On the Southern Literary Trail discussion

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Group Reads: Post-1980 > The News of the World - final discussion - February 2017

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message 1: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
Post your review here if you write one. Don't worry about spoilers here, this is for readers who have finished.


message 2: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
Here is a review by Diane: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 4: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 393 comments I loved the book, and also wrote a review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 5: by Ruthie (new)

Ruthie (ruthiea) | 18 comments Can someone tell me how to add my review here? Thx!


message 6: by John (new)

John (jwarner6comcastnet) | 134 comments Ruthie wrote: "Can someone tell me how to add my review here? Thx!"

If you want to simply add a review, you could just include it. If you want to refer to a review you have already submitted elsewhere, you can look at the link above this text box entitled "(some html is ok)" and look for the code for link.


message 7: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 211 comments Diane, you said you heard Giles interviewed on NPR. Do you remember what programs? I didn't find it in a search Would love to hear what she has to say.

Here's my review. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 8: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
Suzy, it was a while back, right after publication, I'm thinking maybe October or early November. I'm pretty sure Terry Gross was the interviewer, but was not "Fresh Air". It was early afternoon here because I remember sitting in the parking lot at the library to finish listening. Sorry I can't be more informative.


message 9: by Belinda (new)

Belinda Guerette | 27 comments This is a good story. It didn't have a lot of passion, except for the Captain when he took Joanna to her relatives, but the characters and their relationships were interesting. I wonder if we Americans tend to loosely allow our children to form their identities sometime before they are about twenty, whereas native Americans tended to mold their children's identities much quicker. If so, it wouldn't be that difficult for captives to just form a Native American identity, but it would be much harder for them to give up that identity and form a new one when they returned to their American families.


message 10: by John (new)

John (jwarner6comcastnet) | 134 comments I found Capt. Kidd's profession of news reader in the historical novel, News of the World , interesting. He would travel to towns, where I imagine many of the citizens were illiterate, and perform readings from various domestic and foreign newspapers. I also enjoyed learning about the white children captured and adopted by Native American Indians in the 19th century. Finally, I enjoyed reading about the bonding that occurred between this grandfatherly character and a young girl during the journey, each looking after the other.


message 11: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 211 comments I loved the dedication of The Captain to get Johanna to her people near San Antonio, even though he balked at taking on the job in the first place. I found it realistic that he needed to continue to do his job of reading the news even though he had this special mission. The one complaint I have about this book is I found the ending predictable and tied up a little too neatly. I thought Jiles could have made the book a little longer to avoid the rushed feeling of the ending. But, that said, I loved the book and gave it 5 stars. I want to read The Color Of Lightning, which features the story of Britt Johnson, the "freighter" who convinced Captain Kidd to take Johanna to her people.


message 12: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 190 comments I enjoyed this book and loved the Captain and his kindness shown toward Johanna. So glad the ending turned out on a happy note as I am somewhat tired of so many books having a sad or uncertain ending lately.


message 13: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
I agree, Beverly. I couldn't have borne it if either of these characters had a bad ending. As for the widow who chose not to wait for the Captain's return.....well, it was her loss.


message 14: by Doug H (new)

Doug H I enjoyed this novel and I'm happy to have read it, but I wonder how it got classified as a Southern novel? It's set deep in the heart of Texas and largely features cowboys and Indians. I'd classify it as a Western.

Anyhow, here's my review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 15: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
Doug, I think we decided a while back to count Texas as a southern state. Like the rest of us rebels, they like to make their own rules.


message 16: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (last edited Feb 17, 2017 02:57PM) (new)

Tom Mathews | 2428 comments Mod
Doug wrote: "I enjoyed this novel and I'm happy to have read it, but I wonder how it got classified as a Southern novel? It's set deep in the heart of Texas and largely features cowboys and Indians. I'd classif..."

Texas is such a large state that it spans more than one demographic region. In American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America its borders contain four of Woodard's eleven distinct cultural nations: Deep South, Greater Appalachia, El Norte, and The Midlands. Oddly enough, none of what he classifies as The Far West lies within the state of Texas.

Coincidentally, I've just started reading The Son, another book that includes children abducted by Indians, and it did mention that most of the Americans that migrated to Texas came from the Southern states. The other book I'm reading, Our Man in Charleston: Britain's Secret Agent in the Civil War South, points out that much of the westward migration from slave states was because growing cotton quickly leached the nutrients out of the soil requiring constant expansion to new lands further west to meet the production demands of the English mills.

Here is my review.


message 17: by Laura, "The Tall Woman" (new)

Laura | 1862 comments Mod
I love The Son!


message 18: by Laura, "The Tall Woman" (last edited Feb 17, 2017 03:18PM) (new)

Laura | 1862 comments Mod
Tom if you end up liking The Son, according to Meyer's website he will be releasing a series on AMC in Spring 2017. It sounds as though he has been very hands-on for the series. Looks like April 8th is release with 10 episodes with Pierce Brosnan. Google trailer.....looks good.


message 19: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 2428 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "Tom if you end up liking The Son, according to Meyer's website he will be releasing a series on AMC in Spring 2017. It sounds as though he has been very hands-on for the series. Looks like April 8t..."

That's what prompted me to start it. I had a (rare) opening on my audiobook dance card and thought that I'd like to read this one before the series starts.


message 20: by Laura, "The Tall Woman" (new)

Laura | 1862 comments Mod
I had no idea...I was digging for a 3rd book but saw the series and how much he was contributing to it. It looks entertaining. How is the audio version? I read 4 years ago so details are limited.


message 21: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 2428 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "I had no idea...I was digging for a 3rd book but saw the series and how much he was contributing to it. It looks entertaining. How is the audio version? I read 4 years ago so details are limited."

So far the audio is really good. The cast is fantastic: Will Patton, Scott Shepherd, Kate Mulgrew & Clifton Collins Jr.


message 22: by Laura, "The Tall Woman" (new)

Laura | 1862 comments Mod
You had me at Will Patton!


message 23: by Dustincecil (new)

Dustincecil | 175 comments Really enjoyed finishing this last night. I'm curious to check out the color of lightning.


message 24: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
Dustin, Paulette Giles talked at length about THE COLOR OF LIGHTNING. The main character was actually a real person, and she did tons of research on children abducted by Indians.


message 25: by Belinda (new)

Belinda Guerette | 27 comments I LOVE the way that Doris describes Joanna: "The doll is like herself, not real and not not-real... You can put her in any clothing and she remains as strange as she was before because she has been through two creations... To go through our first creation is a turning of the soul we hope toward the light, out of the animal world... To go through another tears all the making of the first creation and sometimes it falls to bits. We fall into pieces. "


message 26: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 2428 comments Mod
FYI: There's actually an entire discussion category dedicated to book festivals. Granted, it's down towards the bottom but there are a lot of entries. Here's the link.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/group...


message 27: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 2428 comments Mod
On the subject of Indian captives, The Son has a lot of great information on the subject. I can easily see how a boy might be attracted to the native life and not want to return to the dour structured life of the white men but the life of a captive girl doesn't seem nearly as appealing. I realize that this is also a novel but I get the impression that Philipp Meyer did a lot of research on the lives of captives during their captivity.


message 28: by Dustincecil (new)

Dustincecil | 175 comments I dunno Tom... just getting out of having to do all that laundry alone might have been worth it for girls. Didn't they still wear like 7 layers of underwear at that point in time?


message 29: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 2428 comments Mod
Dustincecil wrote: "I dunno Tom... just getting out of having to do all that laundry alone might have been worth it for girls. Didn't they still wear like 7 layers of underwear at that point in time?"

From what I read of the captive German girl's life in The Son, the trade off wasn't all that great. Her life was pretty much drudgery with little opportunity for relief. A boy, on the other hand, could display acts of courage and work his way up to a full member of the tribe.


message 30: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 3786 comments Mod
There was a quote in GOOD LORD BIRD by the boy pretending to be a girl to the affect that he was being worked harder as a free black girl than he had ever worked as a slave boy.


message 31: by Laura, "The Tall Woman" (new)

Laura | 1862 comments Mod
Loved this one. I too loved the ending and like Diane I don't think I could have handled it if the Captain and Johanna didn't have happy endings. This was a true love story. I'm a softie at heart so, of course I was crying the last 3-4 pages. 5 stars from me. What a great read.
What Robert Duvall for the Captain if a movie is made?


message 32: by John (new)

John (jwarner6comcastnet) | 134 comments Laura wrote: "Loved this one. I too loved the ending and like Diane I don't think I could have handled it if the Captain and Johanna didn't have happy endings. This was a true love story. I'm a softie at heart s..."

I believe Robert Duvall would be anothe good choice.


message 33: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 211 comments I just watched A Series of Unfortunate Events on Netflix (the tv show, not the movie) and, believe it or not, Don Johnson played a role in episodes 7-8 that said to me he could be good as The Captain. He's almost tall enough an almost old enough. :)


message 34: by Kim (new)

Kim Kaso | 590 comments I met Don Johnson while he was filming chase scenes around my workplace (Grace Cathedral in SF) with Cheech Marin. He was eye level with me, and he had on boots with heels. I am 5'2". I was shocked at how "not tall" he was, my husband, who is 6 4 1/2, loomed over both of us. :-)


message 35: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 211 comments Kim wrote: "I met Don Johnson while he was filming chase scenes around my workplace (Grace Cathedral in SF) with Cheech Marin. He was eye level with me, and he had on boots with heels. I am 5'2". I was shocked..."

Well, scratch Don for The Captain :)


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