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Crime and Punishment
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Crime and Punishment > Crime and Punishment - Part II

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message 1: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
Discuss Part II here


message 2: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
Lot's of freaking out going on right now. If you can do the time, you shouldn't do the crime!


message 3: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
Pretty much part two is starting of with each chapter introducing a new character. In fact, the end of each chapter seems to be a final sentence like "And then, so-and-so walked in".


message 4: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
One of the most "Well, duh!" quotes ever, "Blood was pouring from his head and face; his face was crushed, mutilated and disfigured. He was evidently badly injured."


Brooklyn (BrooklynJoe) | 30 comments I'm not sure if anyone besides you and me are reading this book LOL - but I am enjoying. I would have prefered a different translation but find the story riveting and page-turning. It was a little slow to start but once the murder took place - I was hooked and am reading quickly now.


message 6: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
Joe wrote: "I'm not sure if anyone besides you and me are reading this book LOL - but I am enjoying. I would have prefered a different translation but find the story riveting and page-turning. It was a little ..."

Which translation did you go with? Looks like Constance Garnett was my translator.

I'm in the very middle of the book and kind of mired in some discussion that does not seem to be advancing the plot, but is instead a platform for the author to share his beliefs. It is reminding me of the end of The Jungle (if you have read that, hopefully you get what I mean).


Brooklyn (BrooklynJoe) | 30 comments Yes I'm reading Constance but I wanted to read pevear and volokhonsky because they did a great job with Anna karenina- I think the philosophizing is part of Russian literature - there was a lot in Anna karenina and War & peace - I think you just have to slog through those parts


Brooklyn (BrooklynJoe) | 30 comments And yes I did read the jungle - I guess you mean the social commentary - it's ok once you get used to it!


message 9: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
Joe wrote: "And yes I did read the jungle - I guess you mean the social commentary - it's ok once you get used to it!"

Basically - but, not so much as social commentary for the sake of the story, but actual propaganda from the author. The difference between these two things is slight!


message 10: by Phil (new) - rated it 5 stars

Phil Jensen | 17 comments Matthew wrote: "One of the most "Well, duh!" quotes ever, "Blood was pouring from his head and face; his face was crushed, mutilated and disfigured. He was evidently badly injured.""

Can you give me a chapter for that quote? I'd like to compare it to the P&V translation.


message 11: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
In mine, it is the end of the third paragraph of Part II, Chapter 7


message 12: by Phil (new) - rated it 5 stars

Phil Jensen | 17 comments Here you go: "Blood was flowing from his face, from his head. His face was all battered, scraped, and mangled. One could see that he had been run over in earnest."

I'm not sure what it means to be run over in earnest, but otherwise I like this translation better.


message 13: by Matthew, Assistant List Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Matthew (funkygman007) | 1073 comments Mod
Phil wrote: "Here you go: "Blood was flowing from his face, from his head. His face was all battered, scraped, and mangled. One could see that he had been run over in earnest."

I'm not sure what it means to be..."


I like this better, too - it sounds less redundant!


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