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Around the World in Eighty Days
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Archive Sci-fi/Fantasy Reads > 2017 June TRAVEL: Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

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message 1: by Lesle, Main Moderator/Admin (last edited May 29, 2017 03:32PM) (new)

Lesle | 7567 comments Mod
(French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, published in 1873. In the story, Phileas Fogg of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a £20,000 wager set by his friends at the Reform Club. It is one of Verne's most acclaimed works.

Our host will be Trisha.

The Theme is 'Travel' you may read the book suggested by the host or read and discuss your choice of TRAVEL Classic.


Trisha | 1176 comments Welcome to the new theme of "Travel". As Lesle says, my chosen book is Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne. I've been fascinated by the idea of this book ever since seeing a television travel series where Michael Palin tried to replicate the journey.

I hope some group members will read this book with me. But the choice of book is optional, so if you plan to read something else please share your ideas here. Hopefully some people may have time to read more than one travel themed book during the month.


message 3: by Lesle, Main Moderator/Admin (new)

Lesle | 7567 comments Mod
I'm in!

Just need to finish the Buddy Read with Tony for The Adolescent.

Trisha did you pick a Kindle edition?


Ying Ying (yingyingshi) | 38 comments I read this book last year and found it very adventurous. However, as it was one of my first experiences with classics, I was not sure what to expect. I thought I would have some take-aways for life, but instead ended up just enjoying it.

Trisha, did you have any take-aways from this book?


message 5: by Rafael, Moderator II from Brazil and Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 581 comments Mod
I will join too. if it was not choose for now I would choose it for the december read.


message 6: by Ana (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ana | 90 comments Jules Verne is one of my favourites! I've read this book many years ago and I enjoyed it a lot! He's very creative, there's action and adventure and his narratives. My opinion, at least. Happy readings, everyone! ;)


message 7: by Lesle, Main Moderator/Admin (new)

Lesle | 7567 comments Mod
Thanks Ana! Your more than welcome to stop in as we progress!

This will be my first time reading it! So a bit excited!


Trisha | 1176 comments Yes, I got the (free) Kindle edition, Lesle.

Ying Ying, I've been waiting to read this with the group so haven't formed a strong opinion of it yet.

It will be good to share the book with everyone here.


message 9: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
I plan on reading it too. I got a free ebook version for my ipad(in French).


message 10: by Ana (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ana | 90 comments Thanks Lesle, I will ;)


message 11: by Lesle, Main Moderator/Admin (new)

Lesle | 7567 comments Mod
Nice Rosemarie!
I will have to look today for an edition.


Trisha | 1176 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I plan on reading it too. I got a free ebook version for my ipad(in French)."

Fortunately for everyone, I got the English version - otherwise I wouldn't be able to join in the discussions! But I'm pleased you will read the French version, Rosemarie, as it will be interesting to know how you feel about the way the book was written originally.


message 13: by Trisha (last edited May 31, 2017 08:03AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Trisha | 1176 comments Although we start officially tomorrow, I thought I should make a start to avoid keeping people waiting. But no spoilers!

First impressions:

The chapter titles are amazing, they almost tell the story. I haven't seen such long descriptions before.

I like the first part, set in London. The area now is less residential than in the book, though various clubs remain & it's very expensive. Initial descriptions of the people are detailed enough to form a good basis for the story. I'm really enjoying the book already.

Just for interest, I found on Wikipedia that the £20000 at that time would be approximately worth £2 million pounds in modern money!


message 14: by Blueberry (new) - added it

Blueberry (blueberry1) | 895 comments Trisha, I enjoyed the Michael Palin shows also and his sense of humor in his travels. Around the World in 80 Days made a great unit study when I read it with my homeschooling children.


message 15: by Lesle, Main Moderator/Admin (new)

Lesle | 7567 comments Mod
Trisha wrote: "Just for interest, I found on Wikipedia that the £20000 at that time would be approximately worth £2 million pounds in modern money!..."

Can you believe such a wager!


message 16: by Trisha (last edited May 31, 2017 01:07PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Trisha | 1176 comments Blueberry wrote: "Trisha, I enjoyed the Michael Palin shows also and his sense of humor in his travels. Around the World in 80 Days made a great unit study when I read it with my homeschooling children."

I'm glad you watched them too.

Lesle wrote: "Can you believe such a wager!"

No, Lesle - I can't even imagine having that amount of money!


message 17: by Mimi (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mimi (heymimi) | 87 comments Great book choice, Trisha!

I'm only a couple of pages in, and already had a good couple of chuckles. (Fogg takes a Bradshaw with him? After seeing the Michael Portillo programs on the bbc, that's rather funny.)

Can't believe I never got around to reading this before, since I've seen pretty much all the movies (my favourite still being the 1989 miniseries with Pierce Brosnan, Eric Idle and Peter Ustinov. It's a real cameo-fest.).


message 18: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
I have read the first three chapters and am hooked.


Trisha | 1176 comments Mimi - I'm glad you spotted the reference to Bradshaw! I just love the way Michael Portillo travels everywhere apparently taking only the book with him (I wonder how many BBC workers are just off-camera, absolutely laden with luggage!)

Rosemarie, I'm pleased you're hooked too.

I find the book very funny, & dated but in a nice way. I'm amused by Fogg being disinterested in his travels & just keeping to his own routine instead of trying to do any sightseeing.


message 20: by Rafael, Moderator II from Brazil and Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 581 comments Mod
I reached 1/3 of the book. I slowed my pace or I would finish it early.

Good to reread it because I did not remember a lot of things.

Fogg it's a real person or he carries the stereotypical english way of being, for french, at least?


Trisha | 1176 comments Rafael wrote: "I reached 1/3 of the book. I slowed my pace or I would finish it early.

Good to reread it because I did not remember a lot of things.

Fogg it's a real person or he carries the stereotypical engli..."


Yes, Rafael. I had to slow down too. Fogg seems to be a stereotype to me too. There's a gentle mockery of English arrogance towards other nationalities - yes, I can say that as I'm mostly English! I guess some English people may have been offended, but because it's old-fashioned it just makes me laugh. His lack of interest in the places & people seems a bit like tourists who go abroad for holidays now & never venture beyond the area around the hotel pool.


message 22: by Rafael, Moderator II from Brazil and Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 581 comments Mod
Trisha wrote: "His lack of interest in the places & people seems a bit like tourists who go abroad for holidays now & never venture beyond the area around the hotel pool. "

I agree with you.


message 23: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
I noticed that Fogg spent his days playing whist while Passepartout enjoyed himself sight seeing.
I was on a river cruise of the Danube River 11 years ago. There was a group of people who spent the entire time playing bridge. Things have not changed all that much.


message 24: by Trisha (last edited Jun 04, 2017 11:31AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Trisha | 1176 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I noticed that Fogg spent his days playing whist while Passepartout enjoyed himself sight seeing.
I was on a river cruise of the Danube River 11 years ago. There was a group of people who spent the..."


Yes, Rosemarie. I'm getting the impression that Fogg has only an academic interest in planning the trip to win his bet. In contrast, though he was reluctant to travel initially, Passepartout is having a great time & using every opportunity for new experiences.

I envy you your river cruise - I'd have been right there for the sightseeing with you, can't imagine missing it all just to play cards!


message 25: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
In India, Phileas Fogg becomes interested in something other than the race, and it is about time. We have also met Detective Fix, who is convinced that Fogg is a notorious bank robber. Passepartout has resigned himself to the fact that Fogg really plans on going around the world in 80 days.


Trisha | 1176 comments What do others think about the story involving the elephant? I was impressed & thought Fogg was very generous towards various people. (Trying not to give spoilers here!)


message 27: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
I agree, Trish. It was a nice touch(what he did with the elephant when he was through with it).


message 28: by Mimi (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mimi (heymimi) | 87 comments I'll play advocates devil here...

I don't think Fogg did what he did regarding the elephant because it was the nice or generous thing to do, it was just the quickest way to resolve the problem that the elephant represented.

(This does not mean I think Fogg is a bad person. He's just quintescentially propper and correct).


Trisha | 1176 comments Mimi wrote: "I'll play advocates devil here...

I don't think Fogg did what he did regarding the elephant because it was the nice or generous thing to do, it was just the quickest way to resolve the problem tha..."


You may be correct! But having spent so much money to get it initially, he might have tried to get at least some money back.

I had the impression at various points in the book that he didn't care about money at all, even the bet was more about a challenge than winning or losing money. I couldn't decide whether he was too proud to risk losing a bet or whether it was all about an intellectual challenge in planning his travels.


message 30: by Lesle, Main Moderator/Admin (new)

Lesle | 7567 comments Mod
Trisha, Im hoping to join in, but unfortunately it will be later in the month. This Buddy Read is a little heftier than I had anticipated! (Blame that on Tony! haha!)

Sorry, I have a hard time reading 1 book at a time, let alone 2!
Please forgive me!


Brian Reynolds | 4443 comments Trisha wrote: "Although we start officially tomorrow, I thought I should make a start to avoid keeping people waiting. But no spoilers!

First impressions:

The chapter titles are amazing, they almost tell the st..."


I just started and my first thought was "this is one of those classic novels where the chapter headings are not just a number, or a title, but instead a description of exactly what happens in the chapter, often starting with the words 'in which.'"
Some authors like Dickens and Trollope often used shorter descriptions for chapter titles like "Liking Life on My Own Account No Better, I Form a Great Resolution" from David Copperfield and "John Eames Encounters Two Adventures and Displays Great Courage in Both" from The Small House at Allington.
However, this novel uses even more detailed descriptions that I first remember encountering 40 years ago when I read Fielding's 18th century's work The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling.
While I would think the detailed descriptions should take away a little of the suspense of the novel, I can't say I've ever felt that way when reading a novel with such descriptive chapter titles.


Brian Reynolds | 4443 comments I just realized that if the JEOPARDY question was "Who is the main character in Around the World in 80 Days" I would have confidently buzzed in and said "Phineas Fogg" and then been surprised when told I was wrong.
While I'd like to say this name misremembering is due to my fondness for Trollope's Phineas Finn, I think it predates my knowledge of Trollope's work.
It took me 50 pages to realize my error.


Trisha | 1176 comments Lesle wrote: "Trisha, Im hoping to join in, but unfortunately it will be later in the month. This Buddy Read is a little heftier than I had anticipated! (Blame that on Tony! haha!)

Sorry, I have a hard time rea..."


Don't worry, Lesle - I'll enjoy seeing your views on this book when you have time. No hurry!


Trisha | 1176 comments Brian, I like your comments! I was surprised by the titles as it was a style I hadn't noticed in other books. Your opinion about the characters is fascinating- I hadn't thought of them that way, I was just enjoying the story as I didn't know all the details before.


message 35: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
I don't mind descriptive chapter titles at all. The author usually has a few surprises for the reader anyway.


message 36: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
I think the most interesting character is PassePartout. He certainly has the most fun sight-seeing.


message 37: by Mimi (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mimi (heymimi) | 87 comments I just reached my favourite part of the story: Captain Speedy and the Henrietta (chapter 32 and on).


Trisha | 1176 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I think the most interesting character is PassePartout. He certainly has the most fun sight-seeing."

I agree, Rosemarie. He seems enthusiastic for new experiences. He's confident & happy to talk with all sorts of people.


message 39: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
This book was a lot of fun to read, and I thought the ending was perfect. Phileas
Fogg showed his human side.
Of course, my favourite character was PassePartout.


message 40: by Mimi (last edited Jun 12, 2017 12:17PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mimi (heymimi) | 87 comments I, too, greatly enjoyed Around the World in Eighty Days.
Made the mistake however, to squeeze in an extra book in the travel theme (and from the same author): A Voyage in a Balloon. Good thing it's less than 50 pages.
Didn't like that one at all. I'd suggest reading any other book in the 'Fantastic Voyages' series...


Brian Reynolds | 4443 comments SPOILERS?

It doesn't seem fair that Fogg seems to get as much credit as Passepartout for the Aouda 'incident' when Passepartout was the true hero. I know the General gets the credit when the soldiers put their lives on the line, but, unless I missed something, Fogg didn't plan what Passepartout did.
Interesting to see the drugging with opium as opium use is a plot device similarly used in sensation novels of this time period.


message 42: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
Passepartout is certainly resourceful, brave and bold.


message 43: by Blueberry (new) - added it

Blueberry (blueberry1) | 895 comments I'm enjoying reading all your comments on this book and half wishing I had read it with you. Who knows...it's not to late to start. I have read it before about 10 years ago while homeschooling my kids.


message 44: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
It is quite a fast read compared to 20 O00Leagues under the sea.


message 45: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
The money was lying on a cashier's table unattended and some one just picked it up and walked out.


message 46: by Trisha (last edited Jun 13, 2017 03:20PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Trisha | 1176 comments SpaceReader wrote: "Hi all, can someone please explain how the bank robber stole the money from The Bank of England? It's on Chapter 3. I got lost with the gold ingot being passed around.

[EDIT]
I don't really unders..."


The story of the gold ingot was used to show that people were usually trustworthy - they passed the gold around to look at it, but it was returned safely. So theft was unusual. The money that was stolen was just a package lying on a desk, unsupervised while someone served a customer. Next time they looked, the package had gone missing.

But how it happened doesn't really matter. Spoiler alert! Later in the book, Fogg's behaviour means he becomes a suspect for the theft, & this affects what happens next.


Trisha | 1176 comments SpaceReader wrote: "Wow, thank you so much!

I think the English translation I have picked up is quite archaic for me."


No problem! The (free) Kindle version I read was ok. I was happy though as the story started in London so it was easy for me to visualise & I got used to the style before the story moved to unfamiliar places.


Trisha | 1176 comments Rosemarie wrote: "The money was lying on a cashier's table unattended and some one just picked it up and walked out."

Sorry, Rosemarie - this reply wasn't showing on my screen when I replied to the question last night, I've only seen it today.


message 49: by Rosemarie, Moderator III/ from Canada / YA Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 11296 comments Mod
Trisha, that happens when you post at the same time as another person. I guess Great minds think alike (grin).


message 50: by Samuel (last edited Jun 15, 2017 12:48PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Samuel Parker Hello, I just joined the group and will have to pull this one off the shelf. Its been awhile since I read it, but always loved the closing lines of the novel


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