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All You Need Is Kill
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Monthly Read: Themed > All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka

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message 1: by mark, personal space invader (new)

mark monday (majestic-plural) | 1275 comments Mod
Hello everyone and welcome to June's Themed Read. The theme chosen is Military Science Fiction. If you'd like to read more about this sub-genre or would like additional recommendations, check out the topics in this folder:

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/group...

All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka was chosen. The book was published in 2004 and is considered a "light novel" i.e. a Japanese novel targeting teen readers.

The novel was serialized as a manga by writer Ryōsuke Takeuchi and artist Takeshi Obata in the pages of Shonen Jump (where many of my own favorite manga and anime have been serialized). The novel was adapted into a film by director Doug Liman and re-titled "Edge of Tomorrow".

To my knowledge, this is the first "light novel" chosen by the readers of this group.


Scott I wouldn't consider it a light novel nor directed at teens.


MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 39 comments Scott wrote: "I wouldn't consider it a light novel nor directed at teens."

Agreed. I found it rather grim, all things considered. And WHERE did they come up with that character for Cruise?


message 4: by mark, personal space invader (new)

mark monday (majestic-plural) | 1275 comments Mod
Scott wrote: "I wouldn't consider it a light novel nor directed at teens."

I'm not trying to be a dick here, but my post was really not about what you or I personally consider! All You Need Is Kill has been branded and marketed as a "light novel" (at least per Wikipedia and the various anime & manga websites where I've seen it mentioned and discussed) and light novels are usually targeted towards teens. This is about definitions, not opinions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_n...


MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 39 comments Maybe they mean light in the sense of where it originated and/or in Japan (since it is a translation).

But in America, I think, it would get a lot of flak for the grimness and violence. But maybe not. There's no sex.


message 6: by mark, personal space invader (new)

mark monday (majestic-plural) | 1275 comments Mod
Ah, maybe the confusion is in the terminology itself! I didn't think of that.

Yeah, I'm not sure where the "light" comes from in "light novels".

Talking about Japanese genres can often be frustrating (at least for me). I remember getting into arguments over the very dark, grim, violent Death Note when I said that it was targeted towards teens. This wasn't my opinion because Death Note was literally serialized in a "shounen" magazine... a genre of magazine which is targeted towards teen males. Despite the fact that the subject matter itself was pretty adult in theme.


message 7: by MrsJoseph *grouchy* (last edited Jun 05, 2017 02:03PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 39 comments mark wrote: "Ah, maybe the confusion is in the terminology itself! I didn't think of that.

Yeah, I'm not sure where the "light" comes from in "light novels".

Talking about Japanese genres can often be frustra..."


Sometimes its difficult for me to remember that other cultures have different degrees of adulthood than the US. One of my favorite YAs is Starship Troopers which is a teen focused novel but I don't think it would get written as is today. But Heinlein got a lot of flack for it back in the day, which is surprising since there's no sex...

ETA: My cousin is really into Japanese language, culture, etc. She says they are much more adult than here. I am personally unsure.


message 8: by Haaze (new)

Haaze | 29 comments Interesting with the combination of book, manga and movie. It seems like the manga is preferred by many reviewers (as far as I can tell), but I guess it really depends on which medium one prefers. I had no idea that the movie was based on a novel. Thanks for bringing it forward in the group!


MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 39 comments Haaze wrote: "Interesting with the combination of book, manga and movie. It seems like the manga is preferred by many reviewers (as far as I can tell), but I guess it really depends on which medium one prefers. ..."


I have to admit that while I enjoy the movie for what it is...it is nothing at all like the movie. Though, in some instances, I think the movie is better.


(don't shoot me!)


message 10: by mark, personal space invader (new)

mark monday (majestic-plural) | 1275 comments Mod
yeah, I really enjoyed the movie. lots of fun! I do hope to read this eventually but I'm still on the fence about when and how because my preference leans towards reading the manga rather than the novel. I'm hoping that people will weigh in about the novel and that that will help me make a decision on which medium.


Scott From what I understand, a "light novel" is one that is designed to be easy and quick to read, so that people can take them on their daily commutes. While this isn't a long novel, it didn't strike me as being simplified in such a way, either.

I enjoyed the film, which I read after the book. It's interesting that they changed the scientific explanation for the phenomenon; maybe they thought audiences wouldn't understand the one in the novel?


message 12: by mark, personal space invader (last edited Jun 05, 2017 03:07PM) (new)

mark monday (majestic-plural) | 1275 comments Mod
that's interesting re. the intention of what a light novel should be. commuter novels! although per Wikipedia (not always the best source, I know), they are roughly the same size as American novels.

I thought this was interesting (also from Wiki):

Light novels are an evolution of pulp magazines. To please their audience, in the 1970s, most of the Japanese pulp magazines, which had already changed from the classic style to the popular anime style covers, began to put illustrations in the beginning of each story and included articles about popular anime, movies, and video games. The narrative evolved to please the new generations and became fully illustrated with the popular style. The popular serials are printed in novels.


also, you now have me a bit more interested in the book, if only to see the change in explanation.


Scott I won't give it away, but I think it's a lot more interesting than the sort-of-magical one in the film.


MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 39 comments mark wrote: "yeah, I really enjoyed the movie. lots of fun! I do hope to read this eventually but I'm still on the fence about when and how because my preference leans towards reading the manga rather than the ..."

I watched the movie first, then I read the audio. I switched to the paperback because I could feel the weight of the ending hanging over my head.

I'm not sure of your preferences but the audio was nice. The narrator sounded nice and I was able to sink into the story easily.

There is some great imagery so if you're a note-taker, the DTB might be of more interest.

I LOVED the movie - its a classic Tom Crusie with all the explosions, etc - but the MC (Tommy boy) was created just for the movie. The whole intro with Tom and getting busted down to rank and file is not in the book. The MC of the book IS rank and file and starts that way. He's a easier character to like, in my opinion.


message 15: by Bob (new)

Bob Lee (boblee333) | 36 comments I didn't know the movie was based on the book, so I'm glad this was chosen for the month's read. I read the Manga version. For some reason, the depiction of the Mimics made me think of the Langoliers.

It was also interesting to see what lines got picked up in the movie (ex. "Do I have something on my face?")


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