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The Ocean at the End of the Lane
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Group Reads > July Group read #1 The Ocean at the End of the Lane

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Latasha (latasha513) | 6807 comments Mod
July's winner is The Ocean at the End of the Lane. Read, discuss, have a great time! Please use spoiler tags.


Rafael da Silva (Morfindel) | 462 comments I already read this book, so I will not read with you, I can't remember much about it.


Lena | 1408 comments https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

I really hated this book but I'm 90% sure I'm diving into Speaks the Nightbird next month.


Latasha (latasha513) | 6807 comments Mod
I've read this one too. Actually, I've read all 3 that won for July.


Mixofsunandcloud | 605 comments I am probably joining as a re-read. I've only read this one once, which is unusual for a Neil Gaiman book.


Kimberly (Kimberly_3238) | 4771 comments Mod
I ordered a copy, so I'll be joining in on this one (already read SPEAKS THE NIGHTBIRD recently).


message 7: by Nichole (new)

Nichole Perani | 2 comments I read this already. Not bad,
But I won't reread.


message 8: by Jon (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jon | 2 comments Thanks for the message!
Grabbed my copy today so look forward reading. Have never read a Neil Gaiman novel before - so a Gaiman virgin! If the cover is anything to go by - looks good! x


message 9: by hkc (new) - rated it 5 stars

hkc | 4 comments Enjoy all! It's a fun little book x


Shannon (ShannonDIsbell) | 92 comments i read this book few months back and i really loved it first book i also ever read from this person and i will be reading more from him


Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 402 comments I have had this book FOREVER and haven't yet started it-- everything of Neil Gaiman's that I have read in the past I have not really....enjoyed. I KNOW! I KNOW! Blasphemy! The thing is, I WANT to like his work, so hopefully this will be the one to do the trick, eh? --Jen from Quebec :0)


Kimberly (Kimberly_3238) | 4771 comments Mod
Jennifer Lynn wrote: "I have had this book FOREVER and haven't yet started it-- everything of Neil Gaiman's that I have read in the past I have not really....enjoyed. I KNOW! I KNOW! Blasphemy! The thing is, I WANT to l..."

I haven't been able to "get into" everything I've read from him, either. Since this is my first time with this title, I'm hoping it's a good one!!


Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 402 comments Although, I DID really love my graphic novel version of CORALINE...--Jen from Quebec :0)


message 14: by Matt (new) - rated it 4 stars

Matt | 22 comments Ordered this today...now I just need to find the time to read it this month!


message 15: by Badseedgirl (last edited Jun 30, 2017 09:31AM) (new) - added it

Badseedgirl | 281 comments This book has been sitting on my shelf for a year. Time to dust it off (don't judge me I've been working 60+hours a week for the last year) and start reading this.
Unlike China Miéville, Neil Gaiman is not a darling of the awards committees, but for some reason I always assumed he was lots of people have a negative view of his works. I do enjoy his books but I have mostly read his YA works.


Maria Hill AKA MH Books (MariaHillDublin) | 50 comments I have just finished it. This is more magical realism, fairy tales and myths than horror. I suspect that not everyone will like the ending either. But for me, this was a five-star read. Perfect.


Kimberly (Kimberly_3238) | 4771 comments Mod
I'm still waiting for my copy to come in, but hope to join in next week. :)


Josen (JosenS) | 69 comments Maria wrote: "I have just finished it. This is more magical realism, fairy tales and myths than horror. I suspect that not everyone will like the ending either. But for me, this was a five-star read. Perfect."

I'm only 50 pages in but it's definitely magical realism. Surprised to find it in the horror genre.


message 19: by Sinead (new) - added it

Sinead Sweeney | 1 comments Looking forward to reading this haven't read anything of his in years last one I think was the graveyard book.


message 20: by S.J. (new)

S.J. Budd | 15 comments I've already read this, but up for reading it again!


Verthandi Wonka (vbwonka) | 5 comments Happy July! I'll be starting this one today. So exciting! :)


Maxine Marsh | 844 comments I started this to see what it would be like and join the group read, and finished in just a few days. I found it compelling, really liked it but it was rather short. I can't wait to see what you guys think!


Josen (JosenS) | 69 comments Even though I'm not a huge fan of magical realism I ended up really liking this book. I like Neil Gaiman's writing. While he has to be descriptive for the magical realism, it's not overdone. Really good.


Richard Massey (richardtheref) | 33 comments Starting up today.


Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 402 comments Today is the day that I "dive" in. (bad pun intended) --Jen from Quebec :0)


message 26: by Walter (last edited Jul 04, 2017 11:18AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Walter Spence (WalterSpence) | 970 comments Just getting started on this one. My initial introduction to Gaiman was through the Sandman comic series, in which he took a mid-card (at best) DC comics character and made him something special. (Actually met the gentleman around twenty years ago at World Fantasy Con.) Later my wife got me the entire series (done as a two volume collection), which I made my way through.

Next work of his I remember reading was the one the premium cable channel Starz has turned into a series, American Gods. Enjoyed that one. Just finished the one most folks think of when they think of Gaiman, outside of the Sandman comic, Neverwhere, which I'd been saving for when I needed something special to read.

Been a couple of months since HA has had a BotM I hadn't already read, so looking forward to it.


Kimberly Mintz | 8 comments Finished this last week. I liked the story, but the writing style was odd and prevented me from feeling enveloped in the pages, I forced myself to finish this book. It was quite boring at times, spending too much time trying to describe things in long, drawn out, yet choppy writing. Is it for a "young adult" audience? That's how it felt. And why didn't the author ever write "didn't" or "wouldn't" or "couldn't?" Everything was "could not, "did not," and "would not." Not, not, not.... I would NOT recommend this book and agree with the others above, wondering who it was recommended in a "horror" group?


Kimberly Mintz | 8 comments Why it was recommended not "who."


message 29: by Lena (new) - rated it 2 stars

Lena | 1408 comments I plague of reality eating birds on both their houses!


Maria Hill AKA MH Books (MariaHillDublin) | 50 comments Kimberly wrote: "Finished this last week. I liked the story, but the writing style was odd and prevented me from feeling enveloped in the pages, I forced myself to finish this book. It was quite boring at times, sp..."

Mmh I wouldn't agree with this. I find he has a particularly easy reading style. However, he is very very English and this may be the problem? Being Irish we have learned to understand our neighbours way of using English quite well.


Mixofsunandcloud | 605 comments It was recommended because the theme was Witches.


Maria Hill AKA MH Books (MariaHillDublin) | 50 comments It's certainly an interesting take on the witch genre - though I remember at one point they claim they are not witches.


message 33: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 1379 comments Well they would of course deny being witches...


David Brian (DavidBrian) | 1586 comments Maria wrote: "Kimberly wrote: "Finished this last week. I liked the story, but the writing style was odd and prevented me from feeling enveloped in the pages, I forced myself to finish this book. It was quite bo..."

I'm with Maria. I thoroughly enjoyed this story, and it definitely ignited memories of childhood.


David Brian (DavidBrian) | 1586 comments Maria wrote: "It's certainly an interesting take on the witch genre - though I remember at one point they claim they are not witches."

Given NG's interest in different god figures, and the various realities they occupy, I initially wondered if the Hempstocks were based around some mythological Mother Goddesses.

Having said this, I believe there was a witch in The Graveyard Book named (Liza?) Hempstock, and definitely another Hempstock appears in Stardust, so who knows for sure?

However, Lettie does say that 'Old Mrs Hempstock was around at the making of the universe', so I'd assume all these various Hempstocks share a family continuity.


Walter Spence (WalterSpence) | 970 comments Gaiman has a fondness for the Maiden, Mother, and Crone archtype. He referenced it in the Sandman comics with characters based on the three witches from the DC horror comics series, The Witching Hour.


Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 402 comments WALTER--- Are these Gaiman notions of the 'Maidan', 'Crone' and 'Mother' similar to those of the same names found in George R.R Martin 's 'A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE' series? (The 'Game of Thrones' series?) --Jen from Quebec :0)
(They were 3 of the 7 Gods found in his works...)


message 38: by Walter (last edited Jul 05, 2017 07:25PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Walter Spence (WalterSpence) | 970 comments Jennifer Lynn wrote: "WALTER--- Are these Gaiman notions of the 'Maidan', 'Crone' and 'Mother' similar to those of the same names found in George R.R Martin 's 'A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE' series? (The 'Ga..."

That would be my guess, Jennifer. In terms of origins, the Maiden/Mother/Crone archetype is popularly attributed to the author and mythographer Robert Graves, who popularized the concept in his books The White Goddess: A Historical Grammar of Poetic Myth, Amended and Enlarged Edition and The Greek Myths. In more recent times this 'trinity' (frequently referred to as 'The Triple Goddess') has been adopted by modern paganists as one of their deities.

So far as the Seven Gods of Game of Thrones is concerned, my guess would be that Martin incorporated this Triple diety concept into his Seven, with the male dieties representing typical male archetypes: the Father, the Warrior, the Smith, etc. But that's just speculation on my part; I have yet to read anything by Martin on the origins of his 'Seven'.


message 39: by Verthandi (last edited Jul 05, 2017 04:44PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Verthandi Wonka (vbwonka) | 5 comments Finished it yesterday! I liked it. It's very short and bittersweet. It's not going to make it to my favorites of all time, but I enjoyed it, and quite loved the ending.

Ursula was chill-inducing, so it definitely had some horror elements to it. And the three Hempstocks did remind me of an odd combination between the Moirai and the Norns.

For my first Gaiman book, I'm quite pleased. Very interesting indeed!


Kimberly (Kimberly_3238) | 4771 comments Mod
I just got mine in the mail today--a lot of mixed reviews on it, I've noticed...


Kimberly Mintz | 8 comments I think what I really didn't experience in this book, that I need in a good book, is the "I have to know what's going to happen next" feeling. I never closed my door at work to sneak a few more pages or stayed up until 3am because I couldn't put it down.

I bet it would make a fun, cloak and dagger type fantasy movie.

Verthandi mentioned Ursula being some of the "horror" element and I totally felt that, creepy for sure.


Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 402 comments Only about 20% into it, but it reads like a kid's fairy tale, or YA at best...not a complaint, just a surprise. --Jen from Quebec :0)


message 43: by Matt (new) - rated it 4 stars

Matt | 22 comments I'm about 100 pages in and am really enjoying it so far. I agree with others that the writing style is a bit choppy but I am thinking that may done purposefully to illustrate the narrator's mindset? He seems to just accept things and move on which may be why he is so easily drawn into the Hempstock's world?

Obviously this is more fantasy than horror but (view spoiler) is definitely creepy.


Amanda B  (azobac) | 6 comments Just finished it. This is the third book I've read from this author and as usual it doesn't disappoint. The first one I read was American Gods which is definitely an adult read and the second was the Graveyard Book which is for kids. This book I think is squarely in the middle where the story is (view spoiler) Very fun and surprising read.


Richard Massey (richardtheref) | 33 comments Really enjoyed this. Does come across a bit like a YA book but his is not a bad thing. Liked the Graveyard Book & Neverwhere but never really got American Gods. Loved the characters. Also, he gives a hint that there may be a follow up which is really exciting.


message 46: by De (new) - rated it 4 stars

De James I enjoyed this book, but it seemed more like a short story than a full novel. Neil Gaiman's always a good read.


Kimberly (Kimberly_3238) | 4771 comments Mod
Just starting, but I love his prose and the direction the book is taking, already.


Maria Hill AKA MH Books (MariaHillDublin) | 50 comments De wrote: "I enjoyed this book, but it seemed more like a short story than a full novel. Neil Gaiman's always a good read."

I was glad it was short as I am reading two long novels at the moment. The Crow Girl The Crow Girl by Erik Axl Sund at >750 pages and 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami1Q84 at > 1,000. So as a short novel was just what I needed.


message 49: by De (new) - rated it 4 stars

De James Maria wrote: "I was glad it was short as I am reading two long novels at the moment. [..."

My favorite part of Goodreads is seeing what others are reading, like following breadcrumbs in the forest, you never know where they'll lead... I'm afraid those two books are too much for me, though. Think maybe I'll read "The Library at Mount Char", from last month's list. Good luck, Maria.


message 50: by Lena (new) - rated it 2 stars

Lena | 1408 comments That's a good choice.


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