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message 1: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments Did anyone hear Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories on Radio 4 this evening? I found it very moving. The poem about elephants & skeletons was brilliant.


message 2: by nocheese (last edited Oct 12, 2017 01:47PM) (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments No I didn't, but I do like the idea of a wireless thread. Anybody been listening to 'Hamlet' at 3pm all this week Radio 4?


message 3: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments nocheese wrote: "No I didn't, but I do like the idea of a wireless thread. Anybody been listening to 'Hamlet' at 3pm all this week Radio 4?"

Sadly, Lez, I'm at work at 3 pm.

I'm meaning to catch up with Radio 4's Russia programmes from this week when I get time (I'm working all weekend, so I don't know when that will be). I've been complaining all year about the lack of programmes about the reformation (began with Luther's 95 theses on 31 Oct 1517) and the Bolshevik revolution (Oct 1917), so I'd better listen to what has been offered.


message 4: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments Gordon wrote: "nocheese wrote: "No I didn't, but I do like the idea of a wireless thread. Anybody been listening to 'Hamlet' at 3pm all this week Radio 4?"

Sadly, Lez, I'm at work at 3 pm.

I'm meaning to catch..."


I'm not Lez, but that's OK. I've been listening to the dramatisation of 'Ten Days That Shook the World' this week, Very good.


message 5: by Gordon (last edited Oct 12, 2017 02:47PM) (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments nocheese wrote: "I've been listening to the dramatisation of 'Ten Days That Shook the World' this week, Very good."

I'll try to catch up with that. I heard a bit of a programme on Monday morning where Muscovites (or possibly Petersgburgers) were being vox-popped and it was apparent that they knew as little about Russian history as people in most other countries know about theirs. I did find myself wondering quite how a country like Russia would think its young people should learn about events of 100 years ago.

I saw a movie several years ago called Das schreckliche Mädchen ("The Nasty Girl") about a young woman in Passau (I think) investigating the wartime records of some local civic dignitaries and finding her investigations blocked at every turn by seemingly respectable men with lots to hide. Post-war (West) Germany always struck me as a country that wanted its youngsters to know exactly what their parents' & grandparents' generations had done, but even with that kind of will there were obviously lots of vested interests to be protected. I don't think Russia has that kind of will for openness at any level.

EDIT: Sorry, I just accidentally overwrote my previous reply. This was supposed to be a new message.


message 6: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments Radio 3 next Saturday at 10.00pm
Kraftwerk tribute

HCMF40
Hear and Now

Sara Mohr-Piestch and Robert Worby are live from Bates Mill Blending Shed in Huddersfield for the first in a series of programmes from this year's 40th anniversary Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival. The programme features music from the arch-experimentalist ensemble zeitkratzer and their tribute to the iconic German band Kraftwerk, with live performances of numbers from their critically acclaimed albums "Kraftwerk" and "Kraftwerk 2". Also on the programme, a premiere of music by James Dillon from the Scotland-based Red Note Ensemble and the latest news of highlights from this year's festival.

Kraftwerk: Ruckzuck; Spule 4; Strom; Atem; Klingklang; Megaherz
Performed by zeitkratzer:

James Dillon: Tanz/haus: triptych 2017 (World Premiere)
Performed by the Red Note Ensemble:


message 7: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments Twice today I have heard a presenter on Radio 4 use the word 'hommage'. This morning it was Jonathan Guyer talking about 'Arab Noir' literature, and now Mariella Forstrup has done it on her book programme. In both cases they said it in that emphatic tone so that you hear the inverted commas.
What is going on? What is wrong with 'homage'? I'm just about reconciled to it in film discussion, because the concept of directors referencing the work of others originated in France (I think). Perhaps they are being ironic, and they just mean 'copying'?
Rant over, although I may write to Feedback.


message 8: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments Newsreaders also delight in rolling "entrepreneur" off their tongues giving it their best French flair and emphasising the last syllable. I know it's taken from the French but we don't all start rolling our rs in "restaurant". "Entrepreneur" as used in English does not have an -e on the end so it doesn't have to be pronounced as entrepreneur-r-r-r-e. Another rant over.


message 9: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments You’ve been away from Scotland a long time, Val. They all delight in rolling every r available. This is not a criticism, I’d love to be able to but find it physically impossible. I particularly like ‘girrrrls’ and ‘worrrld’.
I love Americans saying ‘entreprenooer’ and ‘chantoose’.


message 10: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments Most of my observations are based on fictional TV series but it seems to me the Scots are all living/working in England and Scotland is populated by the English. I also worry that regional accents are being ironed out, probably as a result of travel/migration, immigration, and television. The distinct Scouse accent has had its unique edges rubbed off (IMO) and West Country accents seem nowhere near as broad as they once did. I watched a documentary where Dunkirk survivors were interviewed and one native of Devon/Somerset(?) was "aaring" like something out of Thomas Hardy. Are there any Cockneys left? I know it's evolution but it seems to be happening so fast.


message 11: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments "Throw The 'R' Away"

I've been so sad
Since you said my accent was bad
He's worn a frown
This Caledonian clown

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

Some days I stand
On your green and pleasant land
How dare I show face
When my diction is such a disgrace

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

You say that if I want to get ahead
The language I use should be left for dead
It doesn't please your ear
And though you tell it like a leg-pull
It seems your still full of John Bull
You just refuse to hear

Oh what can I do
To be understood by you
Perhaps for some money
I could talk like a bee dripping honey.

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

You say that if I want to get ahead
The language I use should be left for dead
It doesn't please your ear
And though you tell it like a leg-pull
I think your still full of John Bull
You just refuse to hear

He's been so sad
Since you said his accent was bad
He's worn a frown
This Caledonian clown

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away
Flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

The Proclaimers


message 12: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments I knew The Proclaimers were good for something.

To tell the truth, I am a bit of a fan, even though they were humourless when I saw them playing last year.


message 13: by Tech XXIII (new)

Tech XXIII  | 6436 comments whit yez sayin' aboot r's roll?


message 14: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments Is that what the posh folk call toilet paper?


message 15: by Lez (last edited Nov 17, 2017 02:49AM) (new)

Lez | 7490 comments 😀

Val, when I go out with nc and co, I have to tune in to each one separately as they’re all from different areas and have noticeably different accents. If I miss the first sentence I’m lost! Sometimes they’ve had to translate for me.
I used to think naïvely and stupidly that there was one generic Scots accent. Sorry! I never did fathom out Andy from Alloa’s conversations.🤔
As for Scousers, there are still plenty of genuine accents around on the quiz shows but they’re often of the Cilla Black variety rather than the ‘normal’ Paul McCartney one.

Gordon: there’s a letter in today’s Guardian about our bête noir, ‘lartay’ for latte. Perhaps it’ll start a discussion.


message 16: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments I'm very glad to hear that Lez. After campaigns for real ale, etc., maybe there can be one for preserving local accents. However, without casting too many aspersions, would it be fair to say your companions are all of "a certain age", like Sir Paul, in which case the accent they grew up with may no longer be as distinct among Gens X and Y and the millennials.


message 17: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments One of my (many) bêtes noir is "would of", "should of", "could of", etc. Wasting one's breath to correct them.


message 18: by Lez (last edited Nov 17, 2017 10:53AM) (new)

Lez | 7490 comments Val wrote: "One of my (many) bêtes noir is "would of", "should of", "could of", etc. Wasting one's breath to correct them."

Another of mine is ‘lon-jer-ay’ for lingerie. Often used by well-educated people who should know better. Can just about understand ‘lon’ but In what alternative universe can ‘ie’ become ‘ay’? Completely inexplicable and shouting at the telly annoying😡


message 19: by Tim (new)

Tim Franklin | 8582 comments Lez wrote: "😀

Val, when I go out with nc and co, I have to tune in to each one separately as they’re all from different areas and have noticeably different accents. If I miss the first sentence I’m lost! Some..."


Back in the day when the kid version of me used to go with dad in the Landrover, we occasionally met up with an old retired gamekeeper. Dad could chat with him ok, but I couldn't understand a word he said, his Bedfordshire accent was so thick!


message 20: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments I beg to differ with the writer of the Guardian letter; even mispronounced as described, 'latte' doesn't rhyme with 'party', unless you throw the 'r' away.


message 21: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments Lez wrote: "Gordon: there’s a letter in today’s Guardian about our bête noir, ‘lartay’ for latte. Perhaps it’ll start a discussion."

There were several comments along the same lines under the original story on the Guardian web site. In fact, I was about to post one myself when I realized someone had already said exactly what I was going to say.


message 22: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments Lez wrote: "As for Scousers, there are still plenty of genuine accents around on the quiz shows but they’re often of the Cilla Black variety rather than the ‘normal’ Paul McCartney one. "

I don't know whether you ever get back to Liverpool, Lez. I go there fairly regularly (although it's only once a year now) and hear a lot of very strong Scouse accents: much stronger than anything I hear on television or radio.

Jimmy Carr used to do a routine about how he practised regional accents. To get into speaking Scouse he would have to start by saying "I want some chicken, and a can of Coke." (Try it: it works). He then got into role, saying "I'm on the rob. I wanna get somethin' for me gran's birthday. She's thirty."


message 23: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments Tim wrote: "Back in the day when the kid version of me used to go with dad in the Landrover, we occasionally met up with an old retired gamekeeper. Dad could chat with him ok, but I couldn't understand a word he said, his Bedfordshire accent was so thick! "

As the brummie scion of geordie parents and extremely broad geordie grandparents I can sympathize.

Where I grew up was full of people who had moved from all over the country to find jobs at the car factory. Our next-door neighbour was from South Wales, the local drunk was from Peterhead (not a stereotype at all, of course), etc. The man across the road was from rural Wiltshire. Moy guard, oi cudden undestaaan a wood e sid.


message 24: by C'est mo (new)

C'est mo (cestmo) | 288 comments It annoys me, I don't know why, when I hear Americans say 'fake noooos', ignoring the 'W'.


message 25: by Isabella (new)

Isabella | 989 comments I've found this in print more often than speech but the American use of "chaise lounge" for "chaise longue" really gets me going...


message 26: by Gordon (new)

Gordon (skiiltan) | 2936 comments Isabella wrote: "I've found this in print more often than speech but the American use of "chaise lounge" for "chaise longue" really gets me going..."

And as for their use of "I could care less" when they mean "I couldn't care less"...

I hear lots of people on the BBC saying "You can't underestimate the importance of..." when they mean either "You can't overestimate the importance of..." or "You mustn't underestimate the importance of..."


message 27: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments Time for another mention for the worst of all, ridiculous, stupid and just plain wrong:

Humanitarian: disaster, crisis, tragedy, catastrophe.

Dictionary definition : benevolent, decent, humane.

Incorrectly used by world leaders and top people in every walk of life, news readers, TV presenters, writers ..........

I feel a rising fury, just writing this!


message 28: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments All of the above, plus 'I miss not ..." eg "I miss not having a dog"


message 29: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments I apologise for repeating this, but my hackles rise every time I hear "decimate". To lose one tenth is much better than a total wipe-out. Writers of news bulletins love to use it in regard to hurricanes, locust plagues, etc.

In regard to pronunciation (not pronounciation as many would have it), our television (politicians, sportsmen/women, newsreaders) would have you believe we live in Austraya.


message 30: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments On ya 'Straya!

This was my Australian friend's reaction to the recent vote re gay marriage.


message 31: by Isabella (new)

Isabella | 989 comments And "Can I get a latte?" Well no, I'm paid to get the coffee for you and there's no way you can come round here in your outdoor clothes and compromise our hygiene rating.


message 32: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments nocheese wrote: "On ya 'Straya!

This was my Australian friend's reaction to the recent vote re gay marriage."


Syllables, words, who needs them? If we can make it shorter, we will!

Top result but it wasn't a vote, it was a voluntary "postal survey" conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (who did such a wonderful job at the last census!?!) A$122 million for what should have been a straightforward piece of legislation presented to Parliament years ago. Hopefully it will be passed by both Houses before Christmas.


message 33: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments I’m completely bereft now Masterchef Australia’s finished. Learnt lots of expressions and grew to know all the contestants. Infinitely better than our version. Only the ‘upspeak’ is a bit irritating.


message 34: by Helen The Melon (new)

Helen The Melon | 2654 comments Isabella wrote: "And "Can I get a latte?" Well no,......"

Makes me swivel my eyes when people say expresso!!


message 35: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments Helen The Melon wrote: "Isabella wrote: "And "Can I get a latte?" Well no,......"

Makes me swivel my eyes when people say expresso!!"


😀😀😀👍


message 36: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments I’ve now heard the first 3 of the new series of ‘I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue’ and have hardly managed a laugh. Sadly, I think they’re struggling and the end could be nigh 😢


message 37: by suzysunshine7 (new)

suzysunshine7 | 14592 comments I've been listening to a repeat of "Bedsit Disco Queen: How I Grew Up and Tried to Be a Pop Star" written and read by Tracey Thorn of 'Everything But The Girl' on Radio 4Extra - and I really want to say that I'm enjoying it but, to be honest, I'm finding her completely flat and quite unemotional vocal delivery of so many rather uninteresting details to be a little too monotonous and I keep on tuning out of listening to it after a few minutes until I suddenly rouse myself into realising it has just finished. And I also remember now that I had the same problem with it the last time that it was on the Radio.

It's disappointing because I usually prefer the far more personal touch of being told a good story and the Book has been well-rated on it's Reviews - but I think that, if I do find myself starting to get more interested, then I'll just get the Book and read it myself instead.


message 38: by Val (last edited Feb 16, 2018 07:07AM) (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments suzysunshine7 wrote: "I've been listening to a repeat of "Bedsit Disco Queen: How I Grew Up and Tried to Be a Pop Star" written and read by Tracey Thorn of 'Everything But The Girl' on Radio 4Extra - and..."

I felt exactly the same way about the book. She may as well have been copying the articles her mother kept in a scrapbook. The first couple of chapters were quite interesting when she spoke of how her interest in popular music grew and her first two bands, but after that it was all downhill. If you want the book Suzy, I'll gladly send you mine but I think there are far more interesting books out there. And don't get me started on hubby Ben Watt's Romany and Tom: A Memoir - all I heard was whinge, whinge, my parents are getting older and I've got better things to do than run after them. When it comes to parental memoirs, Rodney Crowell's Chinaberry Sidewalks leaves them all in the dust.

EDIT: I should say that on the subject of Ben and Tracey's books, I am in the complete minority. Both have had stellar reviews. Sometimes it may be a case of everybody's out of step but our Johnny. But I sometimes wonder if we were all reading the same book.


message 39: by suzysunshine7 (new)

suzysunshine7 | 14592 comments Nah, I think that I'll pass on this one, Val, but thanks very much indeed for the very generous offer all the same ... x x x

I was more drawn to the title and, while I like a few of their best Hits, that's about as far as my interest really goes in her and in the Band.

Actually, I don't tend to want to ever get all that into 'knowing' any more about a lot of the Artistes, Bands, and Music that I am genuinely into - I kind-of just really like them, and their Music, and that's usually more than enough for me ;o>

I was only curious because it might possibly have reminded me of, and reflected on, some my own childhood memories of the 70's - but there was nothing at all in it that I could connect with or relate to.

I shall have to check out Rodney Crowell as I've never heard of him?


message 40: by Val (new)

Val H. | 13901 comments suzysunshine7 wrote: "Nah, I think that I'll pass on this one, Val, but thanks very much indeed for the very generous offer all the same ... x x x

I was more drawn to the title and, while I like a few of their best Hit..."


I think I was drawn to Tracey's book by the strong reviews rather than any interest in her life or times. BUT, she will always remain one of my favourite female singers of all time. I love her voice. And as a fellow Christmas addict, I highly recommend her album "Tinsel and Lights".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinsel_...

You don't have to like country music to enjoy Rodney Crowell's book - it stands alone firmly. And it is not about him and his career, it is about his parents and their life in the 30s and 40s in Texas. But you should know that he is a first-rate singer and songwriter and that he was married to Johnny Cash's daughter Rosanne for a good while.

I fell in love with his autobiographical songs:

The Rock of My Soul
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlA5R...
The First Time I Heard Johnny Cash Sing "I Walk The Line"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjbqM...

You may remember his song Stars on the Water (1981) which was a bit of a crossover hit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IeP6...

But if you don't like country music, I'm unlikely to convert you. But the book's still excellent!!!


message 41: by suzysunshine7 (new)

suzysunshine7 | 14592 comments Country Music is definitely on my list of likes, Val ;o>

How could I possibly not like it when it has some of the very best ever Song Titles and Lyrics around?! I keep a list of my favourites and often post them up on the 'Song Theme Link' Thread ... Hee, Hee, Hee!!! ;o>


message 42: by Sera69 (new)

Sera69 | 1564 comments This list amused me no end...

http://www.tonmeister.ca/personal/geoff/stuff/funny/country.html

Mama Get The Hammer (There's A Fly On Papa's Head)
My Tears Have Washed "I Love You" Off The Blackboard Of My Heart
The Pint of No Return
Bridge Washed Out, I Can't Swim and My Baby's on the Other Side


message 43: by Tech XXIII (new)

Tech XXIII  | 6436 comments classics, but they can't call it a list without chinga chavin's 'cum stains on my pillow (where your sweet head used to be)'


message 44: by suzysunshine7 (new)

suzysunshine7 | 14592 comments ... ! ... ;oO


message 45: by Grizzlygrump (new)

Grizzlygrump | 5021 comments I prefer 'You're The Reason Our Kids Are Ugly' :)


message 46: by Tim (new)

Tim Franklin | 8582 comments How about

My Inlaws Made An Outlaw Outta Me
It Ain't Far To The Bar, But It Sure Is A Long Way Back


message 47: by Lez (new)

Lez | 7490 comments Next Thurs. 8th March. Radio 4 6.30

A new series of Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy with the original cast.


message 48: by nocheese (new)

nocheese | 6128 comments Lez wrote: "Next Thurs. 8th March. Radio 4 6.30

A new series of Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy with the original cast."


Well, the original Arthur, Ford Prefect and Zaphod anyway :)


message 49: by Lez (last edited Mar 04, 2018 06:02AM) (new)

Lez | 7490 comments Sorry, I didn’t read the cast list, it was just verbatim from a Radio 3 announcement. 🤓
Edit:

The Voice of the Book - John Lloyd
Arthur Dent - Simon Jones
Ford Prefect - Geoff McGivern
Zaphod Beeblebrox - Mark Wing-Davey
Trillian/Tricia McMillan - Sandra Dickinson
Trillian - Susan Sheridan
Random - Samantha Béart
Jeltz/Wowbagger - Toby Longworth
Constant Mown - Andy Secombe
Left Brain/Thor - Mitch Benn
Fenchurch - Jane Horrocks
Hillman Hunter - Ed Byrne
Cthulu - Jon Culshaw
Marvin Jim Broadbent
The Guide Mk II - Professor Stephen Hawking
The Consultant - Lenny Henry
Heimdall/Barzoo/Buckeye Brown/Eccentrica/Gunner Vogon - Tom Alexander
Aseed Preflux/Sub-Etha voice/HOG Door - Philip Pope
Modgud/The Viking - Theo Maggs
Baldur - Phillipe Bosher
Announcer - John Marsh


message 50: by suzysunshine7 (last edited Apr 14, 2018 08:02AM) (new)

suzysunshine7 | 14592 comments Is it just me? ... I've been listening to The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy on Radio 4Extra - and I sat there in complete silence without so much as even a twitch of a smile and the only thing I felt about it all at the end was just rather empty and sad? ;o<

Peter Jones really WAS the Book and Stephen Moore really WAS Marvin ... and the modern day Comedians cast in the new version just seem to lack that something special (and also funny) in their vocal characterisations that I can't seem to get past somehow.

I think that I was probably simply spoilt forever by the absolutely wonderful original version with it's amazing cast ;o> ... and I really wish that it had been decided to repeat that utterly unforgettable original Radio Series instead of recording and then broadcasting this rather lacklustre and quite unmemorable one.


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