What's the Name of That Book??? discussion

Fire in the Heart
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SOLVED: Children's/YA > SOLVED. MG/YA Realistic Fiction with Young Girl Finding a Mysterious Daguerreotype (Published prior to 1993) [s]

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message 1: by Chrissie (last edited Jun 02, 2018 03:42PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments I'm trying to think of this children's book I read in middle school, so sometime between 1990-1993. Probably a classic bildungsroman with a twist of a mystery. This would've been a "chapter book" more along the lines of Up a Road Slowly, and possibly set in the Midwest. I have always felt it was a Midwest/Plains state, and my feeling is that it was set sometime prior to WWII—maybe the '30s? Though I could see it being more of a setting in the Northeast, too. Almost definitely the United States, though I could see it be a surprise Canada.

I feel that it was a standalone book. I'm truly unsure about the cover. I want to say maybe there was a house on the cover in the distance, or something, but I honestly am not certain. There are no illustrations in this book that I can recall. This is for a *slightly* older audience.

The gist of the plot, or some portion of it, as I remember it is about the main character, a young girl between the ages of 11 or 12... broader, at most, would be 10-13. She's not an orphan as far as I know. I don't recall her having siblings, but I'm not sure enough about that one. I don't recall her parents either, but I don't feel that she was totally without one or both.

This girl visits a man who lives in a cabin—not a log-cabin—at various times throughout the story. He lives nearbyish and as she is exploring the area over this time period, she heads to his cabin. He definitely lives alone, and the place is sparsely decorated. This is not their first meeting, either. They know each other—either through being related or nearly so. She doesn't stay with the person she visits—she has her own home.

While in the cabin, during an early visit, she finds or is given a jewelry-box type container and inside is a daguerreotype. The box containing the daguerreotype is on a bookshelf, perhaps built-in, and is of someone she knows or to whom she is related—like a grandmother. I don't think she quite had permission to take it down and look in the box, but the man was only a little agitated when he catches her with it. I seem to remember the person in the daguerreotype was a woman (possibly related to the MC, but I'm pretty sure related to the man in the cabin), and for some reason (I hesitate even to say this) I think she was a horsewoman in a circus-type show. I feel like he loved this woman, and not necessarily that they were married.

My memory is ludicrously sketchy on this, but I think there's a boy featured as her friend. The boy would've been the same age. I feel like there is a scene (possibly the ending) where the MC is waiting in a tree or by a tree on the road to school, and this male friend of hers walks by and she feels better about this whole "growing up" thing....

Pretty sure it takes place right when school starts back, and maybe she writes a paper about the information or person related to the daguerreotype. I'm not sure of that either, but I am sure that she and her male friend investigate more about the guy in the cabin or the person in the picture. She does some research of some kind and learns more about them and, presumably, discovers the identity of the featured person in the tintype.

If I remember correctly, the book might've been an older one, and the spelling of 'daguerreotype' was a little off from what I had in my dictionary/encyclopedia. Maybe 'daguerretype'—being more on par with simply Louis Daguerre's last name.

I remember in my AG Reading class we had to choose a previously unknown vocabulary word from our weekly reading and bring it in and define it for the class. I distinctly remember being excited about this word (which is why I feel the alternate amalgamation of Daguerre's name with the -type suffix was used in this book (or in my dictionary)), and bringing it in.

I cannot be sure, since I can't actually remember this book, but I feel that those terms, Daguerreotype and tintype, were used interchangeably (however incorrect that makes it). I assume it was less about describing or defining the process, and just using handy, broad terms.

I am certain of the daguerreotype being featured prominently in the story, because that's the first I'd heard of them and remember reading more about them myself in my World Book Encyclopedia (ah, remember those days). In looking for this book, I cannot seem to get away from books that are either nonfiction books specifically about daguerreotypes or the history of photography, or fictional books that are looking to teach through a story about this early form of photography. Which is further underscored by the fact that that is the exact word that sticks in my head about the book, and the point of the plot of which I am certain. The daguerreotype itself isn't the main focus of the story, only the catalyst that sets this into motion.

(I think the recollection of that word might be my downfall.)

I think there's something to do with Native Americans - and a tree that signifies something of importance. I hesitate so much to say this, because like the keyword "daguerreotype," this one sets you on a specific and limiting search course, but ... I feel as if the title was structured like an indication of a passing of time by the way some Native Americans marked time/distance to travel—as in "moons" or the like. But I have never been sure if that memory was associated with *this* book or another I read around the same time.

In that vein, I have tried both Two Moons in August and Walk Two Moons with no success—though the setting/time period for both was way off of what I remembered.

I have also checked out WorldCat, as well as put something similar to this posting on AbeBooks.com BookSleuth® Discussions.

I feel like my only hope at this point is to rely on someone else's own memory.

This book is not:
Up a Road Slowly
The Silver Coach
The Keepsake Chest
Return to Gone-Away
Two Moons in August
Walk Two Moons
Peachtree Island
The Long White Month
Kate and the Family Tree
West Against The Wind
Hitty, Her First Hundred Years
Edward's Portrait


message 2: by Kris (new)

Kris | 32271 comments Mod
Here's the only children's book on daguerreotypes that I've seen so far - Edward's Portrait by Barbara Morrow

www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/ba... (There's a cover image.) - "An itinerant daguerreotypist is coming to town, and Pa is taking the family, including young Edward and the baby, to have their portraits made. Morrow contrives to include a lot about this early form of photography while telling a lively story; she cleverly broadens the context by having the photographer talk about his travel adventures as he tries to keep Edward still. Nicely composed soft-pencil and watercolor illustrations add humor and interesting detail. A spirited bit of social history. (Picture book. 4-8)"


message 3: by Chrissie (last edited May 27, 2017 11:22AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Kris wrote: "Here's the only children's book on daguerreotypes that I've seen so far -

No, but thank you for the effort. This would've been a "chapter book" more along the lines of Up a Road Slowly, possibly set in the Midwest.

In looking for this book, I cannot seem to get away from books that are either nonfiction books specifically about daguerreotypes or the history of photography, or fictional books that are looking to teach through a story about this early form of photography. Which is further underscored by the fact that that is the exact word that sticks in my head about the book, and the point of the plot of which I am certain. The daguerreotype itself isn't the main focus of the story, only the catalyst that sets this into motion.

If I remember correctly, the book might've been an older one, or the setting was older (1930's?), and the spelling of 'daguerreotype' was a little off from what I had in my dictionary/encyclopedia. Maybe 'daguerretype'—being more on par with simply Louis Daguerre's last name.

Thanks for looking!


message 4: by Abigail (new)

Abigail (handmaiden) | 390 comments This is a long shot, but in Hitty, Her First Hundred Years, by Rachel Field, there is an episode where the little girl who owns the doll Hitty, at the time, has her daguerreotype taken, and Hitty ends up having her very own daguerreotype done as well. Doesn't fit much else of what you recollect, though.

P.S. Have you tried the advanced search option at WorldCat? You can set results to only return fiction, etc. http://www.worldcat.org/advancedsearch


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Abigail wrote: "This is a long shot, but in Hitty, Her First Hundred Years, by Rachel Field, there is an episode where the little girl who owns the doll Hitty, at the time, has her daguerreotype taken..."

No, that's not it either. I have also looked at that during my searches. And, yes, I have also checked out WorldCat, as well as put something similar to this posting on AbeBooks.com BookSleuth® Discussions.

I feel like my only hope at this point is to rely on someone else's own memory.

Thanks for helping, though!


message 6: by Kris (last edited May 30, 2017 01:19PM) (new)

Kris | 32271 comments Mod
Daguerreotype (Daguerretype) = a photograph taken by an early photographic process employing an iodine-sensitized silvered plate and mercury vapor

Tintype = a photograph taken as a positive on a thin tin plate


message 7: by Chrissie (last edited Sep 28, 2017 10:03AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Kris wrote: "Daguerreotype (Daguerretype) = a photograph taken by an early photographic process employing an iodine-sensitized silvered plate and mercury vapor

Tintype = a photograph taken as a positive on a t..."


I don't know how I missed this reply, but yes, Kris. Thank you for that update in case someone had a question. I never know if I should inform or just ask my question.

(Side note: I remember in my AG Reading class we had to choose a previously unknown vocabulary word from our weekly reading and bring it in and define it for the class. I distinctly remember being excited about this word (which is why I feel the alternate amalgamation of Daguerre's name with the -type suffix was used in this book (or in my dictionary)), and bringing it in. Sometimes it was hard to land on a previously unknown word while reading age-appropriate material. Incidentally, the only other vocabulary word I remember bringing in was "chagrin" in Bette Davis's This 'n That, and I actually didn't read it, I just skimmed until I landed on an acceptable word.)

Anyway, I digress something fierce.

I cannot be sure, since I can't actually remember this book, but I feel that those terms, Daguerreotype and tintype, were used interchangeably (however incorrect that makes it). I assume it was less about describing or defining the process, and just using handy, broad terms.

Oh, and...bump.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments I have hesitated to add, but I think the "older person" who is in possession of said image, lives in a cabin of some sorts.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Nudge.


message 10: by Tab (new)

Tab (tabbrown) | 4844 comments Was this part of a series?
Anything about the cover?
Location story takes place?


message 11: by Chrissie (last edited Dec 08, 2017 01:16PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Tab wrote: "Was this part of a series?
Anything about the cover?
Location story takes place?"


Well, as I have said my memory on this is sketchy to the point of being nonsensical, but...

I feel that it was a standalone book.

I'm truly unsure about the cover. I want to say maybe there was a house on the cover in the distance, or something, but I honestly am not certain.

The location is a big hole as well, but I have always felt it was a Midwest/Plains state, and my feeling is that it was set sometime prior to WWII—maybe the '30s?

I feel like there is a scene (possibly the ending) where the MC is waiting in a tree or by a tree on the road to school, and this male friend of hers walks by and she feels better about this whole "growing up" thing....

Pretty sure it takes place right when school starts back, and maybe she writes a paper about the information or person related to the daguerreotype. I'm not sure of that either, but I am sure that she and her male friend investigate more about the guy in the cabin or the person in the picture.

Also, I seem to remember the person in the daguerreotype was a woman (possibly related to the MC, but I'm pretty sure related to the man in the cabin), and for some reason (I hesitate even to say this) I think she was a horsewoman in a circus-type show.

Probably a classic bildungsroman with a twist of a mystery.

By the way, I really appreciate anyone who has tried to find this one. This is that one book from my reading history that bugs me to death.


message 12: by Andria (new)

Andria (airdna) | 2500 comments Mod
A Google book search turns up this: West Against The Wind as containing the word daguerreotype, set in the west, with coming of age themes....

from Kirkus review: "A sturdy tale of a 14-year-old tomboy facing the realities of growing up, complicated by her being part of the westward trek to California in the 1850's. Abigail Parker, her mother, and her brother have joined a small wagon train to attempt to find her father, a victim of gold fever from whom they have not heard since he left their midwest home a year ago. With them is her father's brother, a taciturn man; his refined new wife; and the mysterious Matthew, who asks to accompany them for reasons he keeps to himself. As they travel from Independence to Yuba City, Abby must deal with her emergence as a woman, with all the changes and limitations that that threatens. Among the changes is a growing feeling of attraction to Matthew, in part inspired by empathy when he confides his plight: he is searching for his runaway sister and fears what he will find. As the journey continues, the hardships increase until the party's arrival in California in a state of near starvation, complicated by tragedies that have touched them all and given Abby a more realistic outlook."


message 14: by Chrissie (last edited Dec 13, 2017 03:31PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments West Against The Wind doesn't look like the one. As far as I can remember this is not a "road trip" book ("wagon trip" as it were), but thank you, Andria!

I'm not 100% a "no" on Kate and the Family Tree, and it's so obscure that it is difficult to look into. I think I'll have to buy a used copy and take a peek at it, and then see where we go from there. I'll report back in. Thanks, Rainbowheart!


message 15: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Been a *long* time since I read it, but Kate goes to stay with her uncle. He's an old man who is either widowed or never married, can't remember which. She meets a boy who lives in the house next door or down the street. Together I think they find a box that contains a bunch of letters and pictures (daguerrerotypes?) and there was something about initials of people in the family being carved on the trees around the property and maybe a lost or stolen key. Does that help at all?


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments That does sound like it lines up with my vague memories of this unknown book. It really does sound familiar. I hesitate to be too excited; I’m really intrigued now. I’ve ordered a used copy and hopefully will get to read it soon!


message 17: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Fingers crossed! Let us know. :)


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rainbowheart wrote: "Fingers crossed! Let us know. :)"

While The Family Tree isn't my long-searched for book, it was still a lovely read. The entire narrative is so similar in many ways, but the book I'm trying to find wasn't so formal (setting and dialogue), nor was the main character abandoned, so to speak. This was a sweet little story similar to Pollyanna in that regard. And, not one mention of that damned word, in any variation: daguerreotype. (I think the recollection of that word might be my downfall.)

Regardless, thanks so much, Rainbowheart.


message 19: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Aw, too bad, I was hoping that would be it. No worries though, we'll keep looking!


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Sigh. Bump.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Consider this bumped.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Meekly bumping.


message 23: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Still looking, but gosh, it's hard to know how best to narrow it down.

How old was the girl in the story, roughly? Can you remember anything else about this older person she went to stay with? Male or female? How much older? Was the girl staying with the person just temporarily for a vacation or because she had been orphaned? Was the girl on her own, no siblings with her at all?

Random guesses....

Peachtree Island
The Long White Month


message 24: by Chrissie (last edited May 31, 2018 09:15AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rainbowheart wrote: "Still looking, but gosh, it's hard to know how best to narrow it down.

I know, I know. Thanks for any help.

Neither Peachtree Island nor The Long White Month are it. I liked the look of the Mildred Lawrence one, but her books (from what I can tell) are aimed at either a younger audience, like Peachtree, or at older audiences with high school or college age girls in them.

------

Let's see. The girl was around 11 or 12... broader, at most, would be 10-13. The boy would've been the same age.

There are no illustrations in this book that I can recall. This is for a *slightly* older audience.

I didn't realize I had left off so much detail (of what I can recall), but she's not an orphan as far as I know. And, I clearly misdirected it all by not mentioning that she doesn't go to live with the man (he's a he) in the cabin, she literally visits him at various times throughout the story. He lives nearbyish and as she is exploring the area over this time period, she heads to his cabin—cabin, but not a log-cabin. He definitely lives alone, and the place is sparsely decorated. This is not their first meeting, either. They know each other—either through being related or nearly so.

The box containing the daguerreotype is on a bookshelf, perhaps built-in, and is of someone she knows or to whom she is related—like a grandmother. I don't think she quite had permission to take it down and look in the box, but the man was only a little agitated when he catches her with it. I feel like he loved this woman, and not necessarily that they were married.

I don't recall her having siblings, but I'm not sure enough about that one. I don't recall her parents either, but I don't feel that she was totally without one or both.


message 25: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Thanks, that's good info!

I was picturing her going to live with the older person, so this opens up the field a little bit.

More random guesses....

The Silver Coach
The Keepsake Chest
Return to Gone-Away


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rainbowheart wrote: "Thanks, that's good info!

Of course! I'm glad I finally caught that I hadn't given enough yet...

I hesitate so much to say this, because like the keyword "daguerreotype," this one sets you on a specific and limiting search course, but ... I feel as if the title was structured like an indication of a passing of time by the way some Native Americans marked time/distance to travel—as in "moons" or the like. But I have never been sure if that memory was associated with *this* book or another I read around the same time.

In that vein, I have tried both Two Moons in August and Walk Two Moons with no success—though the setting/time period for both was way off of what I remembered.

No, to those random guesses, too. Thanks!


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments I have updated my original post to include both what I remember so far of the book and the books mentioned we can dismiss.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Bump.


message 29: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Bump for Chrissie.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rainbowheart wrote: "Bump for Chrissie."

(Chrissie fist bumps Rainbowheart for the unsolicited, but much appreciated, thread bump.)


message 31: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Another bump for Chrissie.

Hope we can track this one down!


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Help me, Obi Wan Kenobi. You're my only hope.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Bump.


message 34: by Rosa (last edited Mar 01, 2019 05:59PM) (new)


message 35: by Chrissie (last edited Mar 01, 2019 11:56PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rosa wrote: "Fire in the Heart, maybe?"

I’m going to try and not get prematurely excited, but a cursory text search on Google Books gave me results back for each keyword that came to mind. (!!)

I’ve ordered a copy, and I’ll be sure to pass along an update either way. Thanks, Rosa!


message 36: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Oooh, fingers crossed!


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rainbowheart wrote: "Oooh, fingers crossed!"

😬🤞


message 38: by Rosa (last edited Mar 02, 2019 01:00AM) (new)

Rosa (rosaiglarsh) | 4974 comments Mine, too!
You can read it online at archive.org, Chrissie. You just need to sign up with your email address. (I probably should have mentioned this before you ordered it.)


message 39: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Chrissie, did you manage to get a copy of the book?


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Rainbowheart wrote: "Chrissie, did you manage to get a copy of the book?"

Got the copy I ordered but have not had a chance to read it. It doesn't feel familiar, but I'm not sure enough to say either way before actually reading it.

I will definitely update this one once I know. Thanks!


message 41: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments No rush! Just let us know when when you know. :)


message 42: by Rosa (last edited Oct 09, 2019 09:57PM) (new)

Rosa (rosaiglarsh) | 4974 comments Rush, rush.


Chrissie (chrissie_w) | 137 comments Alrighty. I have finally gotten around to reading Fire in the Heart. Every step of the way through reading this book, so many parts of it felt familiar and even vaguely recognizable. I can't say with one hundred percent certainty that this is the book, but with reading this I'm thinking I may have conflated two books and meshed the memories of them. This just felt too familiar throughout. And honestly, how many children's/young adult books have the word daguerreotype in them? Not many, let me tell you.

So, let's count this one as solved. Thanks, Rosa!


message 44: by Rosa (new)

Rosa (rosaiglarsh) | 4974 comments You’re welcome, Christine! I’m sorry there wasn’t complete closure for you. I hope you find the other book someday.


message 45: by Rainbowheart (new)

Rainbowheart | 15772 comments Yay, glad this one is solved!

If you have enough details for your other meshed memories, you could try making a separate post for them.


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