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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot, #4)
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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd > Week 1, Chapters 1-10, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

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message 1: by Alexa (last edited Oct 02, 2016 03:58PM) (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments Let's discuss the first part of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie, Chapters 1 - 10. Please make sure you don't give us any details for anything past Chapter 10 here! This is a mystery and we want to be extra careful about No Spoilers!


message 2: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments I would like to welcome and thank Charlene, who has graciously volunteered to moderate this month's discussion. Thanks Charlene!


Charlene Morris | 1127 comments Mod
I can't seem to find questions without spoiling the ending of the book for myself, so lets start with some ideas from Lit lovers.

Do any of the characters remind you of someone you know?

Were you engaged immediately, or did it take you a while to
"get into it"?


message 4: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1132 comments Mod
Agatha Christie is an author I go to when I have a reading slump or am sad. She makes my life better. She is easy to read, yet always has a surprise ending.


message 5: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1132 comments Mod
I read this book in 1999. I remember "who dun it," but I don't remember the journey. I am rereading it to look for clues which Ms. Christie always leaves lying around, but obscures by surrounding them with other facts. Yes, there are clues this early in the book, but it is unlikely that a first time reader will spot them.


message 6: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1132 comments Mod
Chapter 2 begins with a description of King's Abbot. It starts with "our village is very much like any other village. Our big town is Cranchester, nine miles away. We have a large railway station, a small post office and two rival "General Stores." Immediately, I can picture all I need to know using my own imagination. Compare Christie's sparse, but crisp, descriptions to those of Dickens who would have describe the village in one or two long and laborious chapters.


message 7: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1132 comments Mod
I love Sheppard's snide thoughts as the book progresses, starting on the first page when he suggests that the motto of mongoose should be adopted by his sister.


message 8: by ☯Emily , The First (last edited Oct 03, 2016 10:58AM) (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1132 comments Mod
What is a marrow? Finally looked it up and Americans would call these vegetables "squash." I certainly think zucchini bread sounds better than marrow bread. Some examples are here: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...


message 9: by Ginny (last edited Oct 04, 2016 08:40AM) (new) - added it

Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments I am really enjoying the narrator and his sister. "Caroline can do any amount of finding out by sitting placidly at home." This seems to me typically Christie, although I haven't read her work for a very long time. I think the reader can trust Caroline's observations and interpretations more than those of her brother James. He blithely dismisses Geoffrey Raymond as a suspect, naively declaring "Youth is very buoyant. Even the brutal murder of his friend and employer could not dim Geoffrey Raymond's spirits." Through his naivety, he leaves us clues.

What is meant by a "silver table"? I gather it has a lid, and things are kept in it. A glass lid, maybe, so silver objects can be viewed? For once, google let me down.


message 10: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments Perhaps the cabinet where the silverware is kept? With a lid that lifts up to access the most commonly used pieces, and a drawer under that for other pieces such as the servingware. And then it might have legs, making it more of a table shape, or it might have more spaces with doors for larger pieces.


Charlene Morris | 1127 comments Mod
Does anyone watch Downton Abbey? I thought of the silver table would be similar to the case table that Robert kept his collection of snuff boxes in. Something with a glass top that you can see the items through. Otherwise, why would Roger keep a dagger in with the silverware?

It was also in a parlor so it wasn't for storage. Parlors were more for showing off back in Agatha Christie's time.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 352 comments Haven't read any of the comments, just wanted to say I started last night. :)


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 352 comments ... & I am enjoying. With just a few sentences, Christie makes me"see" her characters so clearly.

Emily, I am impressed that you can remember exactly when you have read this before! I know I have read it before - probably at least 3 times, last time at least twenty years ago.


message 14: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1132 comments Mod
Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote: "... & I am enjoying. With just a few sentences, Christie makes me"see" her characters so clearly.

Emily, I am impressed that you can remember exactly when you have read this before! I know I have ..."


Oh, I know when I read the book because I record it in the book when I am done. I remember the villain, but wouldn't know when I read it if I hadn't written down the date.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 352 comments ☯Emily wrote: " Oh, I know when I read the book because I record it in the book when I am done.

Pre GR I was so glad when my local library started sticking a piece of paper in the front of their books so readers could note already read. I brought so many Dick Francis books home only to find (a few pages in) that I had already read them.


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