennui. He was involved in the “Young America” movement, a group of writers and thinkers from the 1840s who declared their own restlessness as a political principle.


message 3: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Chapter 2 - The Carpet-Bag

Why what on earth is a carpet bag, you may ask? Well wiki tells us the following:

A carpet bag is a traveling bag made of carpet, commonly from an oriental rug. They were a popular form of luggage in the United States and Europe in the 19th century.

Sooo, yeah, that would be strange looking today. In any event, our Ishmael wanders the streets looking for lodging and ends up at the Spouter Inn, run by the ominously named Peter Coffin. Hmmm. That's certainly not foreboding.

Digression alert: While Ishmael contemplates the dubious looking nature of the Spouter Inn, he thinks about the story of Lazarus and the rich man (known as Dives), from the Gospel of Luke. In that story, Lazarus lay outside the rich man’s house for many days, and the rich man gave him no food or money—after both died, however, the rich man found that Lazarus received divine care, and the rich man did not. Perhaps now Ishmael feels better about staying in such a sketchy looking abode, and he ventures in.


message 4: by Dianne (last edited Dec 30, 2017 06:35PM) (new)

Dianne Chapter 3 - The Spouter Inn

I don't think this chapter was intended to imply a homosexual relationship between Ishmael and Queequeg. I'll just start out with that. I could be wrong, but that's not where I think Melville was going with this. I suspect that bunking with others was probably fairly common at this time. I wasn't sure if the reference to Queequeg as a "dark-complexioned chap" was intended to be particularly racist. While I am sure that there was general concern about 'heathens' who often served as harpooners, I think Ishmael was pretty open-minded, noting that it was better to sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian.

In any event, Ishmael enters the inn and considers a painting that he cannot decipher the subject of. He decides it is a ship with a whale jumping on it. Hmmm. Peter notes he can stay in a bed with Queequeg, but Ishmael is doubtful and only agrees when he tries out a bench to sleep on and finds out it won't work. Considering Peter has just told him his roomie is out peddling shrunken human heads, Ishmael's concern was pretty justified, I think!

description


message 5: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Dianne wrote: "A carpet bag is a traveling bag made of carpet, commonly from an oriental rug. They were a popular form of luggage in the United States and Europe in the 19th century.
."


Perhaps the equivalent in purpose, though not in form, of the backpack today. Luggage for the common person, for whom traditional trunks or leather suitcases were expensive.


message 6: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "A carpet bag is a traveling bag made of carpet, commonly from an oriental rug. They were a popular form of luggage in the United States and Europe in the 19th century.
."

Perhaps th..."


ah ha, thanks Everyman! That makes more sense.


message 7: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings.."

There's something ominous about that title, isn't there? What is looming and over whom?

But my Norton edition says that the term in nautical use meant land or ships beyond the horizon, dimly seen by reflection in peculiar weather conditions.

It seems likely that Melville carefully chose this title for his opening chapter, but what are we to take from it?


message 8: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Dianne wrote: "There are so many tidbits to each of these chapters that I am just going to post some notes as I go along. Please feel free to post your thoughts on the entire week's reading if you would like, or ..."

I appreciate this approach since I will be reading somewhat slowly over the course of the week.


message 9: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Dianne wrote: "Chapter 3 - The Spouter Inn

I don't think this chapter was intended to imply a homosexual relationship between Ishmael and Queequeg. I'll just start out with that. I could be wrong, but that's no..."


I agree with you. Sleeping several to a bed was not uncommon in cheaper inns. As was sleeping on benches, which was his first idea, but they didn't fit him.


message 10: by Dianne (last edited Dec 30, 2017 06:35PM) (new)

Dianne Chapters 4-6: The Counterpane, Breakfast, The Street

Chp 4 - Queequeg shaving with his harpoon shows Ishmael that his rooomate is as much “half-savage" as he is "half-civilized," noting in fact that he might be the less civilized of the two.

Chp. 5 - Ishmael proves himself a good sport when he thinks that Peter may have been joking with him over the choice of his roommate, noting that "a good laugh is a mighty good thing, and rather too scarce a good thing; the more's the pity." Ishmael breakfasts with other whalers and is surprised to find them so silent. Queequeg, apparently more familiar with the whaling lifestyle, does not seem to be surprised by it. Ishmael is fascinated by Queequeg's tattoos - I wonder what the meaning of the heavy tattoos was?

Chp. 6 - The brief chapter is more or less an ode to New Bedford, and all of the fine richness in the town that can be attributed to the whaling industry. In addition, Ishmael notes that in any major dock you would be likely to find a wide variety of people from around the world.

description


message 11: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings.."

There's something ominous about that title, isn't there? What is looming and over whom?

But my Norton edition says that the term in nautical use meant land ..."



Excellent question! I found this from a college course syllabus addressing the possible meanings of the chapter title Loomings:

Explore the multiple meanings of "Loomings," the title of the first chapter. In what ways does the first chapter introduce the reader to key motifs that will resonate throughout the rest of the work? Think about these concepts, many of which will turn up later on:

The "loom," weaving, and making mats.
Imagery of lines, interconnectedness, community, and danger
Water meditations and man's attraction to water
Ishmael's curiosity about and tolerance for human motivation
Ishmael as an actor in a drama not of his choosing; the stage as metaphor
The white whale and foreshadowings of his presence
Community and isolation; the "Isolato"; solitude
The quest
Interpretation, translation, and "reading" correctly
Madness and monomania
The nature of God and man
Finding and losing the self (Narcissus)
Irony, irreverence, obedience
Parallels between land and sea
Mechanical power (Ahab) versus (or as representing) the power of the natural world
Traditional image of ship as both a factory and a microcosm of society--a "ship of fools"
Civilization and "savagery"; cannibalism
Biblical echoes and references: Jonah, Job, Ahab, Elijah, Ishmael, etc.


message 12: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "There are so many tidbits to each of these chapters that I am just going to post some notes as I go along. Please feel free to post your thoughts on the entire week's reading if you ..."

no problem! This book lends itself to a very detailed discussion, I hope everyone is game!


message 13: by Dianne (last edited Dec 30, 2017 07:01PM) (new)

Dianne Chapters 7 and 8 - The Chapel and The Pulpit

Chapter 7 - The Chapel - In the chapel Ishmael sees the memorial tablets of sailors who have died whaling, and is confronted with the high risk of mortality in his chosen profession. Queequeg is also in the chapel, which surprises Ishmael. Ishmael is not frightened however, for he thinks that people have largely mistaken "this matter of Life and Death" and that his soul, "what they call my shadow here on earth is my true substance" and that if his body is taken, that is not him.

Chapter 8 - The Pulpit - Ishmael watches Father Mapple enter the chapel and climb onto the pulpit using a rope ladder. The pulpit is shaped like the prow of a whaling ship, and effectively separates Father Mapple from the congregation. He wonders if this act of physical isolation signifies his spiritual withdrawal from all outwardly ties and connections. He notes that it is apt that the pulpit is like the prow of a ship, for "the world's a ship on its passage out, and not a voyage complete; and the pulpit is its prow."


message 14: by Paula (last edited Dec 30, 2017 07:52PM) (new)

Paula (paula-j) | 388 comments I'm writing from my iPad, which seems woefully unequal to the task, but I don't want to stir from my comfy armchair and the glow cast by my Christmas tree.

Anyway, I will do the best I can.

Why have I never read this book? What has been wrong with me all these decades? It is a book I could have read and reread many times and still found small gems that eluded me in previous readings.

First and foremost, Melville's prose. It is perfection. Clean, clear, intelligent, elegant. And the way he orchestrates every word, sentence, and paragraph. Just take the first chapter, we know we are in the hands of a master.

What do we know of Ishmael? We know he identifies himself as a wanderer, perhaps a little lost in himself and his surroundings, prone to depression, which he copes with by following the tug of his longings to the sea.

We know he is an intelligent, educated man. Look at the myriad of references to history, myth, geography, philosophy, and of course the Bible (as is obvious from the name he has chosen for himself). In just the first chapter, we find references to Cato, Narcissus, Seneca, the Stoics, the Fates, Patagonia, the Persians, the Greeks, Pythagoras. And, he doesn't parrot something he heard, no. He understands the references and allusions he makes. He deeply understands them. And his humor. It isn't the humor of a rough, uncultured man. It is refined and deftly expressed. And beautifully timed. His Pythagorean maxim joke is something you almost miss, or puzzle over. But when you catch it, how much you appreciate this man.

I love the sense of movement in the first chapter when Ishmael describes the longing that all creatures have for water. There is action and movement in each paragraph: "Circumambulate the city", "Thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reverie", "But look! Here come more crowds", "Take almost any path", "Should you ever be athirst in the great American desert", "Go visit the prairies in June".

He takes us on an evocative grand tour of America in two pages, filled with movement, excitement, discovery, and searching. Always a restless searching.

Who is this man? Has Ishmael been lording it as the country schoolmaster, making the tallest boys stand in awe of him? His words persuade me that he is. "The transition is a keen one, I assure you, from schoolmaster to a sailor, and requires a strong decoction of Seneca and the Stoics to enable you to grin and bear it. But even this wears off in time."

With regard to the title of Chapter 1: Loomings. I think Ishmael gives us the interpretation in the last paragraphs, where he talks of the Fates as the invisible police officer who has the constant surveillance of him, where the Fates sometimes make the decisions we think we are making ourselves.

And that last sentence, so filled with the portent of what lies ahead:

"...the great floodgates of the wonderworld swung open, and in the wild conceits that swayed me to my purpose, two and two there floated into my inmost soul [an allusion to Noah's Ark?], endless processions of the whale, and, mid most of them all, one grand hooded phantom, like a snow hill in the air."

The white whale. The first allusion to the great Moby Dick.


message 15: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Paula wrote: "I'm writing from my iPad, which seems woefully unequal to the task, but I don't want to stir from my comfy armchair and the glow cast by my Christmas tree.

Anyway, I will do the best I can.

Why ..."


Great comments. Yes, I'm sure that the two by two is indeed a reference to Noah's Ark.

I do wonder how many of the classical and biblical references are really to be attributed to Ishmael and how many to Melville as author. It would be a rare man of his age who would have all those references at his fingertips.


message 16: by Tracey (last edited Dec 30, 2017 08:29PM) (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings

From the first line, "Call me Ishmael," we are all invited to have a close relationship with the narrator. It is remarkable how that one line alone can set the tone for the en..."


I am interested in the way Melville phrased this first line. Is Ishmael his actual given name? Saying, Call me, makes me think that this is not his real name but his assumed name. Like saying, Call me Methuselah, if a person is very old. Was he (the character) taking on the mantel of Ishmael, an outcast, exile, wandering soul. Right from the start Melville is setting the stage. A brilliant first line right alongside, Marley was dead, to begin with.


message 17: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) Dianne wrote: "Chapters 7 and 8 - The Chapel and The Pulpit

Chapter 7 - The Chapel - In the chapel Ishmael sees the memorial tablets of sailors who have died whaling, and is confronted with the high risk of mort..."


I loved the description of the chapel and the it's interior decor with it's pulpit and rope ladder and painting representing a gallant ship in a terrible storm. Does this depict the world and the gospel a pulpit into which we can climb and pull up the ladder for respite when needed?
'Yes, the World's a ship on it's passage out, and not a voyage complete; and the pulpit is its prow.'
The prow is the forward most part of the ship that cuts through the water. Are these thoughts Melville had during long hours on ship?


message 18: by Christopher (new)

Christopher (Donut) | 80 comments Sorry, we need a better picture of Queequeg:






message 19: by Paula (new)

Paula (paula-j) | 388 comments Tracey wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings

From the first line, "Call me Ishmael," we are all invited to have a close relationship with the narrator. It is remarkable how that one line alone can set the ..."


I rather think Ishmael is an assumed name. And it makes me wonder why he feels he needs one.


message 20: by Paula (new)

Paula (paula-j) | 388 comments Everyman wrote: "Paula wrote: "I'm writing from my iPad, which seems woefully unequal to the task, but I don't want to stir from my comfy armchair and the glow cast by my Christmas tree.

Anyway, I will do the best..."


It's a good question. I suppose that's one of the reasons why I assumed Ishmael was a schoolmaster. A thoughtful, sensitive, educated person, leading a solitary existence, perhaps reading a great deal, who feels the need to tell his story in writing, might well have accumulated such knowledge.

I love the two by two reference. So evocative of that isolated Ark upon those storm tossed waters, and Noah never really knowing if dry land would ever really manifest.


message 21: by Paula (new)

Paula (paula-j) | 388 comments Christopher wrote: "Sorry, we need a better picture of Queequeg:

"


These are great!


message 22: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 3 - The Spouter Inn

I don't think this chapter was intended to imply a homosexual relationship between Ishmael and Queequeg. I'll just start out with that. I could be wrong..."


Firstly, as Paula said, I can't believe I haven't read this before - I'm loving it!

To pick up, though, on the relationship between Ishmael and Queequeg: I agree that it's not simply what we would term a homosexual one but I equally don't think that it's just a throwaway case of strangers forced to share a bed (Ishmael points out himself that even on ships, sailors have their own bunks). Instead, it seems to challenge cultural ideas of what relationships between men, could be:

And when our smoke was over, he pressed his forehead against mine, clasped me round the waist, and said that henceforth we were married.

Thus, then, in our hearts' honeymoon, lay I and Q - a cosy, loving pair.

We had lain thus in bed, chatting and napping at short intervals, and Q now and then affectionately throwing his brown tattooed legs over mine.

Yet see how elastic our stiff prejudices grow when once love comes to bend them. For now I liked nothing better than to have Q smoking by me, even in bed, because he seemed to be full of such serene household joy then.


If one of the themes of travel literature is the exploration of how what seems 'natural' is really culturally-constructed, then Ishmael is already abandoning previous 'stiff prejudices'. I'm looking forward to seeing how this relationship plays out.


message 23: by Julie (new)

Julie | 33 comments In slight panic mode as I haven't even started yet!


message 24: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Julie wrote: "In slight panic mode as I haven't even started yet!"

No worries Julie, just join in whenever you get a chance to read the sections! We got a bit of an early start anyways.


message 25: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Christopher wrote: "Sorry, we need a better picture of Queequeg:

"


Thank you!


message 26: by Dianne (last edited Dec 31, 2017 04:42AM) (new)

Dianne Chapter 9 - The Sermon

I remember hating this chapter when I read it in college, but you know I really appreciate it so much now!

Father Mapple bases his sermon on the Bible's Book of Jonah. A link to that is here, and I also posted in the allusions and references thread. Jonah is referred to throughout the book, so may be worth a read.

http://www.blakleycreative.com/jtb/Te...

As Father Mapple tells it, Jonah attempts to flee God's wrath by sailing across the world, and the captain suspects his guilt but is happy to grant him passage for a large sum. The ship encounters a violent storm and the crew decides it is Jonah's fault. He tells them to throw him overboard to save themselves and eventually they agree. Jonah is swallowed by a whale, and believes himself totally deserving of this fate. God is pleased with Jonah's sincere repentance and allows him to escape from the whale.

Father Mapple uses his sermon to admonish his congregation to sincerely repent of their sins, as Jonah did, and also to obey God's commands. Father Mapple notes, "and if we obey God, we must disobey ourselves; and it is in this disobeying ourselves, wherein the hardness of obeying God consists." The captain's agreement to grant Jonah passage out of selfishness/greed is also worth noting.


message 27: by Dianne (last edited Dec 31, 2017 04:52AM) (new)

Dianne Chapters 10 and 11

Chapter 10 - A Bosom Friend

Ishmael and Queequeg become almost soul mates in this chapter, and Ishmael notes that "You cannot hide the soul." Ishmael shares in Queequeg's religious observations, and the narrator notes that both men are discovering that evil exists among Christians at least as much as among pagans.

Chapter 11 - Nightgown

The bond of the two men is cemented in what seems to be deep commitment and brotherly love. I still don't think this is intended to be a romantic relationship? Ishmael also observes that the rich cannot fully appreciate what they have, using the analogy of rich people with a fire always lit who cannot truly appreciate warmth unless they can peek a toe out of warm blanket into the cold.


message 28: by Dianne (last edited Dec 31, 2017 05:32AM) (new)

Dianne Chapters 12-15

Chapter 12 - Biographical

In this chapter we learn Q is the son of a king on the South Pacific island of Kokovoko, which is “not down on any map; true places never are.” He seeks to sail the world. When Ishmael asks if he would return to become king, he responds that his exposure to Christians had made him "unfit" to ascend the "pure and undefiled" pagan throne. However, it is clear that Q is a very stoic, moral man, and not susceptible to the debauchery of other sailors.

Chapter 13 - Wheelbarrow

In this chapter Melville continues to portray the relativity of cultures and what is socially acceptable, giving anecdotes of his lack of understanding of western culture and vice versa. A story is also told of Q saving a boy who was knocked overboard on the Moss and had, earlier that day, been making fun of him.

Chapter 14 - Nantucket

This chapter was a bit of a digression in which Ishmael notes how important Nantucket was to the whaling industry and the US economy during the time. He notes that a Nantucketer “owns” the seas and that this “empire,” covering two-thirds of the globe, is larger than that of any country.

Chapter 15 - Chowder

Peter Coffin has referred our pair to an inn owned by his cousin, the Try Pots. There they meet Mrs. Hussey, who is taking care of the inn. Ishmael is disturbed by the picture of two gallows on the inn's signpost, just as he was by Peter Coffin’s name on the Spouter Inn sign.


message 29: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Chapter 16 - The Ship

Q agrees to follow Ishmael on whatever ship he selects. Ishmael selects the Pequod, and after being grilled by Peleg about his lack of whaling experience, consults with Peleg and Bildad about his pay, which is decidedly paltry. Peleg has referred to Captain Ahab as the captain of the ship, noting that he is a "grand, ungodly, god-like man" and that after a whale bit off his leg he has become "a kind of moody - desperate moody, and savage sometimes." However, he notes that this moodiness would "pass off" and observes that he has married a sweet girl and has a young child. Ishmael does not meet Ahab at this time, and is left with a certain sympathy, awe and sorrow for him.


message 30: by Dianne (last edited Dec 31, 2017 05:33AM) (new)

Dianne Everyman wrote: "Paula wrote: "I'm writing from my iPad, which seems woefully unequal to the task, but I don't want to stir from my comfy armchair and the glow cast by my Christmas tree.

Anyway, I will do the best..."


it's a good point, I can't imagine that Ishmael could have been as erudite as he seems, and he is certainly not rich and probably not particularly educated to a high degree. Still, Melville seems to portrays some of the thoughts as Ishmael's?


message 31: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Roman Clodia wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 3 - The Spouter Inn

I don't think this chapter was intended to imply a homosexual relationship between Ishmael and Queequeg. I'll just start out with that...."



I love these comments, Roman Clodia, and I think what is difficult here is that Melville portrays a close relationship between men that is not typical in western culture. The term 'bosom buddies' perhaps approaches it but still does not do it justice. These men have shared all that they have with each other, are willing to die for each other. They have a deep love of each other, stemming from the best impulses of humanity and the love of mankind.

I also liked the reference to "how elastic our stiff prejudices grow" due to love, and isn't that so true? Isn't it so easy to let things slide when you love someone? And more difficult if you don't!


message 32: by Dianne (last edited Dec 31, 2017 05:23AM) (new)

Dianne Tracey wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings

From the first line, "Call me Ishmael," we are all invited to have a close relationship with the narrator. It is remarkable how that one line alone can set the ..."


good question Tracey! I had thought it was more to establish a relationship with the reader rather than to refer to an assumed name. Still - this particular name is almost too appropriate! So maybe you and Paula are onto something! As for why he needs one, he seems to be wanting to escape his life.. why, we don't quite know.


message 33: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Tracey wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapters 7 and 8 - The Chapel and The Pulpit

Chapter 7 - The Chapel - In the chapel Ishmael sees the memorial tablets of sailors who have died whaling, and is confronted with the hi..."


I'm not sure if the people can get into the pulpit. I think the ladder was there so the 'leaders of men' could pull the ladder away and separate themselves from the rest of the people!


message 34: by Dianne (last edited Dec 31, 2017 05:31AM) (new)

Dianne Paula wrote: "I'm writing from my iPad, which seems woefully unequal to the task, but I don't want to stir from my comfy armchair and the glow cast by my Christmas tree.

Anyway, I will do the best I can.

Why ..."


Wiki notes the following about the Fates, or Moirai:

In Greek mythology, the Moirai , often known in English as the Fates, were the white-robed incarnations of destiny; their Roman equivalent was the Parcae (euphemistically the "sparing ones"). Their number became fixed at three: Clotho (spinner), Lachesis (allotter) and Atropos (literally 'unturnable' but metaphorically 'inflexible' or 'inevitable' - i.e. death).

They controlled the mother thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction. The gods and men had to submit to them, although Zeus's relationship with them is a matter of debate: some sources say he is the only one who can command them (the Zeus Moiragetes), yet others suggest he was also bound to the Moirai's dictates. In the Homeric poems Moira or Aisa, is related with the limit and end of life, and Zeus appears as the guider of destiny. In the Theogony of Hesiod, the three Moirai are personified, daughters of Nyx and are acting over the gods. Later they are daughters of Zeus and Themis, who was the embodiment of divine order and law. In Plato's Republic the Three Fates are daughters of Ananke (necessity).

description


message 35: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1319 comments Oh my goodness, it’s not even the 1st yet and I feel behind already! 😧

Hopefully I can start today, even if it’s just a few pages.


message 36: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings.."

I don't know how to embed photos from Twitter into a Goodreads post, but there's a tweet this morning from @NWSWPC:

Interesting atmospheric refraction phenomena observed this morning across the Bozeman Valley. This is a mirage called a "Fata Morgana", or "looming". This occurs due to a strong temp inversion of warmer air above much colder air creating a "stretched" image of far away objects.


message 37: by Mark (new)

Mark André Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings

From the first line, "Call me Ishmael," we are all invited to have a close relationship with the narrator. It is remarkable how that one line alone can set the tone for the en..."


I not sure I read any sense of the narrator contemplating suicide. I think the narrative suggests he is more inclined to murder. I do love the phrase: "judiciously buttered, and judgmatically salted".


message 38: by Mark (last edited Dec 31, 2017 01:04PM) (new)

Mark André Dianne wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings.."

There's something ominous about that title, isn't there? What is looming and over whom?

But my Norton edition says that the term in nautica..."

The only one here that makes a modicum of sense to me would be #6, foreshadowing.


message 39: by Mark (new)

Mark André Paula wrote: "I'm writing from my iPad, which seems woefully unequal to the task, but I don't want to stir from my comfy armchair and the glow cast by my Christmas tree.

Anyway, I will do the best I can.

Why ..."

I find the narrator more annoyed than depressed. - )


message 40: by Christopher (last edited Dec 31, 2017 02:05PM) (new)

Christopher (Donut) | 80 comments

revised: Also known as "fata morgana"




message 41: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 885 comments Roman Clodia wrote: "
If one of the themes of travel literature is the exploration of how what seems 'natural' is really culturally-constructed, then Ishmael is already abandoning previous 'stiff prejudices'. I'm looking forward to seeing how this relationship plays out. "


There is also his comment that Q is more civilized in his conduct than many purportedly civilized Westerners.


message 42: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Flynn | 73 comments Thus far I have learned that I know nothing about Mythology and I am far less versed in the Bible than I thought I was. But I did learn what pea coffee is. “Roasted peas boiled in water”. Sounds tasty. Shudder. I do like some of the play on words “Spouter Inn”. “Peter Coffin” foreshadowing what lies ahead

Stephanie


message 43: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Linda wrote: "Oh my goodness, it’s not even the 1st yet and I feel behind already! 😧

Hopefully I can start today, even if it’s just a few pages."


no worries for those of you just starting! Plenty of time and threads will stay open. I won't start any new threads until the night before the new week at the earliest.


message 44: by Christopher (new)

Christopher (Donut) | 80 comments Dianne wrote: "Melville portrays a close relationship between men that is not typical in western culture."

It depends on what you mean by "not typical."

It is certainly at the heart of The Iliad- the close relationship between Achilles and Patroclus

Are you saying this kind of 'comradeship' is more typical in non-Western civilizations?


message 45: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Stephanie wrote: "Thus far I have learned that I know nothing about Mythology and I am far less versed in the Bible than I thought I was. But I did learn what pea coffee is. “Roasted peas boiled in water”. Sounds ta..."

that does sound disgusting!


message 46: by Julie (new)

Julie | 33 comments The Spouter Inn, Peter Coffin - almost Dickensian!


message 47: by Christopher (last edited Dec 31, 2017 02:52PM) (new)

Christopher (Donut) | 80 comments Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings.."

I don't know how to embed photos from Twitter into a Goodreads post, but there's a tweet this morning from @NWSWPC:

Interesting atmospheric refraction pheno..."


I'll try:




message 48: by Julie (new)

Julie | 33 comments Taking it right back to Chapter 1, I wonder if our narrator 'Ishmael' simply sees himself as a bit of a loner/outcast? After all, Ishmael was passed over for Isaac as Abrahams heir. This would tie in with his wanting to live apart from society as a sailor rather than on land.


message 49: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Julie wrote: "The Spouter Inn, Peter Coffin - almost Dickensian!"

good catch Julie! It is!


message 50: by Dianne (new)

Dianne Christopher wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Dianne wrote: "Chapter 1 - Loomings.."

I don't know how to embed photos from Twitter into a Goodreads post, but there's a tweet this morning from @NWSWPC:

Interesting atmospheric..."


Thanks Christopher! I just learned how to post pictures myself, and I admit I don't excel at it. I tried this one and failed so much appreciated!


« previous 1 3 4
back to top